Municipal Development Counselling (MUDEC) Group .:: MUDEC GROUP ::.
  • Our Mission

    • Reducing poverty in our municipalities through encouraging gender equality and increasing citizen (End User) participation in democratic and governance processes.

Gender Audit

 

Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

 

This Gender Audit was commissioned and sponsored by the Local

 

Government Training Center- Buea.

 

The Gender Audit team therefore wishes to express their appreciation to

 

the CEFAM Board of Directors for approving and financing the Gender Audit.

 

The team equally wishes to express their profound gratitude to the

 

management of CEFAM especially the Director, Mme Eloundou Marie-

 

Therese, for her active cooperation and for facilitating the whole process,

 

providing valuable information when interviewed.

 

Our sincere thanks go to the entire staff and student of CEFAM who

 

provided us with valuable information. Special thanks also to all the

 

respondents who were interviewed or who completed questionnaires during the

 

Audit.

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

TABLE OF CONTENT

 

Acknowledgments

 

 

 

………………………………………………………2

 

Table of Contents

 

 

 

……………………………………………………….3

 

Executive Summary

 

 

 

…………………………………………………….4

 

CHAPTER ONE

 

1.

TERMS OF REFERENCE OF THE GENDER AUDIT………7

1.1) Introduction………………………………………………………….7

 

1.2) The Problem Statement……………………………………………8

 

1.3) Objective of the Gender Audit…………………………………….9

 

1.4) The scope of the Gender Audit…………………………………….9

 

1.5) Limitations of the Gender Audit…………………………………10

 

1.6) Expected products of the Gender Audit………………………….10

 

1.7) Methodology of the Gender Audit……………………………….11

 

1.8) Methods used……………………………………………………..11

 

1.9) Instruments used…………………………………………………12

 

1.10) Implementation arrangements……………………………………12

 

1.11) The Gender Audit Team…………………………………………12

 

CHAPTER TWO

 

2.

 

CEFAM – BACKGROUND

……………………………………14

2.1) Creation of CEFAM………………………………………………14

 

2.2) Purpose of CEFAM………………………………………………14

 

2.3) Policies of CEFAM………………………………………………14

 

2.4) Strategies of CEFAM…………………………………………….14

 

2.5) Activities of CEFAM…………………………………………….15

 

2.6) Organization and Management of CEFAM………………………17

 

2.7) Beneficiaries and Partners of CEFAM…………………………..19

 

2.8) Services for which CEFAM needs partnership…………………..32

 

2.9) Support/Supervisory Organizations of CEFAM…………………32

 

2.10) Future plans of CEFAM………………………………………….32

 

 

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

CHAPTER THREE

 

3.

GENDER GAPS IDENTIFIED………………………………………34

3.1)

Policies and Strategies of CEFAM.……………………………………34

3.2)

Organization and Management of CEFAM………………………34

3.3) CEFAM Staff…………………………………………………….35

 

3.4) Budgetary allocation……………………………………………..36

 

3.5) Local Government training………………………………………37

 

3.6) Beneficiaries……………………………………………………..38

 

3.7) The positioning of women by political parties…………………..38

 

3.8) The legal framework……………………………………………..38

 

3.9) Partners…………………………………………………………..38

 

3.10) Constraints/problems faced by CEFAM in bringing about Gender

 

equality in CEFAM and Councils………………………………..38

 

CHAPTER FOUR

 

4.

 

 

PROPOSALS FOR GENDER MAINSTREAMING IN

LOCAL GOVERNMENT TRAINING

 

 

 

……………………….39

4.1) Organisation and Management of CEFAM…………..………….39

 

4.2) CEFAM Management……………………………………………40

 

4.3) CEFAM Staff…………………………………………………….40

 

4.4) Budgetary allocation……………………………………………..40

 

4.5) Local Government Training………………………………………41

 

4.6) Beneficiaries……………………………………………………….42

 

4.7) Partners…………………………………………………………..43

 

4.8) Conclusion ………………………………………………………43

 

 

 

References…………………………………………………………………45

 

Annexes..…………………………………………………………………..46

 

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LIST OF TABLES

 

Plan of Work……………………………………………………………………12

 

Educational Qualification……………………………………………………….17

 

Management staff of gender…………………………………………………….17

 

Gender Representation in position held……………………………………….18

 

Family size of Council…………………………………………………………20

 

Council staff educational level by Gender…………………………………….21

 

Decision making in the Council……………………………………………….24

 

Roles of Councillors……………………………………………………………25

 

Gender Representation………………………………………………………..25

 

Differences between male and female Mayors………………………………..30

 

Participation guide…………………………………………………………….44

 

LIST OF FIGURES

 

CEFAM Ex-Students by Gender………………………………………………16

 

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

 

Despite of some progress from much advocated gender and development

 

programmes in different aspects of life in recent years, women are still under

 

represented in senior government positions in the formal and private sectors and

 

in most cases are excluded from the decision making process in Cameroon.

 

Considering this situation, which needs to be addressed, a gender audit was put

 

in place.

 

However, the situation calls for a need to carry out a gender audit with

 

the aim of further identifying gender gaps/ imbalances in local governance

 

which will help build strategies to improve on the training and outreach

 

programmes of CEFAM.

 

The audit started in April and was programmed to end in June 2003.

 

During this period, the gender audit team had the work of carrying out

 

interviews with the management, staff and students of CEFAM for the first

 

phase. The 2

 

nd

phase looked at the other organs, stakeholders and beneficiaries

of CEFAM activities such as Mayors, Councillors, Council staff, Council

 

beneficiaries (by gender representation), partners, supervisory authorities and

 

Council Support Fund (FEICOM)

 

Several methods were used satisfactorily to acquire information to feed

 

the audit report. The sample size could not be reached because of budgetary

 

constraints. These notwithstanding, plausible results were arrived at. An overall

 

expected out put of this audit is the proposal for strategies for gender sensitive

 

curriculum/mainstreaming for local government training.

 

 

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

CHAPTER ONE

 

1.0 TERMS OF REFERENCE OF THE GENDER AUDIT

 

1.1 INTRODUCTION

 

The Local Government Training Center known by its French acronym as

 

CEFAM, is the only state institution responsible for building the capacities of

 

councils in Cameroon. It is responsible for the training of elected councilors and

 

council staff. Since its inception in 1977, Gender and Development have not

 

been given a serious thought.

 

At a time when Cameroon is planning to decentralize and give regions

 

increased autonomy and authority, CEFAM should take a lead to ensure that

 

males and females of all ages equitably participate and benefit from Local

 

Government. For this to happen, CEFAM needs to improve on its gender

 

mainstreaming in order to assist councils to make policies and programmes

 

more gender sensitive and therefore make for better local governance.

 

There is greater awareness of the need for ethics, accountability, equal

 

participation of both sexes of all ages as well as transparency in public life

 

today. This realization has been supported by the emergence of a consensus that

 

good governance and sound public administration underpin sustainable human

 

development.

 

Sound governance is increasingly being perceived as indispensable to

 

development, effective management, peace, stability and security. It is for this

 

reason that organisations such as the United Nations Development Program

 

(UNDP) ASSIST African countries to develop capacities for various

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

dimensions of sound governance. The UNDP, for instance ,gives assistance for

 

activities related to:

 

 

 

Governing institutions,legislatures,judiciaries and electoral bodies;

 

 

 

 

Public and private sector management;

 

 

 

 

Civil society organisations

 

 

 

 

Decentralization and Local governance

 

 

 

 

Countries in special circumstances

Decentralization and the participation of Civil Society in public life and

 

capacity building are very important aspect of sound governance an area

 

CEFAM is actively involved in. However, it is today widely accepted that the

 

above mentioned elements cannot result in good governance if gender is not

 

taken into consideration and local development in particular. As far as

 

decentralization is concerned, the increased participation of civil society in

 

public life and local governance can only succeed with the emergence of an

 

egalitarian society where men and women are free to decide the pace and

 

direction of their development. An egalitarian society cannot emerge when the

 

capacities of women who constitute more than 51% of Cameroon’s population

 

are not developed nor enhanced especially in the aspect of local governance.

 

 

 

1.2 THE PROBLEM STATEMENT

 

Despite their economic importance in Cameroon, women are not recognised

 

as equal partners having the capacity for political and economic leadership;thus

 

they remain “invisible” in the policy arena. In many cases, customary or

 

codifies laws that govern inheritance, property rights, land tenure and use as

 

well as access to financial resources and educational /training facilities put

 

women at a disadvantage. In spite of some progress in recent years in

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

Cameroon, women are still under- represented in senior government positions

 

in the formal and private sectors and in most cases , are excluded from the

 

decision- making processes.

 

In the domain of local government, this situation is critical. A study

 

commissioned by the British Council Yaounde, carried out by the “Project

 

Parity” (Abdela,2000) indicates that in the previous mandate of elected

 

officials, only 2 out of 300 mayors are women; and only 12% of councillors

 

were women. From available information, it appears that there was only a very

 

slight increase in the number of women in council executive and deliberating

 

organs from the last council elections in June 2002. Even at the level of council

 

personnel, a casual observation of duty posts held by women in some council

 

shows that women are generally employed in support roles as secretaries and

 

clerks.

 

1.3 OBJECTIVES OF THE GENDER AUDIT

 

The objectives of the Gender Audit are as follows:

 

a) General Objectives

 

 

 

To identify gender gaps/imbalance/ inequalities in Local

governance and make recommendations for mainstreaming gender

 

in CEFAM training programmes.

 

 

 

b) Specific Objectives

 

 

 

To investigate gender issues in local government training;

 

 

 

 

To identify gender gaps in CEFAM and its outreach activities;

 

 

 

 

To determine what constraints/problems CEFAM faces in

mainstreaming gender;

 

 

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

 

 

To identify gender gaps in local council activities and

management;

 

 

 

 

 

To make recommendations for gender mainstreaming in local

government training;

 

 

 

 

 

To propose a methodology for the development of an appropriate

gender sensitive curriculum for mainstreaming gender into local

 

government

 

 

 

1.4 THE SCOPE OF THE GENDER AUDIT

 

Focus: An audit is an examination or review that assesses and reports

on the extent to which a condition, process or performance conforms

 

to standards and procedures (UNDP,2000). This gender audit will

 

review and seek to identify gender gaps in local governance and local

 

government training and make recommendations for the

 

mainstreaming of gender in CEFAM training programmes and

 

activities.

 

Time frame: The first place of this gender audit which entailed

carrying out the audit in CEFAM took place in April 2003. The 2

 

 

nd

 

 

phase, comprising field visits ran from May to July 2003. As a resultsharing

 

symposium was previewed for later in the year.

 

Geographic Coverage. The audit was carried out with CEFAM

management, staff and students. Later, questionnaires were

 

administered to Councils and Mayors as well as to some supervisory

 

authorities such as the Director of Local Government in MINATD.

 

These persons were interviewed through out the entire country.

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

Subject of the study. For the first phase CEFAM management, staff

and students would be the subject of study. For the second phase,

 

members of the CEFAM Board of Directors, CEFAM beneficiaries

 

(Councils) and partners as well as supervisory authorities will be

 

interviewed and /or questioned. From the Councils, the following

 

were interviewed and/or questioned via questionnaires:

 

 

 

 

Mayors (Male and Female)

 

 

 

 

Councillors (Male and Female)

 

 

 

 

Council Staff (Male and Female)

 

 

 

 

Council Beneficiaries(Male and Female)

Partners include International and local partners of CEFAM and Councils

 

 

1.5 LIMITATIONS OF THE GENDER AUDIT

 

The main limiting factor of the Gender Audit was as follows:

 

The Response of Questionnaires: Some of the respondents who were

French speaking left many questions unanswered and some students

 

did not respond at all. For instance out of 45 questionnaires given out

 

to students only 34 were recorded. The team feels this may have a

 

slight effect on the information obtained. Due to budgetary and time

 

constraints it was not possible to carry out extensive audit of some

 

local council organizational systems.

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

1.6 EXPECTED PRODUCTS OF THE GENDER AUDIT

 

Expected outputs are as follows:

 

1) Identification of gender gaps/imbalances in local government

 

training and Council activities/management

 

2) Gender sensitization of CEFAM and Councils

 

3) Proposal of strategies for gender mainstreaming into local

 

government training and management of councils

 

4) Suggestion of strategies for an appropriate gender sensitive

 

curriculum for local government training

 

5) Suggestion of strategies for appropriate gender sensitive

 

manuals/toolkit for local government training;

 

6) Suggestion for the organisation of training of trainers on gender

 

and local government

 

1.7 METHODOLGY OF THE GENDER AUDIT

 

In order to get the information, the following questions were

 

looked into

 

a) Key questions:

 

How gender sensitive is CEFAM?

 

b) Implementing questions:

 

 

 

How gender sensitive is CEFAM in its policies an dobjectives?

 

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

 

 

How gender sensitive is CEFAM in its strategies of improving the

capacities of local government authorities in terms of recruitment of

 

trainees and outreach activities?

 

 

 

 

 

How gender sensitive is CEFAM in its activities?

 

 

 

 

What are the problems/constraints that militate against gender

mainstreaming in CEFAM?

 

 

 

1.8 Methods used:

 

 

 

The multiple stage clueter sampling method was used to select the

subject of study.

 

For the first phase, CEFAM management,staff and students were selected

 

as primary units. For the second phase:-

 

 

 

 

 

Interviews were carried out with Mayors, Council Staff, Councilors,

Partners, FEICOM, International Organisations

 

 

 

 

 

Questionnaires were filled by some members of the

community/councilors

 

 

 

 

 

Information was gathered through observation

Interviews: As earlier mentioned, CEFAM management staff were

 

interviewed.

 

 

 

 

 

Questionnaires were administered to staff and students.

 

 

 

 

A focus group discussion was held with the auxiliary/ kitchen staff.

 

 

 

 

Observation: Some issues reported on were observed

 

 

 

 

Use of key informant: Certain staff members in key positions valuable

information.

 

Literature Review: A quick review of the books in CEFAM library was made.

 

In addition, document from CEFAM on such issues as the organisation, the

 

staff and student lists, the Board of Directors lists were reviewed. The

 

 

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

documents of the planning summits of 1999 and 2001 as well as workshop /

 

seminar reports between 1985 – 2003 were reviewed.

 

1.10 INSTRUMENTS USED

 

Instruments used were as follows:

 

 

 

Interview guides

 

 

 

 

Questionnaires

 

 

 

 

Observation check lists

 

 

 

 

Focus group discussion guides

 

 

1.11 IMPLEMENTATION ARRANGEMENTS

 

 

 

Management arrangement: The management facilitated the audit process

by ensuring that the staff and students cooperated with the audit team.

 

 

 

 

 

Plan of work: The plan of work was shown in the table below.

No Activity Consultants Deadline

 

1 First phase of Gender Audit Gender Audit Team April – June

 

2003

 

2 Second Phase of gender

 

audit

 

The whole team June -July 2003

 

3 Data Analysis and

 

Reporting

 

The whole team July 2003

 

4 Debriefing of CEFAM

 

Management and handing

 

over

 

The whole team July 2003

 

 

 

1.12 THE GENDER AUDIT TEAM

 

Mr. Charlie Mbonteh:

 

 

 

MBA, Team Leader MUDEC Group, Gender

practitioner (Coordinator)

 

 

Ms Beatrice Eyong:

 

 

 

MSC in Agricultural Extension (University of Reading-

UK) Gender specialist, trainer and extentionist. Specialised in Gender Analysis

 

and Planning, production of media for extension, management of extension

 

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

staff and micro-finance policies. Worked with the United Nations Development

 

Programme (UNDP) Yaounde, SOWEDA and PAID-WA.

 

Ms Esther Binda:

 

 

 

M.A Women and Gender Studies (University of Makerere,

Uganda) Gender Analyst working with PAID-WA Buea, as a gender trainer.

 

 

Ms Gospel Nti:

 

 

 

Post Graduate Diploma, Gender Analyst (Nkong Hill Top

CIG-Buea) Gender Trainer/ Rural Animator.

 

 

Mr. Vincent Anu:

 

 

 

CEFAM Lecturer and Contact person

 

Research Assistants:

 

Mr. Eugene Atem (Coordinator and Development Practitioner EFOLOD,

 

Limbe)

 

Mr. Clifford Olaf (Administrative Assistant and Project Facilitator,

 

MUDEC Group)

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

CHAPTER TWO

 

2.0 CEFAM / COUNCILS BACKGROUND

 

2.1 CREATION OF CEFAM

 

CEFAM was established in December 1977. Prior to this , the institution

 

had existed as the Local Government Training Institute for West

 

Cameroon from 1969

 

2.2 PURPOSE OF CEFAM

 

CEFAM WAS CREATED TO BUILD THE CAPACITY OF

 

LOCAL COUNCILS

 

 

 

. Its main objectives are to

 

 

 

Train and retrain councilors and council staff

 

 

 

 

Organise seminars/refresher courses for councilors, council staff

and personnel of council supervisory authorities.

 

 

 

2.3 POLICIES OF CEFAM:

 

The policy of CEFAM is to enhance the capacities of councils in

 

Cameroon

 

2.4 STRATEGIES OF CEFAM:

 

Strategies used by CEFAM to carry out its policy of capacity

 

enhancements of councils are as follows:

 

·

 

 

Identification of problems in councils

 

 

·

 

 

Training needs analysis;

 

 

·

 

 

Pedagogic meetings

 

 

·

 

 

Organisation of demand driven seminars/refresher courses;

 

 

·

 

 

Use of partners

 

 

·

 

 

Training Courses;

 

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

·

 

 

Outreach activities

2.5 ACTIVITIES OF CEFAM:

 

CEFAM has the following 3 major activities whose main focus is on

 

local government training:

 

 

 

·

 

 

Training

 

 

·

 

 

Consultancy

 

 

·

 

 

Research on Local Government Training

 

 

2.5.1 Training:

 

In order to execute training courses, CEFAM carries out pedagogoc missions to

 

identify the need of the councils. CEFAM runs two types of courses: the long

 

and short courses.

 

2.5.1.1 Long Courses:

 

The long course run for two years on two levels of training namely:

 

Cycle 1 and Cycle 2. Cycle 1 students come in with G.C.E ‘A’ Levels or the

 

French equivalent while Cycle 2 students come in with G.C.E ‘O’ Levels.

 

Though both have similar content, Cycle 1 is of highly specialised. Generally,

 

the course content includes:

 

 

 

Accounting Systems;

 

 

 

 

Bilingual Training (French and English)

 

 

 

 

Computer skills;

 

 

 

 

Council Finance;

 

 

 

 

Drafting administrative acts;

 

 

 

 

Economic and financial analysis of projects;

 

 

 

 

Environment and development;

 

 

 

 

Good Governance;

 

 

 

 

Judicial Institutions;

 

 

 

 

Labour Disputes;

 

 

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Managerial Accounting;

 

 

 

 

Mobilization of Resources;

 

 

 

 

Personnel management;

 

 

 

 

Project Management;

 

 

 

 

Public Contracts

 

 

 

 

Sports;

 

 

 

 

Town Planning Administration;

 

 

 

 

Treasury Management;

 

 

Students

 

 

 

:Students are selected from councils within the Cameroon entire

country. They are recruited according to the following criteria:

 

 

 

 

Educational qualifications;

 

 

 

 

Medical fitness;

 

 

 

 

Authorization from Councils;

 

 

 

 

Sponsorship by councils;

 

 

 

 

Bilingualism: ability to speak French and English;

 

 

 

 

Pass in the entrance examination.

CEFAM has trained over 700 students since its creation in 1977. Of

 

these, 30% are females, while 70% are males

 

CEFAM EX- TRAINERS (GENDER)

 

 

 

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2.5.1.2 Short Courses:

 

Short courses are demand driven and hence organised following the

 

needs of the councils. The duration of these courses is between one to three

 

months. Participants come from councils within the entire national territory.

 

 

 

Selection Criteria: Candidates must have authorization and sponsorship

from their respective councils. These courses are usually adverised like

 

the long courses. Over 1000 participants have been trained. No gender –

 

disaggregated data was available for these course participants

 

ORGANISATION AND MANAGEMENT OF CEFAM

 

CEFAM is a state institute under the ministry of Territorial

 

Administration and Decentralization. It has a Board of Directors that takes

 

decisions and gives its approval on the policies and activities of CEFAM

 

 

 

 

 

Board of Directors (BOD): The BOD of CEFAM is made up of

15members. Out of these members, 2 (13.5%) are women. Members of

 

this BOD come from concerned ministries.

 

 

 

 

 

Management Staff: The management staff is made up of 5 people. Of

these 80% are male and 20% are female. 60 % of the management staff

 

are between 41-50 years of age,20% fall between 31-40 years while the

 

remaining 20% are above 50 years. For the educational background, 80%

 

of them have at least a first degree. The detailed educational

 

qualifications of management staff are represented in the table below.

 

 

 

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EDUCATIONAL QUALIFICATION PERCENTAGE

 

BA/ BSc 40

 

Post Graduate Diploma 20

 

BA /BSc + MA/MSc 40

 

Management Staff Percentage

 

Male 80

 

Female 20

 

Table percentage of management Staff by gender.

 

For their professional background, 40% are teachers, 20% economist and civil

 

administrators, 20 % controller of finance have been Secretary General in the

 

Council.

 

The following table gives the gender representation in positions held

 

Posts Director Assistant

 

Director

 

Head of

 

Pedagogic

 

service

 

Chief of

 

service

 

Administration

 

and finance

 

Controller

 

of Finance

 

Sex Female Male Male Male Male

 

Table: Gender representation in positions held

 

Longevity of Service: 80% of the management staff worked for atleast

15 years while 20% have worked for less than 15 years. The longest

 

serving management staff in CEFAM has worked for 24 years. 60% of

 

these staff have worked in CEFAM for less than 10 years.

 

It is worth noting that the Ministry of Territorial Administration and

 

Decentralization that appoints CEFAM management staff.

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

CEFAM Staff: The staff of CEFAM can be classified under the

following:

 

Staff on Secondment: There are 10 civil servants in secondment

who are mainly lecturers, the Director and Assistant, the Stores

 

Accountant and Accounts Clerk, of these 205 are female and 80%

 

are male.

 

Permanent Staff: These are mainly lecturers and support staff.

The total number of permanent staff is 36. Ou of these,10 are

 

women representing 27.7%. From the staff list it is observed that

 

female staff are mainly in support roles and low status positions

 

such as cooks, secretaries and cleaners. The male staff occupies

 

senior positions such as cashier and accounts clerk

 

Part Time Staff: According to the staff list, there were 15 part

time staff for 2002 second semester. Out of these, only 2 were

 

women (13.3%)

 

Staff Educational Background: The educational background of

CEFAM staff is varied. The staff on secondent have at least G.C.E

 

“A” level. For the teaching staff, the minimium educational

 

qualification is first degree. The support staff have at least first

 

school leaving certificate.

 

Staff Professional Background: Their professional background

is equally varied. The lectures’ professional background ranges

 

from teachers, civil engineers, jurist, accountants, translators,

 

development practitioners and town planning managers,

 

information and communication technologists.

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

Staff Recruitment: Vacancies are usually advertised over the

radio and through newspapers. Interested candidates are free to

 

apply. Criteria used to select the staff are as follows:

 

·

 

 

Academic qualifications (For lecturers it must be atleat first

degree. For support staff, atleast First school Leaving

 

Certificate).

 

 

 

·

 

 

Bilingualism (French and English) required.

 

 

·

 

 

For support staff. Cameroonian nationality is pre-requisite

while for lecturers they may be of any nationality.

 

Using these criteria, the best candidate is selected. Management staff, as earlier

 

mentioned is appointed by ministerial order.

 

 

 

2.6 BENEFICIARIES AND PARTNERS OF CEFAM

 

2.6.1 Beneficiaries:

 

The councils are the direct beneficiaries of CEFAM’s activities.

 

Councils interviewed were selected according to the following classifications.

 

 

 

Urban Councils

 

 

 

 

Rural Councils

 

 

 

 

Councils at provincial boundaries

 

 

 

 

Councils at International Boundaries

 

 

 

 

Councils headed by the party in power

 

 

 

 

Councils headed by the opposition parties

 

 

 

 

Council headed by female Mayors

 

 

 

 

Councils headed by Male Mayors

 

 

 

 

Councils headed by Government Delegates

 

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

The Council with the smallest size according to our sources (students’

 

questionnaires) have 3 staff in their employ while the biggest had over 800

 

workers. The council with the lowest number of councilors has 25 while those

 

with the highest number have 61 councilors.

 

Councils’ Representation bu Gender: 23.9% councillors are females

while 76.1% are males. Female representation within council staff all

 

over the nation is 32.2% while men represent66.8%. In Council

 

management women represent 22.9% and men represent 77.1%

 

The people who work in councils can be divided into council staff,

 

councilors, and mayors/ government delegates. A cross section of Councils

 

from all the 10 provinces in Cameroon was studied.

 

2.7.1.1Council Staff

 

 

 

Age structure: 28.26% of council staff, were between 18-35 years old,

39.13% were between 35-45 years and 28.26% were above 45 years old.

 

About 4.34% did not give details of their age.

 

 

 

 

 

Marital / family status: most of them are married people. 71.73% are

married, 28.27% are single and over 60% had family size between 0 – 5

 

persons. A full detail of family size can be seen in the table below.

 

Family Size Percentages

 

0 – 5 60.86

 

6 – 10 19.56

 

10 and above 23.91

 

No response 17.39%

 

Table: Family Size of Council staff

 

 

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

Could Family size be a constraint for participants to attend training in CEFAM,

 

especially for female council staff.

 

Educational / Professional background: Over 13.04% of council staff

interviewed had the FSCL or equivalent, 19.56% of had G.C.E ‘O’ level

 

or equivalent and 23.19% had ‘A’ level or equivalent while 10.86% had a

 

degree or equivalent as the highest educational qualification.

 

Generally, one can see that over 50% of council staff interviewed had at

 

least G.C.E ‘O’ Level, which is an entry qualification into CEFAM

 

Highest Educational Qualification by Provinces: Certain provinces

seem to have staff with low educational qualifications. The East and

 

North Provinces had staff with the lowest educational qualifications

 

Educational Level by Gender: Generally women’s educational level

was lower though at the G.C.E Advanced level or equivalent, the

 

percentage of women was higher than that of men (shown by the table)

 

Educational Level Female % Male% Remarks

 

FSLC 33.3% 66.7% These are of the

 

older generation

 

‘O’ Level 22.25% 77.25%

 

‘A’ L evel 72.75% 27.25 Fall between

 

18.35 which may

 

be due to

 

sensitization on

 

the education of

 

the girl child

 

Degree 0 100%

 

Table: Council Staff educational level by Gender

 

A total of 32.60% respondents gave no response and out of these 53.35% were

 

women.

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

From the foregone analysis,it seems that the entry qualification for

 

council workers (both men and women) to be trained in CEFAM is not the main

 

problem why local government women’s particpation in training is low.

 

Nevertheless, there less wer cases that need to be mentioned. A male council

 

staff working with the council for 7 years and having First School Leaving

 

Certificate is Chief of Finance. Another case was of a female staff who had

 

been working for 10 years with FSCL and who has never had training before

 

but is an administrative assistant. Such cases need to be improved upon for the

 

efficiency of the councils

 

 

 

Professional Background and Longevity of Service

 

 

The professional background of council staff is also varied. 34.78%

 

of Council staff had worked with their respective councils from 0-5 years

 

and 23.19% have worked for over 6 years. Some council staff work as chief

 

of finance, administrative assistants, provide assistance to the treasurer,

 

Secretary, senior contract office, municipal agent of MINEPIA, civil status

 

secretaries, library assistant, clerks, mails clerk.

 

Functions of Council Staff

 

Those interviewed gave the following as the functions of council staff

 

·

 

 

Assist Council staff

 

 

·

 

 

Carry out tasks assigned by the treasurer

 

 

·

 

 

Municipal treasurer and secretary

 

 

·

 

 

Civil status registry: Register births, marriages and death as well as

draw up these certificates.

 

 

 

·

 

 

Follow up hygiene and sanitation

 

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

·

 

 

Collection of council revenues

 

 

·

 

 

Personnel management Auditing

 

 

·

 

 

Producing Council magazines

 

 

·

 

 

Budgeting

 

 

 

 

Representation of the Professional Background of Council Staff by

gender

 

 

 

Some female council staff hold positions like the secretary general,

 

council treasurer and chief of service for hygiene and sanitation. The rest

 

were assistants to administrative staff, finance officers, accountants as well

 

as secretaries, market collectors, market mistress etc. Here one can see that

 

men hold most of the top positions in councils.

 

Training of Council Staff: About 78.26% of respondents admitted

having received some training. About 10% were trained between 1980 –

 

90 but have not received any training since then. Over 35% had training

 

between 19991 – 2000 and 7% were trained between 2001 – 2003

 

Experts in human development say that 20% of what one learns

 

becomes obsolete in 5 years time. This means that those trained between

 

1980 – 97 need serious retraining.

 

Those who received training were trained on:

 

·

 

 

Treasury and Financial management

 

 

·

 

 

Cycle I training in CEFAM

 

 

·

 

 

Civil status matters

 

 

·

 

 

Council administration / management

 

 

·

 

 

General administration

 

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

·

 

 

Secretariat duties

 

 

·

 

 

Communication skills

 

 

·

 

 

Computer applications

 

 

·

 

 

Revenue analysis

Others, making 21.74% reported that they have never received training for the

 

posts they occupy in the council. Out of those who have never received training,

 

66.66% were women. It is worth noting that, council workers are trained in

 

CEFAM if the mayor or government delegate approves their candidature and

 

gives written authorization. About 80% of those who have never been trained

 

said they have not been given the opportunity and that it is the mayor to decide.

 

None of the respondents indicated had any training on gender and development

 

 

 

 

 

Decision making in councils

 

 

The majority of respondents reported that decisions are taken after

 

the council commissions have deliberated and if necessary vote during

 

council sessions. Many were of the opinion that the mayor or government

 

delegates take the final decision, some even said in their councils mayors

 

take decisions alone. In fact some accused the council executives of using a

 

top – down approach. Only one respondent said decisions were taken

 

participatorily. Full details can be seen in the table below.

 

Who takes decisions % of

 

respondents

 

The mayor and executives and commission heads 72.29%

 

Mayor or government delegate 13%

 

No response 15.21

 

Not my concern 4.34%

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

Table: indicating who takes decision in the councils

 

From the table above it is evident that women’s interests are not given the

 

consideration they deserve, as few women are council executives or heads of

 

commissions.

 

2.7.1.2 COUNCILLORS

 

Age structure:

 

 

 

About 14.3% of councillors fall between 18 – 35 age range, 54 .

4 % fall between 36 – 45 years and 25.6 % were above 45 years. A total of

 

5.6% of councilors interviewed never gave any information on their age range.

 

This shows that the various age groups are represented in the councils, majority

 

of whom fall within the productive and independent age bracket.

 

 

Marital and Family status: Most of the councilors are married. About

88.57% are married, 5.77 are single and 2.85% is a widow, 2.85% did not

 

respond. Most of them are family people. 60% have family sizes ranging

 

between 0-5, 31.43% have between 6- 10 and 5.77% have family sizes of

 

above 11 people 2.85% did not respond.

 

Educational and professional Background: 40% of the councillors

interviewed have FSCL or equivalent, 22.85 had G.C.E ‘O’ Level or

 

equivalent 28.57% had G.C.E ‘A’ Level or equivalent; and 8.57% have a

 

first degree. 2.85% did not respond. Here again, as we earlier saw with

 

the council staff entry qualification is not a major constraint to participate

 

in CEFAM training.

 

Becoming a councilor: when asked why they decided to become a

councilor, 42.8% respondent said it was because they wanted to

 

participate in the development of their areas 31.43% said they wanted to

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

participate in the management of the council and meet the aspirations of

 

the people . The rest gave the following reasons:

 

·

 

 

To help party politics

 

 

·

 

 

Solve problems

 

 

·

 

 

Solve the marginalise problems

 

 

·

 

 

Interest in teamwork

Becoming a councilor requires you to

 

 

 

·

 

 

Be participating in politics

 

 

·

 

 

Live with all your rights

 

 

·

 

 

Have leadership qualities

 

 

·

 

 

Participate in the development of your area

 

 

·

 

 

Be open

 

 

·

 

 

Committed to the people. 88.57% said they become councilors

through election. Others said it was because they were members of a

 

group and their longevity in politics.

 

 

 

The role of the councilor: When asked what their role was, 21.88% said

it was to vote the council budget,31.25% opined that it was to be a

 

mediator between the population and the council while 15.63% said it

 

was to ensure the development of the area. Others gave reasons such as

 

Roles as understood by councilors Percentage %

 

Help the council to be productive 2.85%

 

Draft policy for the area 2.85%

 

Advice the mayor 2.85%

 

Act as facilitator 8.57%

 

Defend the right of your electorate 2.85%

 

Be at the disposal of the people 2.85%

 

Resolve disputes in your area 2.85%

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

Table: Roles of Councilors

 

From the above,it shows that some councilors do not fully understand their

 

roles in the council. 2.85% did not respond.

 

 

 

Training of Councilors: 4o % of Councilors reported having received

training in the following areas:

 

 

 

·

 

 

Budget and Management (14.28% of them)

 

 

·

 

 

Leadership skills (2.85% of them)

 

 

·

 

 

Rights of Council properties (2.85% of them)

 

 

·

 

 

Role of mayor and secretary general (2.85% of them)

 

 

·

 

 

Council Management (8.57% of them)

 

 

·

 

 

Roles of Councilors (14.28% of them)

 

 

·

 

 

Protection of water catchment (2.85% of them)

 

 

·

 

 

Capacity Building (2.85% of them)

 

 

·

 

 

Project organization (2.85% of them)

 

 

·

 

 

Deliberation of council budget (2.85% of them)

Again here, none of them received any training in Gender and

 

Development. On the other hand, 54.28% reported having receiving no training.

 

Reasons given were as follows:

 

-No seminars Organised (11.42% of them)

 

-Lack of such opportunities (11.42% of them)

 

-About to attend a seminar (5.71% of them)

 

-No academic institution meant for training (8.57% of them)

 

 

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

 

 

The role women play in council activities: Councillors indicated that for

the last 12 months, their councils have been in the following activities:

 

 

 

·

 

 

Construction of Schools

 

 

·

 

 

Construction of roads and bridges

 

 

·

 

 

Construction of public toilets

 

 

·

 

 

Road Maintenance

 

 

·

 

 

Construction of grand stands

 

 

·

 

 

Awarded scholarship to students

 

 

·

 

 

Water projects

In all these activities, women played an active role. All respondents agreed that

 

women played the following roles:

 

 

 

·

 

 

Participated in the social aspects

 

 

·

 

 

Provided manual labour and finances

 

 

·

 

 

Provided services as contractors (small)

 

 

·

 

 

Participated in mini agricultural show

 

 

·

 

 

Sensitisation of womens groups and children

 

 

2.7.1.3 MAYORS

 

Age structure:

 

 

 

73.33% of mayors are 45 years,20% are between 35-45 years

and 6.66% are between 30-35 years. It took as if age is an important criterion

 

for one to be selected as a mayor.

 

 

The educational /professional background: Most of the mayors

interviewed were professional teachers. The majority of the mayors have

 

been in service for less than five years.

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

Gender Representation of Mayors: 66.66% Mayors contacted were

males while 33.33% were families ,but generally out of 337 mayors,

 

women (3%) head only 9 councils.

 

Training of council staff as reported by mayor: 86.66% of mayors

admitted carrying out training for its staff while 13.33% indicated that

 

they do not carryout training for their staff.

 

Selection Criteria for training staff: 53.33% of mayors interviewed

identified intellectual/ educational qualifications as important criteria for

 

selection, 40% said it depended on service needs and availability, 13.33

 

said experience and longevity with the criteria, while 13.33% gave no

 

response and 6.66% said they have never had any training before.

 

Needs identification: When asked how needs are identified in their

localities 46.66% that needs are identified through the

 

communities13.33% said it was through Common Initiative Groups

 

(CIGs), 6.66% pointed out that it was based on councilors personal

 

experiences and 33.33% gave no response.

 

The councils do not seem to take specific actions to target particular

 

groups for council projects though some respondents admitted they have

 

done consultative meetings.

 

Sources of council funding: 40% pointed to FEICOM/CAC as the main

funding agencies, 40% said the council licenses,20% gave tolls as a

 

source of funding.

 

Respondent said the following sources of funding are available to councils

 

·

 

 

FEICOM/CAC

 

 

·

 

 

Council Licenses

 

 

·

 

 

Tolls

 

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

·

 

 

Subsidies

 

 

·

 

 

Sand exploitation

 

 

·

 

 

POBB/APE

 

 

·

 

 

Corporations

 

 

·

 

 

Other council activities

 

 

 

 

2.7.2 PARTNERS

 

 

CEFAM works with many partners who can be classified under

 

international and local partners

 

·

 

 

International partners include GTZ, SNV, The British Council,

French Corporation, The commonwealth Secretariat, DED, UNDP,

 

U N- Habitat (amongst others)

 

 

 

·

 

 

Local partners: These include strategies, MUDEC, REDEF, GM

Consultants, DMC etc.

 

 

 

2.7.2.1 International Partners

 

Out of the above mentioned international partners the audit team

 

contacted the following:

 

 

 

SNV, Yaounde but could not interview someone though they work with

councils

 

 

 

 

 

Pro-democracy, could not conduct interview because a new coordinator

is yet to be recruited.

 

How ever, we succeeded to interview the following:

 

 

 

 

 

GTZ –ADEC programme based in Yaounde

 

 

 

 

PACDDU- a European Union programme in Yaounde

 

 

 

 

Friedrich Erbert foundation

 

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

 

 

HELVETAS- in Bamenda

All of the people contacted were married and had at least a first

 

degree or equivalent and were senior officials in these organisations. 80% of

 

them were male and 20% % of female but 75% of these men seem to see a

 

gender imbalances in local governance of our country. 80% of these

 

organisations are based in Yaounde and 20% in Bamenda. 20% of them work

 

with all councils, 40% work with more than 50 councils ,20% work with more

 

than 5 councils and 20% work with 5 councils within the Republic. All of them

 

have worked with councils for at least 2 years. One has even had 10 years

 

experience with FEICOM.

 

 

 

Type of partnership with councils

 

100% of them provide technical assistance to councils and sometimes

 

use CEFAM as resource persons. 80% of them also provided other kinds of

 

assistance.

 

Area of partnership with councils

 

The areas of partnership include:

 

·

 

 

Capacity Building

 

 

·

 

 

Training of executives

 

 

·

 

 

Resource Mobilization

 

 

·

 

 

Financial support for elected council officials to attend international

conferences

 

 

 

·

 

 

Carried out monographic studies

 

 

·

 

 

Project Identification. Feasibility studies and management

 

 

·

 

 

Water supply projects

 

 

·

 

 

Finance micro projects

 

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

·

 

 

Assist village development and cultural associations

 

 

·

 

 

Refurnishing of council offices

 

 

·

 

 

Computerizing council information

 

 

·

 

 

Civil Society reinforcement

 

 

Gender Representation of the councils they work with: 60% of the

respondents said that 91 % of the councils they work with are headed by

 

men while 9% are headed by women. Those who work with 5 councils

 

said all the councils they work with are headed by men.

 

Experiences working with male and female headed councils: 60% of

those interviewed noticed differences between male and female mayors.

 

The table below highlights the differences they noticed.

 

Male Mayors Female Mayors

 

·

 

 

Men fear to loose their jobs;

 

 

·

 

 

Men want to protect their men

so they do not openly criticize

 

other men

 

 

 

·

 

 

Women are open to change

 

 

·

 

 

Women can criticise

intelligently while smiling;

 

 

 

·

 

 

Women are more concrete and

practical

 

 

 

·

 

 

Women are not interested in

politicking but want results;

 

 

 

·

 

 

Women bring more impact;

 

 

·

 

 

Women use knowledge more

efficiently than a man because a

 

prefers to drink but women want

 

to increase income;

 

 

 

·

 

 

Women can perform better than

men if they want to work

 

Table: Perception on performance of male and female mayors

 

With such wonderful attributions to female mayors, the audit team wanted to

 

know why the female participation is still low.

 

 

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

Causes of the low female participation in local government: When

asked why female participation was low, respondents gave many reasons

 

that can be classified as follows:

 

 

Educational Level:

20% of the respondents pointed to low educational

status as a major constraints. 20% agreed that the educational issue has

 

evolved ,with many educated women who want to fill the vacancies created

 

by absentee mayors (sometimes even residing out of the country).

 

 

 

The Women Factor

: Some respondents (women inclusive) mentioned that

women do not cooperate and that some women try to practice the “pull Her

 

Down” attitude. Some said women are not interested in politics and one of

 

the regions cited was the North. However, some respondents argued that

 

women are very interested, but the leadership of political parties does not

 

take gender equality seriously.

 

-Political Factor: Over 60% of respondents opined that the post of the mayor

 

has been highly politicized instead of being the people’s representative.

 

Mayors represent political parties and not the people. Being a Mayor is

 

viewed as a political career and not development oriented. Others said the

 

way political parties constitute their list is not gender sensitive. Some opined

 

that in the unclear rule of the game of politics and democracy; political

 

parties give low positioning to women in electoral lists. Political parties

 

seem to be a major constraint of women becoming mayors.

 

 

 

The Legal Framework:

About 50% of respondents opined that the legal

framework was not conducive. The electoral law stipulates that a political

 

party must support candidates. Even the language of the law is not gender

 

sensitive. A mayor is referred to as a “he”. This is in itself has a

 

psychological effect on the electorate. Another problem highlighted by

 

 

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

respondents was the fact that the population does not vote councilors but a

 

list and mayors are not elected by the population.

 

 

Socio-cultural Factors:

Respondents cited the following socio- cultural

factors: Male dominate, negative customs, triple roles of women and women

 

are viewed as mothers who can not take take good decisions.

 

All the international organisations were interested in assisting

 

councils who are willing with capacity building so as to promote gender

 

equality in local governance.

 

 

 

2.8 SERVICES FOR WHICH CEFAM NEEDS PARTNERSHIP

 

As earlier stated, CEFAM uses partners to carry out its activities. Such

 

activities include:

 

·

 

 

Training

 

 

·

 

 

Outreach activities

 

 

·

 

 

Curriculum development

 

 

·

 

 

Training of trainers in Local Government Training

 

 

·

 

 

Academic Exchange

 

 

·

 

 

Infrastructure and training equipment

 

 

·

 

 

Research

 

 

2.9 SUPPORT/ SUPERVISORY ORGANISATIONS OF CEFAM

 

CEFAM is supervised by the ministry of Territorial Administration

 

and Decentralization. CEFAM beneficiaries (council) are supervised by Senior

 

Divisional Officers (S.D.Os) who are supported by the provincial service

 

councils.

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

CEFAM is also supported by the Special Support Council Fund known by its

 

French acronym as FEICOM.

 

2.10 FUTURES PLANS OF CEFAM

 

CEFAM has the following plans:

 

1. Improvement of the level of training in CEFAM: according to

 

management, plans are on the way to upgrade Cycle 1 and 2. Cycle 1

 

trainees will graduating with a a Bachelor Degree while Cycle 2 with

 

Higher Diploma. There will also be Cycle 3 whose candidates will

 

graduate with a Diploma

 

2. Develop viable and results oriented partnerships. CEFAM intends to

 

develop partnership for curriculum development and gender

 

mainstreaming.

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

CHAPTER THREE

 

3.0 GENDER GAPS IDENTIFIED

 

After going through the whole process, the audit team found out that

 

the problems and the gender gaps linked with low female participation in local

 

government training and consequently local governance are not originating

 

from CEFAM only. They are deep rooted in the fabrics of the society. The

 

gender gaps identified therefore go beyond CEFAM. Gender gaps were

 

identified in the following.

 

3.1 POLICIES AND STRATEGIES:

 

The policies and strategies of CEFAM are gender neutral with no quota for

 

women to ensure equal gender representation within the staff and student body.

 

In fact most of those questioned on this issue said the management of CEFAM

 

can do a lot to ameliorate the situation.

 

3.2 ORGANISATION AND MANAGEMENT OF CEFAM:

 

The Board of Directors (BOD): From the BOD, it is evident that there

is an unequal gender representation. Women make up only 13.5% of the

 

total number of Board members. Again here one see that the men will

 

dominate the decision making processes and gender considerations will

 

not be given the attention they deserve. Moreover, a higher numerical

 

value of men on the Board of Directors can lead to marginalization of

 

women on the Board of Directors. BOD members do not seem to be

 

gender sensitive.

 

a) CEFAM Management:

 

Gender Representation: 20% of management staff are made up of

women while 80% are men. It may be argued that the Director is a

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

woman but no one can deny that the higher numerical value of men in

 

management may have an effect on the decision-making process

 

Gender Awareness: Management does not seem to be gender aware. For

instance, there is no gender component in the CEFAM Curriculum and

 

no gender disaggregated data for trainees could be found. No

 

management staff has ever had any training on gender and development

 

Gender blindness: State appointment of management staff is gender

blind.

 

3.3 CEFAM Staff:

 

Gender Representation: There are fewer women than men on the entire

staff. See table below.

 

Staff % of Male % of Female

 

Seconded staff 80 20

 

Permanent support staff 72.3 27.7

 

Part time staff 86.7 13.3

 

Table: Gender Representation in CEFAM

 

Gender location within the organisational structure: From the staff

list,it is evident that most women on the support staff are located down

 

the organizational structure. Some women’s activities seem just to be an

 

extension of their reproductive roles, for instance being cooks and

 

cleaners.

 

The recruitment procedure is not gender sensitive:The means used for

publicity for jobs favour men. For instance it is generally accepted that

 

few women listen to radio or read newspapers as a result of their triple

 

(reproductive,productive and community management) roles. When

 

asked why the ratio of the female to male staff is low, the respondents

 

gave the following reasons:

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

 

 

 

Few women are found in the specialities required by CEFAM

 

 

 

 

Women hardly present themselves for jobs advertised

 

 

 

 

Women are negligent

 

 

 

 

Women fear embarrassment

 

3.4) BUDGETARY ALLOCATION:

 

There is no budgetary allocation for activities leading to gender

 

awareness/equality

 

3.5) LOCAL GOVERNMENT TRAINING

 

Recruitment of trainees: The ratio of female to male is 3:7, reflecting that fewer

 

women gain entrance into CEFAM. According to respondents;the reasons for

 

such a ratio are as follows:

 

 

 

Fewer women work in councils, as Mayors prefer male council workers.

If mayors prefer male workers then they would prefer to sponsor male

 

workers in CEFAM. Results from the field confirm that some of the

 

mayors prefer male workers. However, some mayors believe that

 

working with women in council matters is preferable because women

 

understand community better.

 

 

 

 

 

The duration of training is too long for female married trainees. So

women find it difficult to stay away from home for 2 years. This again

 

needs t o be verified.

 

 

 

 

 

Low qualification: Women have lower qualifications

 

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

 

 

Women”s constant requests for permission to take care of sick relations.

This is a gender issue as men feel that women are solely responsible for

 

taking care of sick relations

 

 

 

 

 

The immobility of council jobs negatively affects women in councils.

Women are usually those who have to move to join their husbands in

 

their jobs stations when they are transferred. But in the council if the

 

woman moves to join the husband, she loses her job. Could it be why

 

mayors fear to recruit and train women?

 

 

 

CURRICULUM:

 

The study showed the following:

 

-No course on gender in CEFAM curriculum

 

-79.4% of students have never done any course on gender

 

-Over 50% of staff interviewed had never received training

 

in gender

 

-66.6 % of respondents acknowledged having no gender

 

orientation in their courses and lectures integrated .

 

-90% of lectures interviewed had no gender component

 

integrated within their courses

 

3.5.1)

LECTURING AND LECTURES:

The language used in lectures,notes and sometimes textbooks is

 

biased in favour of the male. For instance, the mayor (he) is

 

automatically considered a male while a cook (she) is considered a

 

female.

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

3.5.2)

LIBRARY: A rapid survey of the library showed that out of about

4,000 books only 5 (0.07125%) were on women’s issues. Most of the

 

books (98%) in the library were obsolete.

 

3.6 BENEFICIARIES

 

Councils

 

a)

Gender Representation: At the level of councils, there are fewer

women involved in the management of councils. In fact women represent

 

only 22.99%. Women make up only 23.99% of elected councilors.

 

Abdela reported in 2000 that women made up only 0.6% of elected

 

mayors during previous mandate. The present mandate’s increase of 3%

 

is still insignificant. Female council staff represents only 33.2 of the

 

council staff in the Republic

 

b)

Council Activities: There is no specific action by councils to ensure

equal gender representation and participation in local government and

 

training.

 

c)

Positions held in the councils: From our sources, most women were

found in the lower sections of the councils organisation chart while

 

managing the councils remains the preserve of men.

 

d)

The decision-making processes in the councils:Female and male

officials of the councils are not usually consulted before decisions are

 

taken. Those who are involved involved in taking strategic decisions in

 

the councils are mostly men. Hence special attention may not be given to

 

women’s practical and strategic gender needs.

 

e)

Training of Council staff: 54028% of council staff reported having

received no training and the majority of them were women. Even those

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

who received training amongst the staff and elected officials of the

 

councils ,very few had training in gender and development

 

f)

Budgetary allocation: Most councils have no budgetary allocations for

activities leading to gender awareness/ equality.

 

3.7 THE POSITIONING OF WOMEN BY POLITICAL

 

PARTIES

 

Political parties give low positioning to women in electoral

 

lists.

 

3.8 THE LEGAL FRAMEWORK

 

The language of the law is not gender sensitive. A mayor is

 

referred to as a “he”

 

3.9 PARTNERS

 

 

 

It was observed that few female headed organisations were local

partners of CEFAM

 

 

 

 

 

Women had smaller contracts while men got the bigger contracts

from CEFAM

 

 

 

3.10 CONSTRAINTS/PROBLEMS FACED BY CEFAM TO

 

BRING ABOUT GENDER EQUALITY IN CEFAM AND

 

COUNCILS

 

When asked what constraints/problems were militating against gender

 

mainstreaming in CEFAM, respondents gave the following answers:

 

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1. Lack of gender awareness

 

2. Cultural factors, myth and beliefs about women from councils and

 

the country at large

 

3. Womens triple roles

 

4. Most mayors prefer male labour;

 

5. Male domination and hostilities;

 

6. Level of education

 

7. Family problem

 

8. Female council workers cannot move to accompany the family on

 

transfer (unlike the civil service)

 

9. Gender representation steeming from councils

 

10.Some people (women inclusive) do not know CEFAM

 

11.The socialization process, as women believe they should go for

 

menial jobs

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

CHAPTER FOUR

 

4.0

 

 

PROPOSALS FOR GENDER MAINSTREAMING IN THE

LOCAL GOVERNMENT CENTER (CEFAM)

 

 

 

The audit team wishes to appreciate the following activities carried

 

out by CEFAM towards gender equality:

 

1. Award of prizes for best female student;

 

2. Permission for female student to take part in womens activities such as

 

the International Women’s Day.

 

3. Giving preference to female students in case of a tie during

 

deliberations;

 

4. Providing more security to female students by allowing them live on the

 

upper floors of the hostel.

 

4.1

 

 

ORGANISATION AND MANAGEMENT OF CEFAM

 

 

The Board of Directors: As earlier see women represent only 13.5% of the

 

BOD. This percentage is very low. The audit team proposes that MINARD who

 

chairs the BOD should request concerned ministries to forward the names of

 

two possible representatives indicating that one should be a woman. Out of

 

these names,MINATD could select the names respecting at least a 30% quota

 

for female representatives. There is need for increased female representation so

 

that women can defend their interest and thereby reduce the marginalisation of

 

women in the decisions taken by the BOD.

 

 

 

There should be a planned programme for gender sensitization of

members of the Board of Directors so that the members can appreciate

 

the need for equitable gender participation in local governance, facilitate

 

the approval of budgetary allocations for gender and development

 

 

 

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activities within CEFAM and enable CEFAM policies and strategies

 

facilitate the participation of both sexes in local governance.

 

CEFAM MANAGEMENT

 

 

 

Since management staff are appointed by MINATD, we propose that

there should be an equitable quota allocated to women.

 

 

 

 

 

There should also be a planned programme for gender sensitization of

CEFAM management staff so that management can appreciate the need

 

for equitable gender participation in local governance. This will render

 

CEFAM policies and strategies gender sensitive, thus facilitating the

 

participation of both sexes in local governance. It will equally enable

 

management develop a database based on gender-disaggregated data and

 

assist councils to improve on equitable gender participation in local

 

governance. Management should also give a gender orientation in local

 

governance. Management should also give a gender orientation to

 

CEFAM curriculum; integrate a gender component in CEFAM

 

curriculum and courses as well as recruit female trainees and staff.

 

 

 

CEFAM STAFF

 

 

 

At MINATD, the audit team was reliable informed that it is the

responsibility of the Director of CEFAM to request for staff indicating

 

the type and sex of staff needed. So management should lay emphasis on

 

the need for recruiting and even appointing female staff to management

 

positions.

 

 

 

 

 

Management can use informal means to get the attention of women for

jobs in CEFAM. There are several female professional associations,

 

which could be used to inform women about vacancies in CEFAM.

 

 

 

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Informal meetings could serve as avenues through which information on

 

job vacancies could reach women.

 

 

 

Management should determine to set aside a quota of at least 30% for

female staff.

 

 

 

BUDGETARY ALLOCATION

 

The Board of Directors need to be sensitised on the importance of

 

gender and development. Management should develop activities such as

 

workshops / seminars on gender issues in local governance. These activities

 

will require the Board of Directors to allocate resources towards equitable

 

gender representation and participation in CEFAM and Councils

 

4.5 LOCAL GOVERNMENT TRAINING

 

 

 

Students Recruitment: Some respondents in CEFAM said mayors prefer

male workers and that negatively affects the number of female council

 

workers to be sent for training in CEFAM. Nevertheless, the audit team

 

met with mayors who prefer to work with women so we suggest that

 

CEFAM should start a sensitisation programme for the councils on

 

gender and local government. This will make mayors see the needed to

 

send more female staff for training in CEFAM

 

 

 

 

 

Respondents also pointed to the fact that women have to care for sick

relations. But this is a problem that can be solved by sensitizing our

 

communities on the need for other family members to take care of sick

 

partners. Successful females like the Director of CEFAM whom over

 

60% of CEFAM staff acknowledge as having enhanced the development

 

process of CEFAM and other female politicians could be used as role

 

 

 

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models to encourage other women. They have huge experiences that

 

could be valuable to other women.

 

 

 

CURRICULUM: A gender orientation should be given to the curriculum.

The courses should generally have a gender orientation. Besides, there

 

should be a course on gender and local governance. The Director, while

 

responding on this issue, said the curriculum for the next intake of

 

CEFAM students will be given gender orientation and a core course on

 

gender and local governance will be introduced.

 

 

 

 

 

Staff should attend seminars on gender and development, and gender and

local governance. Trainers and trainers manuals on gender and local

 

governance should be developed with partner organisations

 

 

 

 

 

LECTURING AND LECTURES: The language used in lectures, notes

sometimes text books should be gender sensitive. The language should

 

portray that the mayor, for instance can either be a male or female.

 

 

 

 

 

THE LIBRARY: Considering that CEFAM is involved in

Research,training and consultancy, the library will need to be updated in

 

general to include more books on gender and development as well as

 

others women’s issue. The team was informed that the government has

 

already allocated funds for the updating of the Library. Our suggestion is

 

that those involved in the procurement of these books should be gender

 

sensitive.

 

 

 

4.6 BENEFICIARIES (COUNCILS):

 

The following recommendations will be helpful for councils to

 

send more staff and elected officials for training. This will enable more

 

women to participate in local government.

 

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Gender representation in the Councils: To increase the gender representation

 

in the Councils, the audit team proposes a certain number of

 

recommendations:

 

 

 

Sensitization of the major political parties on the need to have more

women in local government and in strategic places.Sensitization

 

could be done through print media like flyers, information sheet and

 

other media to draw

 

 

 

 

 

Organisation of gender and development training, especially as it

concerns local governance, for the major political parties. This could

 

have a strong starting point by training the councillors from the

 

different political parties.

 

 

 

 

 

There should be a clear policy on positive discrimination for women

. For instance if any council sends more than one trainee for training,

 

at least one should be a woman. Some institutions we contacted insist

 

that for any training, women should be at least 25% of the total

 

trainees.

 

 

 

 

 

The law can insists that a political party should take gender concerns

into consideration when constituting its electoral lists. There should

 

be a quota for women. We recommend that it should be at least 30%.

 

During this audit, a few respondents disliked the idea of setting a

 

quota for women. They quoted the example of France. Although we

 

agree that the standards should not be lowered to facilitate womens

 

access to positions of councillors /Mayors, after serious sensitisation,

 

a quota should be set for women among the people that indicate

 

interest. MINATF should take a leading role in this Note should be

 

taken that SDF and CPDM have a quota policy although this was

 

largely ignored especially in SDF lists during the last elections

 

 

 

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Capacity Building: There is a need to build and constantly reinforce the

capacity of CEFAM and the Councils to mainstream gender and

 

development into their activities.

 

 

 

 

 

Positions held in the Councils: As experienced by the international

organisations interviewed, women can be good catalyst for development

 

if given the opportunity. As the capacity of women in the councils

 

improve, mayors and executives should give women a higher position in

 

Councils.

 

 

 

 

 

Training of Council staff and elected officials: Over 50% of council

people have never had training before and none of them indicated having

 

been trained in gender and development. So there is need for training on

 

gender and local governance to be organised in the councils

 

 

 

 

 

Gender equality should be promoted at grassroots levels in community

organisations.

 

 

 

 

 

Budgetary allocations for Gender and Local Government Training:

Mayors / Government delegates and their councillors should make

 

budgetary allocations for the above mentioned training.

 

 

 

4.7 PARTNERS

 

CEFAM management should encourage partnership with

 

organizations headed by women. Women should be given the opportunities of

 

securing bigger contracts. Eyong (1997) opinioned that when income of women

 

increases the nutritional and health status of the family improves. In addition to

 

this, the social status and self –confidence of women increase when their

 

income increases.

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

4.8 CONCLUSION

 

The Gender Audit revealed that CEFAM Programmes and local

 

government in our country falls below the norms required for promoting on

 

gender equality. Nevertheless, the team acknowledges that the causes of these

 

gender gaps go beyond CEFAM. MINATD, Councils,political parties,

 

international organizations and the society at large each have a role to play to

 

improve on the participation of women in local government and local

 

governance. That is why we propose the following participation guide.

 

PARTICIPATION GUIDE

 

Activities/

 

Recommendations

 

Role of CEFAM Role of MINATD Others partners

 

Development of

 

curriculum on

 

gender and

 

development

 

course

 

Financing Board

 

Validation

 

Official Support Resource Persons

 

Curriculum for

 

outreach training

 

on Gender and

 

Local Governance

 

Part Financing

 

Resource persons

 

Official Support Resource Persons

 

part financing

 

Training of Local

 

Partner Trainers

 

in Gender and

 

Local Governance

 

Resource persons Official Support

 

Supervision

 

Financing

 

Supervision

 

Participation

 

Multiplication of

 

Training

 

Supervision Official Support Financing

 

Resource Persons

 

Dissemination of

 

results

 

Resource persons Official Support Financing

 

Resource Persons

 

References

 

Eyong B.C, (August 1997). Agricultural Extension and Rural Development

 

Department, University of Reading, England.

 

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OESP Handbook Series (1997) Result-Oriented Monitoring and Evaluation,

 

United National Development Programme

 

Workshop Report (June 2002) Orientation Workshop for Councils of the Elak

 

Rural Council.

 

Manuel de l’audit de Genre Participatif de la SNV (2003)

 

National Programme On Government for Cameroon : Diagnosis and Proposal

 

(August 1999)

 

ANNEXES

 

List of Councils contacted

 

List of Organisations contacted

 

Questionnaire : CEFAM Management

 

CEFAM Staff

 

CEFAM Students

 

Mayors / Local Partners

 

Councilors

 

Council Staff

 

Interview Guide : Senior Divisional Officers

 

FEICOM

 

MINATD

 

International Partners

 

Focus group discussion

 

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Lists of Councils contacted

 

No. Province Names of Councils

 

1. Adamawa -Ngaoundere Urban Council

 

2. Centre -Mbangassina Rural Council

 

-SA’A Rural Council

 

-Yaounde IV Urban Council

 

3. East -Gari – Gombe Rural Council

 

-Batare –oya Rural Council

 

4. Littoral -Mbanga Rural Council

 

-Douala IV Urban Council

 

5. North -Garoua Rural Council

 

-Garoua Urban Council

 

-Pitoa- Rural Council

 

6. North West -Njinikom Rural Council

 

-Batibo Rural Council

 

-Elak Rural Council

 

-Fundong Rural Council

 

-Bali Rural Council

 

7. South West -Tombel Rural Council

 

-Muyuka Rural Council

 

-Limbe Urban Council

 

-Idenau Rural Council

 

-Buea Rural Council

 

-Eyumojock Rural Council

 

-Mbonge Rural Council

 

8. West -Foumban Urban Council

 

-Bafang Urban Council

 

-Mbouda Rural Council

 

-Bafoussam Urban Council

 

-Babadjou Rural Council

 

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LIST OF ORGANISATIONS CONTACTED

 

 

 

SNV

 

 

 

 

HELVETAS

 

 

 

 

PACDDU

 

 

 

 

GTZ

 

 

 

 

FRIEDRICH EBERT

 

 

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INTERVIEW GUIDE FOR CEFAM MANAGEMENT

 

Name…………………………………….Division of Origin………………………………….

 

Sex Male Age 20 – 30 Marital Status Maried

 

Female 31 – 40 Single

 

41 – 50 Divorced

 

51 and above Widow

 

Separated

 

Position in CEFAM:…………………………………………………………………………

 

Professional Background……………………………………………………………………

 

Educational Background…………………………………………………………………….

 

Longevity of Services:……………………………………………………………………….

 

1.When was CEFAM created?………………………………………………………………………………………..

 

2.Why was CEFAM created? (Purpose,Objectives)………………………………………………………….

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………..

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………..

 

3.What are the policies of CEFAM?……………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………..

 

4.What are the activities of CEFAM?………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

5.What are the strategies used to carryout your activities?………………………………………………….

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………….

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………….

 

6.How are the trainees recruited?…………………………………………………………………………………..

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

7.How many men and women have been trained since its creation?

 

Men……………… Women………………….

 

Why this ratio?……………………………………………………………………………………………………….

 

8.Wahat is the staff strength of CEFAM?…………………………………………………………………….

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………….

 

9.Wahat are the recruitment criteria for staff?………………………………………………………………

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………….

 

10.How many males and females? Male……………………. Female………………………

 

Why the ratio?………………………………………………………………………………………………..

 

11.What is the educational background of the staff?……………………………………………………..

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

12.What is the professional background of the staff?……………………………………….

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

13.What are the different levels of training in CEFAM?………………………………………………….

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………..

 

14.What is the course content of each level?………………………………………………………………….

 

15. After training does CEFAM have any different links with trainees in the councils?

 

– Yes If yes how?

 

– No If No why

 

16. Are there any activities geared towards gender equality within CEFAM?

 

Yes No

 

-If Yes what are they?………………………………………………………………………………………………….

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

-If No why not?………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

17.Are there any activities geared towards gender equality within Councils?

 

Yes No

 

-If Yes…………………………………………………………………………………………..

 

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18. Is there any budgetary allocation for gender equality Yes No

 

If Yes why?………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

If No why not? ………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

19.Are there problems / constraints you face in bringing about gender equality in CEFAM

 

Yes No

 

If Yes, what are they?………………………………………………………………………………………………..

 

…….…………………………..………………………………………………………………

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………..

 

20.Are these problems / constraints you face in bringing about gender equality within the

 

councils? Yes No

 

If Yes, what are they?……………………………………………………………………………………………..

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

21.What do you think could be done to help you overcome the above mentioned problem /

 

constraint (suggestions)

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

22.What are the services for which you need partners?

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

23.Who are these partners?

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

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CEFAM GENDER AUDIT

 

QUESTIONNAIRE FOR CEFAM STAFF.

 

Sir or Madam

 

I am a member of the MUDEC Group commisioned by the CEFAM management

 

to carry out a Gender Audit of its policies , programmes and activities. I will be very grateful

 

if you can spare some time and answer these questions.

 

Name…………………………………….Division of Origin………………………………….

 

Sex Male Age 20 – 30 Marital Status Married

 

Female 31 – 40 Single

 

41 – 50 Divorced

 

51 and above Widow

 

Separated

 

Position in CEFAM:…………………………………………………………………………

 

Professional Background……………………………………………………………………

 

Educational Background…………………………………………………………………….

 

Longevity of Services:……………………………………………………………………….

 

1.What course do you lecture?……………………………………………………………….

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

2.What does the word gender mean to you

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

3.What is the ratio of men to women in the student population of CEFAM

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

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4.Is this ratio satisfactory?

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

5.What is the level of academic performance for male and female students?

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

6.Does your course have any gender orientation?

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

7.Does your course have any gender component?

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

8.How many women and men make up the CEFAM staff?

 

Women………………………. Men………………………………….

 

9.Are you satisfied with the situation?

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

10.If yes, why?

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

If no – what can be done?

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

11.Are there specific duties for women and men in CEFAM?

 

Women………………………………………………………………………………………

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………….

 

Men………………………………………………………………………………………

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………….

 

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14.What jobs do you think women should perform in CEFAM

 

………………………………………………………………………………………

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………….

 

15.How do you relate to female Director?

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………….

 

16.What do you think about female leadership

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………….

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………….

 

17.Which leadership do you prefer , Male or Female

 

Female Male

 

18.Why?

 

………………………………………………………………………………………

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………….

 

Thank You

 

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CEFAM GENDER AUDIT

 

QUESTIONNAIRE FOR CEFAM STAFF.

 

Sir or Madam

 

I am a member of the MUDEC Group commisioned by the CEFAM managment

 

to carry out a Gender Audit of its policies , programmes and activities. I will be very grateful

 

if you can spare some time and answer these questions.

 

Name…………………………………….Division of Origin………………………………….

 

Sex Male Age 20 – 30 Marital Status Maried

 

Female 31 – 40 Single

 

41 – 50 Divorced

 

51 and above Widow

 

Separated

 

Name of Council:…………………………………………………………………………

 

Are you working with the Council Yes No

 

If yes,for how long?……….…………………………………………………………………….

 

Professional Background?…………………………………………………………………….

 

Cycle 1 2

 

1.Why did you want to be trained in CEFAM?………………………………………………

 

2.How were you selected for training by CEFAM?…………………………………………………………..

 

…….……………………………………………….……………………………………………

 

3.How were you selected for training by your Council?…………………………………………………….

 

…….……………………………………………….……………………………………………

 

4.How many students are in your class?……………………….Male……………..Female…………

 

5.How many lecturers do you have ?………………………….Male………………Female…………

 

6.What are the courses in your curriculum?…………………………………………………………………..

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………….

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

7.Is there any course given in gender and development? Yes No

 

8.What courses are handled by male lecturers…………………………………………………

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………….

 

9.Female lecturers………………………………………………………………………………

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………….

 

10.Have you ever received any training in Gender and Development? Yes No

 

If Yes, When…………………………. And Where……………………………………….

 

11.How many staff are employed by the Council?

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………….

 

12.How many are men …………………………and women………………………..?

 

13.How many staff make up the management of your Council?……………………………………

 

14.How many are men………………………… and Female……………………………….?

 

15How many Councillors are in your Council?…………………………………………………..

 

16.How many are men………………………….and Female……………………………….?

 

17.What are the roles for the Councillors?

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………….

 

18.. Are there any specific roles assigned to

 

Men? Yes No

 

19.If Yes, what are they?

 

20.If no, why not?

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………….

 

21.Are there any specific roles assigned to

 

– Women? Yes No

 

22.If Yes what are they?

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………….

 

23.Are there any activities carried out by your council to ensure that men and women

 

participate equally in community activities? Yes No

 

If Yes, what are they?

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………….

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

If No,why not?

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………….

 

24.how would the knowledge gained in CEFAM meet the needs of the men in your Council

 

area?

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………….

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………….

 

25.How would the knowledge gained in CEFAM meet the needs of women in your Council

 

area?

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………….

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………….

 

Thank you

 

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INTERVIEW GUIDE – MAYOR

 

Name of Council………………………………………………………………….

 

Age Range 25 – 30 30-35 35-45 45 and above

 

No of years in service…………………………………………………………….

 

Sex

 

1.What are the functions of a Mayor……………………………………………

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………….

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………….

 

2.

How many Councillors are there in your Council?…………………………………..

3.What are the functions of the Councilors?…………………………………………….

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………….

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………….

 

4.What are the roles of the Councilors…………………………………………

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………….

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………….

 

5.Do both Male and Female Councillors play the same roles or do their roles

 

differ?

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………….

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………….

 

6.What are the key management positions within your Councilors (staff)?

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………….

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………….

 

7.No of Men Women

 

8.Do you follow particular criteria for selecting management staff?

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………….

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………….

 

9.Does your Council carry out training activities for its staff

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………….

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

10.

What is the participation rate ?Men Women

11.What is the selection criteria for training of staff?

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

12.What public facilities does your Council provide to the community? Who

 

benefit to men or women?

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

13.What community services do your council under take?

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

14. A)- What roles do men play?…………………………………………………………………

 

B)-What roles do women play?……………………………………………………………..

 

15. Are Council statistics of community needs collected on basis of gender?……

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

16.What percentage of men and women are beneficiaries of such services?

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

17. How do you identify community needs? On basis of particular groups?

 

Which groups of men? Of women?

 

……………………………………………………………………………………

 

……………

 

……………………………………………………………………………………

 

……………

 

……………………………………………………………………………………

 

……………

 

18.Do you take any specific action to target particular groups in the community

 

for council services/projects/ Men how? , Women how?

 

……………………………………………………………………………………

 

……………………………………………………………………………………

 

……………………………………………………………………………………

 

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19.Do you have any forum for consultative meetings in the community? – What

 

percentage of men participate,of women?

 

……………………………………………………………………………………

 

-What role do they play?…………………………………………………………

 

20.What are the sources of Council Revenue?

 

……………………………………………………………………………………

 

……………………………………………………………………………………

 

……………………………………………………………………………………

 

21.How does the community benefit from Council?

 

……………………………………………………………………………………

 

……………………………………………………………………………………

 

……………………………………………………………………………………

 

22. Do you have any budgetary allocation for gender –specific activities (i.e

 

that ensure the equality between men and women?)

 

……………………………………………………………………………………

 

……………………………………………………………………………………

 

……………………………………………………………………………………

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

FOR LOCAL PARTNERS OF MAYORS

 

1.What are the different services for which you require partners/ (Area of

 

Partnership)?…………………………………………………………………………………..

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

2.For how long have you worked with such partners?

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

3.Who are some of your partners?………………………………………………………………

 

4.What criteria do you follow in selecting your partners?……………………………..

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

Questionnaire for Council Councillors

 

Sex of Respondent

 

Age

 

Educational / Professional Background…………………………………………..

 

Marital Status……………………………………………………………………..

 

Family Size……………………………………………………………………….

 

Province of Origin

 

1.Name of Council

 

2.No of Councillors Male Female

 

3.Executive (Mayor/ Management), No of Male Female

 

4.Mayor Male Female

 

5.What are the functions of the Council?…………………………………………………..

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

6.Why did your become a councilor?

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

7.How were you selected?…………………………………………………………………………

 

8.What does it take to become a Councilor?……………………………………………….

 

9.What is the role of a Councillor?………………………………………………………………

 

MUDEC: enhancing development through responsive governance

 

MF

 

18 – 35

 

36 – 45

 

45 and above

 

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10.What is your role?…………………………………………………………………………………

 

11.Have you been trained as a councilor…………………………………………

 

 

 

If yes, on what?………………………………………………………………………….

 

 

 

 

If no…………………………………………………………………..

12.What benefits do you have as a Councilor?…………………………………………

 

13.What services/activities/projects your council has executed in the last 12

 

months?………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

 

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

14.What role did women play in bringing about this?

 

15.How did it benefit them?…………………………………………………………………..

 

16.How are decisions taken in your Council?…………………………………………..

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

17.If this Council was led by a member of the opposite sex, what would be the

 

situation?………………………………………………………………………………………………..

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

18.Are you satisfied with the present leadership…………………………………

 

 

 

If Yes,why?……………………………………………………………………………………..

 

 

 

 

If No, what can be done

 

 

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Questionnaire

 

For Council Staff

 

Sex of Respondents

 

Age group

 

Educational / Professional Background…………………………………………..

 

Marital Status……………………………………………………………………..

 

Family Size……………………………………………………………………….

 

Province of Origin……………………………….Province……………………..

 

Name of Council…………………………………Province……………………..

 

1. How long have you been a staff in this Council……………………………….

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

2.What is your opinion within the Council………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

3.What are your functions?………………………………………………………………………..

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

4.Are you satisfied with your criteria?………………………………………………………..

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

5.Have you been trained for this position?…………………………………………………..

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

6.If Yes on what…………………………………………………………………

 

MUDEC: enhancing development through responsive governance

 

MF

 

18 – 35

 

36 – 45

 

45 and above

 

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When…………………………………………………………………..

 

Where………………………………………………………………….

 

7.If No , why not?………………………………………………………………………………………

 

8.Is the room for advancement?

 

9.How are the decision taken within the Council (Process)?……………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

10. Are female and male staffs consulted in the process above?

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

11.What do you think are the specific needs for men and women in your

 

coouncil (office)?……………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

12.Are the needs and interest of male and female staff taken into consideration

 

by management?………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

13.If Yes. How?……………………………………………………………………………………….

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

14. If No, why not?……………………………………………………………………………….

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

15. Has this Council ever benefited from FEICOM?…………………………….

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

16. How

 

………………………………………………………………………………………

…………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

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Interview Guide for Senior Divisional Officer

 

Introduction:

 

Name Sex

 

Marital Status

 

Educational Level

 

Demographic Information………………………………………………………

 

Location………………………….Division………………….Province…………

 

1.How long have you been supervisiong the Council within your area ?

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

2.What constituteds your supervisory activities?

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

3.How many councils in your area are headed by women?

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

4.Why is the situation like this?

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

5.What activities are being carried out by your office to ensure that gender

 

equality in the Councils under your jurisdiction?

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

6.Are there are problems that mitigate against gender equality in Local

 

government?If Yes, what are they?

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

7.What can be done to solve the problem mentioned above?

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

MUDEC: enhancing development through responsive governance

 

Married

 

Single

 

Divorced

 

Separated

 

MF

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

8.Do you think it is necessary for actions to be taken to ensure gender equality

 

in local government?

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

If Yes, why?

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

9.What suggestions can be made to CEFAM as regards to gender equality in

 

Local government training?

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

THANKS

 

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FEICOM H/Q

 

Demographic data………………………………………………………………

 

Personal data……………………………………………………………………

 

Introduction:

 

Technical

 

Financial

 

Others

 

1. When was FEICOM created?…………………………………………………………………..

 

2.Why was FEICOM created?…………………………………………………………………….

 

3.FEICOM is said to provide assistance to Councils, what type of assistance do

 

you give to Councils……………………………………………………………

 

4.What are the activities of FEICOM?……………………………………………………….

 

5.How is FEICOM organised?……………………………………………………………………

 

6.What councils do you assist……………………………………………………

 

No Urban No Headed by Male

 

No Rural No Headed by Female

 

7.What are the activities funded by FEICOM?

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

Interview Guide for International Partners

 

Introduction:

 

Demographic Data

 

Personal Data

 

1.What councils do you worl with

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

2.How long have you been working with Councils……………………………

 

3.What type of partnership do you have with these Councils…………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

Technical

 

Financial

 

Others

 

4.What are the areas of partnership?…………………………………………………………

 

5.How many of these Councils are headed by women and men………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

6.Is there any difference between Councils headed by women and men?

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

If Yes……………………………………………………………….

 

7.What do you think is responsible for the low No of women in Local

 

government?

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

8. What can be done to solve this problem………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

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Gender Audit of Local Governance in Cameroon

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

9.What role can your organisation play in ensuring gender equality in local

 

government

 

…………………………………………………………………………………

………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

 

10. What can CEFAM do to ensure gender equality in local government

 

training ?…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

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Restitution of Gender Audit CEFAM

RESTITUTION OF GENDER AUDIT CARRIED OUT BY CEFAM

29 to 30 June 2006

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

June, 2006

 

 

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Introduction                                                                                                                             03

 

 

 

Module I: Introduction to workshop                                                                                              04

 

 

 

Module II Presentation of findings                                                                                               09

 

 

 

Module III: Strategies to mainstream gender                                                                                13

 

 

 

 

Module IV: Action plan                                                                                                               18

 

 

 

Annexe                                                                                                                                     20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Introduction

 

Considering the fact that sustainable development can be best achieved if development is human friendly, which in turn calls for participation. Considering the fact that councils are charged with the responsibility of ensuring the socio – economic and cultural development of local communities. This brings to the limelight the importance of mainstreaming gender in council institutions and projects, with the aim of ensuring an equitable participation of men and women in the development process of their locality leading to good governance and effective democracy at the local level. 

 

CEFAM being the sole government institution charged with the responsibility of training council personnel and council administrators.

In order to improve upon its functioning CEFAM carried out a gender audit inCameroonin 2003 and today opted to invite other actors or partners in local governance for a restitution workshop.

 

This audit had as

 

Global objective:

      To identify gender gaps/imbalances/ inequalities in Local Governance and make recommendations for mainstreaming gender in CEFAM training programmes.

 

Specific Objectives:

      To investigate gender issues in local government training;

      To identify gender gaps in CEFAM and its outreach activities;

      To determine what constraints/problems CEFAM faces in mainstreaming gender;

      To identify gender gaps in local council activities and management;

      To make recommendations for gender mainstreaming in local government training;

      To propose a methodology for the development of an appropriate gender sensitive curriculum for mainstreaming gender into local government

 

Objectives of the restitution workshop:

 

      To present the results of the audit to partners and decision makers

      Share experiences

      Identify strategies to mainstream gender in CEFAM as well as in councils

      Identify partners willing to participate in the implementation of strategies identified.

 

This report presents the results of the restitution workshop

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Module I: Introduction of the workshop

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


The restitution workshop started with words of welcome from the director of CEFAM, Mr.   who started by giving words of appreciation to the participants present for honouring his invitation. He encouraged participants to use this opportunity to give their contribution which to him will help in improving upon the work done by the consultants of MUDEC who carried out the audit.

 

 

This was followed with the introduction of participants, whereby each participant had to give the following elements:

 

  • Name
  • Organisation
  • Function

 

1.2       Overall objective

The above restitution objectives were presented and validated by participants.

 

1.3       PROGRAMME

In order to achieve the global objective, the program below was presented to participants.

Module I

 

 

Introduction to Workshop

Module II

 

Presentation of findings

Module III

 

Strategies to mainstream gender

Module IV

 

Action plan for way forward

Module V

 

Conclusion and evaluation

 


1.4               TIME SCHEDULE

 

The following daily schedule was agreed upon:

 

Day 1

 

Day 2

 

Time frame

Activities

Time frame

Activities

09h00 – 11h30
  • Welcome speeches
  • Introduction to workshop

 

8h30 – 11h00
  • Restitution results of group work (continues)
  • Action plan

 

11h30 – 12h00 Coffee break

 

11h00 – 11h30 Coffee break
12h45 – 2h30pm
  • Presentation of findings
  • Discussions
  • Strategies to mainstream gender (group work)

 

11h30 – 1h30pm
  • Action plan
  • Conclusion and evaluation
2h30 – 3h30pm Lunch  break

 

2h00 —- Lunch

Closing

3h30 – 4h30
  • Strategies to mainstream gender continues (group work)
  • Restitution results of group work

 

   

 


1.5        WORKING METHODS

 

To maximize understanding and participation STRATEGIES! uses a variety of methods as presented below. These methods were presented and discussed in plenary, to enable participants become familiar with them.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                   

      

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                

 

Working Methods

E

V

A

L

U

A

T

I

O

N

VISUALISATION

   F

   U

   N

 

Plenary

Group Work

PARTICIPATION

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Participation, fun, evaluations and visualisation are permanent and transversal principles, which run through out the entire length of the workshop.

 

1.6        SUCCESS CONDITIONS

In order to ensure harmony during the workshop, the following conditions were presented and validated by participants

 

·    Be punctual

·    Participate actively

  • Nobody knows everything, and everybody knows something, so…
  • Listen actively
  • Respect one another’s ideas
    • Turn off all cell phones

 


1.7       VISUALIZATION RULES

To use visualization effectively as a working tool, facilitate reading and permit information management, the following rules were presented to the participants:

  • One idea per card
  • 3 lines at most per card
  • Write visibly
  • Use the bold side of the marker
  • Close markers after use
  • Return marker at the end of the day

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Module II : Presentation of findings

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


2.1. General presentation of the evaluation context

This module started with the presentation of the evaluation context which included the following elements:

  • Objectives and expected outcomes
  • Scope (focus, time frame, geographic coverage, subject of the study)
  • Limitations and
  • Methodology

NB for details of these elements please refer to the audit report

 

 

 

2.2. Strengths of CEFAM

CEFAM since its creation in December 1977 remains the sole government institution responsible for building the capacities of local administrators (both elected and appointed) and the rest of council personnel. Based on the audit and other facts the following are registered as main successes or strength of CEFAM:

      It focuses on improving local governance and promoting democratic practices at the base

      At the time of the study, the institution was headed by a woman

      During the restitution CEFAM  though headed by a man. he participated during the audit exercise and expressed his great concern in gender mainstreaming in local governance which is even further demonstrated through his doing everything to ensure that this workshop was organised. As well in his opening speech his position was quite clear – gender mainstreaming a means to achieve sustainable development.

      Good mastering in the field of local governance

      An available and committed management team and staff

      The institution holds and is currently playing a strategic role in the decentralisation process.

 

 

Not withstanding the following gender gaps or imbalances were presented as findings of the audit.

 

2.3. Gender gaps

Following are the gender gaps as presented by the auditors(which were either within or viewed by) and classified under:

  • CEFAM
  • Councils
  • Supervisory authorities
  • Partners

 


2.3.1          Gender gaps in CEFAM

 

Organisation and management:

  • The policies and strategies are gender neutral
  • Only 2 out of 15 boards of directors’ members are women (13.5%)
  • Women form only 20% of management staff (during the study, presently all 5 members of management team are men)
CEFAM staff:

  • Only 2 out of 15 part time teachers are females
  • Only 27.7% of permanent staff are women
  • Women form 20% of staff on secondment
  • Women mostly play support roles and occupy low status positions
Curriculum:

  • Courses offered were not gender sensitive
  • Majority of staff are not gender sensitive
  • There was no course on gender and development
Trainees:

  • 30% of trainees by 2003 were women
Library:

  • No books on gender and development

 

Constraints faced by CEFAM

 

  • Poor visibility of CEFAM(Marketing)
  • Low female representation in councils
  • Limited gender awareness
  • Most mayors prefer male labour
  • Low education of women
  • Female council workers may lose their jobs when their husbands are transferred
  • Male domination and hostilities
  • The socialisation process; women believe in menial jobs
  • Cultural factors: myths and beliefs about women
  • Women’s triple roles
   

 

 

2.3.2          Gender gaps in councils

Elected body:

  • 23.9% of councillors are females
  • Female mayors form 3.3% (11 out of 339 councils are headed by women) – presently we have 12 female mayors out of 339 mayors – 3.5%
Staff:

  • Very few women are found in decision making positions in councils
  • Only 22.9% of management positions in councils are occupied by women
  • Women form 32.2% of council staff
  • Most female council staff are assistant to
  • Women form the majority of council staff with no training
Training:

  • Decisions by mayors on whom to sponsor in CEFAM may not be gender sensitive
  • Non of the council staff had a training on gender and development
  • Council staff are not gender sensitive

 

Difficulty faced by female staff:

  • Family size may be a limitation for women (over 40% of council staff have 6 – 10 persons in the house

 

 


2.3.3          Gender gaps at the level of the supervisory authorities.

Role:

  • Appoints BOD and management staff
  • Allocates and approves CEFAM’s budget
  • Supervises
  • Evaluates CEFAM

 

Gender gaps:

  • appoints mostly males for BOD and management positions
  • budget allocation is not gender sensitive
  • does not insist for a quota for female trainees
  • MINATD’s policy on the constitution of list does not seem to be gender sensitive.

 

 

2.3.4        Gender gaps identified by Partners

International partners:

  • GTZ – ADEC program
  • PACDDU
  • HelvetasCameroon
  • Friedrich Ebert Foundation
  • SNV
Gender gaps identified by these partners:

  • Low education levels
  • The women factor
  • Political factor
  • Socio-cultural factors
  • The legal framework was not conducive
  •  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Module III: Strategies to mainstream gender

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


The following strategies to mainstream gender at various levels  have been put together based on the results of the group work carried out by participants to identify strategies to mainstream gender and the recommendations provided by the consultants who carried out the gender audit.

 

3.1 Strategies to mainstream gender in CEFAM[1]

  • CEFAM should develop and implement a gender policy which is reflected in all aspects of it’s daily functioning
  •  

Such a strategy could include the following:

 

Level / strategies

Key elements leading to strategies attainment

Expected outcomes or results

Organisation and management

  • The number of female members in the board of directors be at least 40%
  • Women should constitute at least 40% of management staff
  • Board members and staff trained on gender

 

  • MINADT should request for 2 persons from the ministries insisting that one should be a female
  • Planned programs for gender sensitisation of management and staff
  • MINATD should propose names of women for management positions
  • Planned programs for gender sensitisation of BOD members
  • CEFAM should put in place a gender focal point

 

  • Women’s representation increased
  • BOD members easily allocate budget for GAD activities
  • CEFAM’s policies and strategies are gender sensitive

 

CEFAM staff:

  • At least 40% of training staff be women
  • At least 50% of support staff be women
  • Gender sensitisation and training program for CEFAM staff implemented
  •  
  • Request for more female staff
  • More female trainees recruited
  • Management can use informal means to advertise jobs
  • Number of female staff increased
  • CEFAM staff is gender sensitive
   
Curriculum:

  • A core course on gender and local governance be introduced
  • Integrate gender in all courses offered in the curriculum
  • Refresher courses on gender should be organised for different level of staff and clients

 

  • Training manuals be developed on gender and local governance
  • The library be updated with books on gender and related topics
  • Gender orientation integrated into CEFAM’s curriculum
 
Trainees (students):

  • At least 40% of the intake into CEFAM should be reserved for female candidates,
  • 40% regional balance be taken into consideration during intake into CEFAM

 

  • Gender sensitisation programs for councils especially mayors

 

  • More female students in CEFAM
Budget:

  • Gender budgeting

 

  • Allocate budget for gender specific activities

 

  • CEFAM’s program is gender sensitive
Marketing of CEFAM:

  • CEFAM should develop and strengthen partnership with key institutions in and out of the country

 

   

 

 

3.2 Strategies to mainstream gender in councils

 

 

Elaborate and implement gender policies

 

Level / strategies

Key elements leading to strategies attainmant

Expected outcomes or results

Elected body:

  • National policy; political quota at 40/60
  • Gender sensitisation and training program for elected officials
  •  
  • Encourage and empower female mayors association
  • Programs for more women to go in for elections be organised (Mobilise women candidates and voters for women candidates)
  • Sensitise women to join politics in numbers
  • Present gender alternating list
  • Women head list and vie for mayors
  • More women mayors
  • Council programs are gender oriented
   

 

 

Staff:

  • Staff recruitment should be 50/50
  • Capacity building on GAD for councils
  • Create gender and local governance focal points

 

 

  • Equal appointments to posts of responsibility
  • FEICOM should give scholarships to female candidates
  • Recommend more women for professional training – CEFAM
  • Preference for admission and/or recruitment to female candidates
  • More women in higher positions in councils
  • Council staff is gender sensitive
 
Projects and programs

Ensure quantitative and qualitative participation at all levels of project cycle

 

  • Gender promotion in communities by councils
  • Build the capacities of women.
  • Review cultural values

 

Increased participation of women in council activities
Council budget

Implement gender budgeting

  • Budgetary allocation for GAD activities
  • Train related staff on gender budgeting

 

Increased gender specific activities
Contracts

  • Increase representation in tender boards
  • Award contracts to female entrepreneurs
  • Tender boards be chaired by women

 

Ensure women, have access to contracts by:

–  Providing information

–  Training

–   Reviewing  conditions and making them progressive

 

More women have access to council benefits – contracts

 

 

 

3.3 Strategies to promote gender mainstreaming in councils

  • Legalise quota of at least 30% representation
  • Appointments are fixed at 4O% quota for BOD and management staff.
  • Trainees quota be fixed at 55% for female candidate intake
  • Gender sensitive budget within their various institutions; (15% budget allocation for gender specific activities)
  • Gender unit or focal point created within these institutions
  • Elaborate and implement gender policy.

 


3.4 Strategies to promote gender mainstreaming in councils

 

 

Local partners International partners
Building capacities:

  • Sensitise and organise training programs for women (leadership and management, existing laws, election process, cultural values, gender, income generating activities, etc.)
  • Carry out sensitisation programs to the general public especially men for a change of attitudes (traditional rulers, political leaders, husbands)
  • Organise refresher courses for female workers
  • Lobby at the level of the government the change of unfavourable laws
Building capacities through program support:

  • Finance gender and local governance activities
  • Provide scholarships to female students in CEFAM

 

Supporting the creation of facilities

  • Sponsor the production of manuals in gender and local governance
  • Sponsor the creation of facilities to care for babies and children
  • Sponsor the creation of shelter homes for battered women

 

Technical assistance:

  • Provide technical assistance

 

 

 

During the workshop an exhaustive list of partners was identified in a working group. They were as follows:

Partners

International

Local

  • GTZ – ADEC program
  • PACDDU
  • HelvetasCameroon
  • Friedrich Ebert Foundation
  • SNV
Institutional:

  • FEICOM
  • MINDUH
  • MINPLADAT
  • MINDAF
  • Public Work
  • MINADER
  • HEALTH
  • UCCC
  • PNDP
  • Etc.
Private

  • Enterprises
  • Local NGOs
  • Women forums and networks
 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Module IV : Action plan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Action plan

 

Key activities

Actors

Roles

Resources

Expected results

Appropriate time frame

Develop  gender and local governance training manuals  

CEFAM

 

 

Coordinating

   

 

manuals

 

 

December 2006

SNV

other partners (MUDEC)

–      Technical support

–      Content elaboration

 

 
 

PNDP

 

Financing

 

 
Sensitisation ands training of mayors          
Gender training for CEFAM          
Introduce a course on gender and local governance          
Acquire documentation on gender          
Mobilisation for women political leadership          
Train council staff and councillors          

 

 

Due to time constraint a committee was set up to complete the action an plan. Following are members of the committee and their role.

 

Follow –up committee

Members:

      CEFAM

      MUDEC

      SNV

      STRATEGIES

      MAYOR Konye Council

 

Role:

      Finalise action plan and make it SMART

 

 

      Recommendation: Meet before the 15th of Jully, 2006

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ANNEXE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Restitution of group work

 

Strategies to mainstream gender

 

Group 1: In CEFAM

  • Develop gender policy which is reflected in all aspects of CEFAM’s daily life (it was precised in plenary that CEFAM had to propose and lobby for such a policy to be adopted by hierarchy at various levels)
  • Elaborate strategies to implement the gender policy

 

Strategies:

  • The number of female members in the board be at least 40%
  • Women should constitute at least 40% of management staff
  • At least 40% of training staff be women
  • At least 50% of support staff be women
  • Gender budgeting: allocate budget for gender specific needs
  • At least 40% of the intake into CEFAM should be reserved for female candidates,
  • 40% regional balance be taken into consideration during intake into CEFAM

 

Curriculum:

  • Specific and relevant courses on gender be included in the curriculum
  • Refresher courses on gender should be organised for different level of staff and clients
  • Introduce elements from users through a needs assessment

 

Library:

  • Documentation on gender be acquired for the library
  • CEFAM should make itself better known and increase opportunities for women
  • CEFAM should develop and strengthen partnership with institutions in the socialisation process.

Group members: Fon, Minang, Njie, Bemoute, Pone

 

Group 2: In Councils

Elected:

  • Sensitise women to join politics in numbers
  • National policy; political quota at 40/60
  • Present gender alternating list
  • Women head list and vie for mayors
  • Women should stop “PHD – put her down” syndrome
  • Encourage and empower female mayors association
  • Organise neighbourhood assemblies early enough
  • Mobilise women candidates and voters for women candidates
Employment:

  • Staff recruitment should be 50/50
  • Equal appointments to posts of responsibility
Economic empowerment:

  • Award contracts to female entrepreneurs
  • Tender boards be chaired by women
  • Create gender and local governance focal points
  • Elaborate and implement gender policies
Training:

  • Recommend more women for professional training – CEFAM
  • Preference for admission to female candidates
  • Council staff training on gender and development
Large family size constraints:

  • Review cultural values
  • Female staff be organised to meet up with societal roles

Group members: Eshie N, Nalowa, Atemnkeng, Mbongale, Nlo, Djoujue

Group 3: Supervisory authorities.

 

  • Awareness raising
  • Appointments fixed at 4O% quota for BOD and management staff.
  • Gender sensitive budget; 15% budget allocation
  • Trainees quota of 55% intake
  • Legalise quota of at least 30% representation
  • Gender unit or focal point created
  • Elaborate and implement gender policy.

 

Group 4: Partners.

 

Local partners International partners
Educational level
  • Sensitise and train in specific fields
  • Organise refresher courses for female workers
  • Sensitise and train women on leadership skills in rural areas
  • Sponsor training of female trainees in CEFAM and other specialised institutions
  •  
 
Women factors
  • Sensitise and organise educational programs
  • Train on leadership
 
Political factors
  • Sensitise political parties
  • Lobbying and advocacy
  • sponsorship of female candidates
 
Socio-cultural factors
 
  • Sponsor the creation of facilities to care for babies and children
  • Sponsor and train the management of income generating activities
  • Sponsor the creation of shelter homes for battered women
  • Sponsor sensitisation programs to change attitudes of men, e.g. for traditional rulers, political leaders husbands, etc.
The legal framework
  • Sensitise women on existing laws
  • Lobby at the government to change unfavourable laws
 
   

 

Partners

International

Local

  • GTZ – ADEC program
  • PACDDU
  • HelvetasCameroon
  • Friedrich Ebert Foundation
  • SNV
Institutional:

  • FEICOM
  • MINDUH
  • MINPLADAT
  • MINDAF
  • Public Work
  • MINADER
  • HEALTH
  • UCCC
  • PNDP
Private Local NGOs

Women forums

 

 

PNDP:

The National Coordinator of PNDP expressed the possibility of her financing:

  • The production of training manus
  • Capacity building for mayors

 

 


Recommendation from Experts

Recommendations

Expected outcomes

CEFAM organisation and management

  • MINADT should request for 2 persons from the ministries insisting on one should be a female
  • Planned programs for gender sensitisation of management and staff
  • MINATD should propose names of women for management positions
  • Planned programs for gender sensitisation of BOD members

Make provision for private candidates.

  • Women’s representation increased
  • BOD members easily allocate budget for GAD activities
  • CEFAM’s policies and strategies are gender sensitive
  • Gender orientation to CEFAM curriculum
  • CEFAM puts in place a gender focal point

CEFAM Staffing

  • CEFAM should request for more female staff
  • Management can use informal means to advertise jobs
  • More female trainees recruited
  • More female staff recruited
 

Local government training

  • Gender sensitisation program for CEFAM staff
  • A core course on gender and local governance
  • Training manuals be developed on gender and local governance
  • Gender sensitisation programs for councils especially mayors
  • The library updated with books on gender and others
  • CEFAM curriculum is gender sensitive
  • More female students recommended and sponsored by mayors
 

Councils

  • Capacity building on GAD for councils
  • Programs for more women to go in for elections be organised
  • Women should strategise into get to higher positions
  • Council staff be trained on GAD and others
  • Gender promotion in communities by councils
  • Budgetary allocation for GAD activities
  • FEICOM should give scholarships to female candidates
  • More women become mayors
  • More women in higher positions in councils
 

Partners

  • International partners should finance gender and local governance activities
  • International partners should provide technical assistance
  • International partners should sponsor the development of manuals
  • International partners should give scholarships to female students
  • More female students trained
  • More people gender sensitised
  • More women in strategic positions in local governance
 

General evaluation

One thing I learned

One thing I did not like

Suggestion for improvement

      Need for us to be gender sensitive

      Sensitisation on gender issues is very important and necessary in local development

      The issue of gender in local governance

      How CEFAM functions

      Openness in discussions

      Mainstreaming gender is an appropriate strategy to improve local governance

      Strategies in mainstreaming gender in development

      The woman must play a role in the economy and political life. No more domination

      Gender awareness

      Introducing a core course on gender in CEFAM will help to reduce gender gaps

      Group work

      Participatory spirit

      Recognition of women’s capabilities

      About CEFAM and gender implementation

      Gender mainstreaming in local governance

      The role of CEFAM

      Process to into CEFAM or to take part in the competitive examination

      Definition of mainstreaming

      Gender is a key issue to handle in decentralisation.

      Over belabouring an idea thus losing consistency

      The absence of many women

      Some expectations were unrealistic and not pointing enough

      Time management

      Absence of most partners

      Long discussions on futile matters

      Few mayors were present

      Time management not the best

      Absence of time keeper

      Time frame for the workshop was too short

      Indiscriminate speaker by others when someone has the floor

      Time management

      Absence of a time keeper

      We must always keep in mind evolution in our social context

      Hope CEFAM accept suggestions

      More females in other local institutions be invited

      More order and silence

      Adequate preparation of mayors in future workshops

      Be bilingual next time

      Guarantee presence and participation of key actors

      The moderator should not give room to disordered participants

      The follow-up committee should create an activity on the visibility of CEFAM

      Association the media

      Contact addresses for all participants

      Realisation of action plan

      Send out documentation beforehand

      Action plan be implemented

      Final document should be sent to all concern

      Time management should be improved.

      More local and international partners be invited next time to take commitments 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


List of participants

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



[1] CEFAM’s main role is to propose and carry out effective lobbying for such a policy to be adopted by hierarchy at various levels)

 


MUDEC & WEEP collaboration

Table of Contents

 

Table of Contents…….. ……1

List of Abbreviations. 2

1.0 Executive Summary. 3

 

2.0 The WEEP …     ………….……………………………………………………………5

2.1 Background. 5

2.2  Goal……………………………………………………………………………………5

2.3  Objectives: 5

2,4 Planned Activities 2011 – 2012. ………..5

 

3.0  External Evaluation (purpose, objectives, methodology) …9

3.1 Purpose…………………………………………………………………………………9

3.2 Objectives………………………………………………………………………………9

3.3 Scope of the Evaluation ………………………………………………………………..9

3.4 Expected results and Deliverables………………………………………………………9

3.5 Methodology & Operational Guide……………………………………………………..9

3.6 Findings & Analysis Based on Evaluation Objectives………………………………..13

3.6.1 Assess the project realization and the impact it has on the project area…………….14

3.6.2 Assess the effectiveness and efficiency of the project management………………..17

3.6.2.1 WEEP Organizational Structure…………………………………………………..17

3.6.2.2 WEEP Staff……………………………………………………………………….18

3.6.2.3 WEEP Equipment…………………………………………………………………18

3.6.2.4 Analysis on the effectiveness of project management…………………………….18

3.6.2.5 Analysis on the efficiency of project management………………………………..18

3.6.3 Assess the sustainability of the project outcomes after the end of the project phase.20

3.6.4 Enable the project build on the results/recommendations of the evaluation and to

    consolidate the work that has been done in the previous project areas of Fako and Meme        divisions……………………………………………………………………………………..22

4.0 Challenges……………………………………………………………………………….24

5.0 Recommendations……………………………………………………………………….24

6.0 Conclusion……………………………………………………………………………….25

7.0 Annexes………………………………………………………………………………….26

7.1 Call for Tender……………………………………………………………………………26

7.2 Evaluation Team ………..……………………………………………………………….27

7.3 List of Persons Contacted………………………………………………………………..27

7.4 Photo Gallery…………………………………………………………………………….33

7.5 Samples of Data Collection Tools…………………………………………………………..35

 

 

 

 

LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS

 

AFFCO                       Association for Female Political Leaders

BftW                           Bread for the World

CEFAM                      Local Government Training Centre

CWF                           Christian Women Fellowship

ELECAM                   Elections Board in Cameroon

GCE                           General Certificate of Education

HIV/AIDS                  Human Immune Virus / Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome

MDG                           Millennium Development Goals

MINPROFF                Ministry of Women Affairs and the Family

MINAS                       Ministry of Social Affairs

MUDEC                     Municipal Development Counseling Group              

NGO                           Non-Governmental Organization

PCC                            Presbyterian Church in Cameroon.

SWOT                         Strengths Weaknesses Opportunities Threats

UNIFEM                    United Nations Fund for Women

WEEP                         Women’s Education and Empowerment Program

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1.0 Executive Summary

The Women Education Empowerment Program of the Presbyterian Church in Cameroon executed a series of activities in Meme Division of the South West Region with financing from Bread for the World in Stuttgart, Germany. The goal was to increase women participation in development and decision making processes in several target communities. A total of twelve wide ranging activities including sensitization meetings, trainings, focus discussions, radio programs and dissemination of printed materials that centered on Leadership, Political Participation and Women’s Rights (land ownership, inheritance, reproduction, polygamy, marriages, education of the girl child) were implemented in seventeen (17) communities between January 2011 and December 2012. About twelve thousand (12.000) persons were directly or indirectly reached (85% women) while men, youths, traditional and religious authorities constituted the other 15%.

The services of MUDEC Group (Service Provider) were retained by WEEP management to conduct an external evaluation at the end of the project phase. The evaluation objectives included:

  1. Assess the project realization and the impact it has on the project area
  2. Assess the effectiveness and efficiency of the project management
  3. Assess the sustainability of the project outcomes after the end of the project phase
  4. Enable the project build on the results/recommendations of the evaluation and to

    consolidate the work that has been done in the previous project areas of Fako and Meme        divisions.

MUDEC Group engaged five resource persons (3 females and 2 males) to conduct the evaluation. The methodology adopted for the exercise were centered on principles that ensured maximum participation of the target beneficiaries, allowed for triangulation of collected information, gender differentiation of respondents to questionnaires and representative sampling. The sample size included beneficiaries from twelve (12) communities representing 70% of total seventeen (17) communities reached during project execution.  300 questionnaires were utilized and twelve (12) focus groups were constituted and interviewed within twelve (12) communities.

The evaluation was guided by an operational technique including; knowledge of the organization (literature review); collection of information through questionnaires and focus group consultations; data analysis, interpretation and restitution; capitalization and presentation of reports (in hard and soft copies).

This evaluation report includes quantitative and qualitative analyses. The WEEP planned to organize twelve (12) key activities within seventeen (17) communities. These were successfully carried out representing 100% execution rate. Qualitatively, the evaluation observed that about 60% of beneficiaries (both men and women) still find it difficult to implement knowledge gained largely due to low economic abilities for the women and resistance to change long standing socio cultural habits on the part of the men.  95% of beneficiaries publicly expressed appreciation of the efforts of the WEEP and indicated their willingness to contribute toward the implementation of project ideals.  60% of the men including traditional authorities are culprits or perpetrators of these negative cultural values of polygamy, resistance to female inheritance of land, limited discussions on reproductive rights and the education of the girl child. On issues of leadership and governance, all three female councilors interviewed were actively involved in increasing female participation during the upcoming legislative and municipal elections while 95% of female respondents indicated that they will vote for female candidates during the elections. About 60% of women interviewed had already registered to vote. Seventeen (17) community facilitators have been put in place and they are continuing the process of sensitizing the target communities on issues of women rights. The evaluation also observed that project management comprised of dedicated individuals who were largely committed to the success of the project. The evaluation observed an internal control system which contributed to the efficiency of project management. Our findings indicated that the total budget for the project phase under review was 32.750.000 FRS. Given that about twelve thousand (12,000) persons (85% women) were reached directly by project activities, we can say that WEEP spent about two thousand seven hundred and thirty francs (2.730 FRS) per beneficiary which is relatively minimal. Project execution was therefore effective and efficient

 Seven (07) project outcomes were identified and their potentials for sustainability analyzed. The evaluation reveals that a pool of female activists and the trained community facilitators are within the project area and are actively engaged in activities that reinforce the ideals of the WEEP project. Female councilors have secure budgetary allocations for gender issues that can enable better collaboration between the councils and WEEP.

 It is highly recommended that WEEP should receive support for another phase with activities that meet the urgent felt needs for economic empowerment of the women in Fako and Meme Divisions of the South West Region. The support should include trainings as well as the provision of Seed Capital which ranges between 25.000FCFA and 50.000FCFA. This will tremendously give leverage and status to the women and enable them to make meaningful contributions in their homes, their Church and communities. WEEP management should engage a policy to maximize visibility of project activities through a website and actively seek alternative funding partners who could swell their program activities thus increasing their ability to serve more beneficiaries.

 

 

2.0The Women Education and Empowerment Program (WEEP).

2.1 Background:

The Women’s Education and Empowerment Program (WEEP) is a project of the Presbyterian Church in Cameroon (PCC) supported financially and technically (through a Transfer of Function office in Cameroon) by Bread for the World (BftW) in Stuttgart, Germany for which a Cooperation Agreement was signed between the BftW and PCC on February 22, 2005 and March 16th, 2005 respectively by the two organizations.

Phases one and two of the project were executed in Fako Division between 2005 and 2008 while the third phase was executed between January 2009 and December 2010 in Meme Division of the South West Region of Cameroon. Project activities were extended(forth phase) to several more villages in Meme Division from January 2011 to December 2012 because of the demands of communities that share similar socio cultural challenges. This extension sought to address the multiple problems of inadequate gender representation in decision making structures, discriminatory traditional practices, poor access to reproductive and property rights, poverty and bad governance; notably by increasing women’s participation in development and decision making processes as well as creating awareness on gender relations in the traditional structures that promote discriminatory traditional practices that marginalize women.

 

2.1.       Goal:

To increase women’s participation in development and decision making processes in the society

2.2.Objectives:

  1. To increase women’s participation in decision making structures and local governance processes
  2. To reduce women’s ignorance about their legal, inheritance and reproductive rights and responsibilities
  3. To improve on gender awareness among traditional rulers
  4. Improve on the level of education of women and their economic status.

 

2.4 Planned Activities during 2011 & 2012 in seventeen (17) communities.

 

Results

Activities

Indicators

Responsible

Collaborators

Resources

Women’s participation in decision making and local governance processes is enhanced Conduct sensitization meetings on the political participation of the woman. 673 women in seven (07) communities in 2011 sensitized on the political participation of the woman Project Management Local authorities,

Women group leaders,

Technical services,

Teachers,

Churches

 

Resource persons,

Transportation,

Feeding,

Media,

Airtime.

Organize Workshops on Strengthening women’s strategies for political leadership in municipal and legislative 138 women trained on strategies for political leadership in three (03) council areas in 2011

 

Project Management NGOs,

Women’s groups,

Advocacy organizations

 

Hall,

Resource persons,

Lodging,

Feeding, working materials,

Transportation,

Communication, media coverage

Association of Meme Female Politicians created in 2011 Project Management South West Female Mayors / Councilors Conference Registration,

Annual dues.

Coach on Strategies for Female Mobilization in the upcoming elections.

 

45 members of the South West Female Mayors Conference coached on mobilization techniques in 2011 Project Management NGOs,

Women’s groups,

Advocacy organizations

 

Hall,

Resource persons,

Lodging,

Feeding, working materials,

Transportation,

Communication, media coverage

Women knowledge on Self Reliant development increased Train on Economic skills. 300 women trained on Soap making and Cake icing in six (06) communities in 2011 Project Management Women & Men groups, local associations Hal,

Lodging,

Feeding, working materials,

Transportation,

Communication, media coverage

Conduct Sensitization meetings on economic potentials of the woman. 765 women in seven (17) communities sensitized in 2011 on the economic potentials of the woman Project Management Women & Men groups, local associations Hal,

Lodging,

Feeding, working materials,

Transportation,

Communication, media coverage

Women’s ignorance about their legal inheritance and reproductive rights and responsibilities reduced Conduct Grassroots training workshops on Gender and Women’s Rights 1.754 women trained on Gender & Women’s Rights in seventeen (17) communities in 2011 & 2012 Project Management Women & Men groups, local associations Hal,

Lodging,

Feeding, working materials,

Transportation,

Communication, media coverage

  Conduct sensitization meetings on the Education of the girl child and the legalization of marriages. 1.500 women sensitized on the need to attend school and legalize marriage in seventeen communities in 2011 & 2012 Project Management Women Groups and Associations, Churches. MINPROFF, MINAS.

 

Writing materials,

Resource persons,

Scholarships,

Transportation,

Communication,

  Conduct Mass marriages. 15 couples including one Mayor legalized their marriages in Konye town in 2011 Project Management Konye Council Hall, Feeding, Transportation, working materials, media
  Workshop on men and women together for the fight against Gender Based Violence (GBV). 23 participants (17) women trained on GBV in three council areas in 2012 Project Management Women & Men groups, local associations Hall,

Lodging,

Feeding, working materials,

Transportation,

Communication, media coverage

  Conduct Workshop for Traditional Rulers on Promoting women’s access and control over natural resources. 62 Traditional Authorities from two municipalities trained on Women access & control of natural resources in 2012 Project Management Traditional Councils Hal, Lodging,

Feeding, working materials,

Transportation,

Communication, media coverage

  Produce & disseminate News letter 2000 newsletters distributed in seventeen communities between 2011 & 2012 Project Management Media,

MINPROFF

Finance,

Transportation,

Communication

 

  Held Participatory Review Meetings.

 

Review meetings involving 590 stakeholders held in nine communities in 2011 & 2012 Project Management Community Facilitators Hall,

Feeding, working materials,

Transportation,

Communication

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.0 External Evaluation

In order to ascertain the degree of implementation of the objectives, activities, expected results and the corresponding impact the project had on the beneficiaries, the services of MUDEC-Group, a Service Provider based in Buea were retained (after a competitive bidding process) by WEEP management to carry out an external evaluation project activities between January 2011 and December 2012.

3.1 Rational:

This evaluation was conducted to primarily examine the level of the project implementation in line with the proposal that was submitted to BftW and to assess the visible and invisible project impact on the lives and livelihoods of its target beneficiaries. The evaluation shows the extent to which the project goal has been attained and it assesses the potentials and challenges that were encountered during implementation. This evaluation has also appreciated the extent of change that the beneficiary population has witnessed as a result of the project and the new trends in the beneficiary communities.

Precisely, the evaluation weighted heavily on the aspects identified below:

  • The institutional structure of the project, its staff capacity and examine its visibility in the communities of the project area covered by the project.
  • The relevance of the project to the beneficiaries within the socio-cultural milieu.
  • The effectiveness of the approaches/strategies applied and the impact resulting from the project implementation at the level of organizational management.
  • The level of participation of the beneficiaries
  • The implementation of Mainstreaming gender and HIV/AIDS at program and organizational levels
  • The Sustainability strategies of WEEP.

3.2 Objectives:

  1. Assess the project realization and the impact it has on the project area
  2. Assess the effectiveness and efficiency of the project management
  3. Assess the sustainability of the project outcomes after the end of the project phase
  4. Enable the project build on the results/recommendations of the evaluation and to

    consolidate the work that has been done in the previous project areas of Fako and Meme        divisions.

3.3. Scope of the Evaluation:

      Project activities were executed in seventeen (17) communities including Konye Town, Mbakwa Supe, Dikomi, Lobangi, Kang Barombi, Mambanda, Matoh, Kake II, Mbonge Maromba, Small Ekombe, Kwakwa, Dieka, Mukonje, Kosala, Timber Road, Diongo and Mokoko CDC. The evaluation was conducted in twelve (12) communities (representing 70% coverage) including Konye Town, Mbakwa Supe, Dikomi, Lobangi, Kang Barombi, Mambanda, Matoh, Kake II, Mbonge Maromba, Small Ekombe, Kwakwa and Dieka.

3.4. Evaluation Deliverables:

  • Ten (10) hard copies of the evaluation report.
  • One soft copy on CD.

 

3.5. Methodology & Operational Guide:

 

The evaluation was guided by the Terms of Reference (TOR) which was provided by WEEP management with focus on the objectives in 3.2 above. MUDEC constituted three teams comprising five (05) resource persons (three females and two males) to facilitate the evaluation exercise.  In order to enhance objectivity and transparency, key data collection and interpretation principles were adopted:

–          Participation: The evaluation team made use of various participatory techniques and tools to enable the active participation of the individuals and/or groups concerned in the evaluation.

–          Representative Sampling: MUDEC adopted sampling techniques, especially the simple random sampling to select representative samples for information collection. 300 beneficiaries from twelve (12) villages were contacted for this exercise representing 70% of the total communities (17) that were reached by WEEP during the period under review.

–          Gender Differentiation: Gender specific impacts were analyzed to come out with the benefits of the projects for men, women and youths. This was also done to assess the impact of gender relations within the target communities.

–          Triangulation: The team endeavored to systematically diversify its sources of information so as to confirm perceptions for an accurate description of the actual situation. 12 focus groups were constituted (one per village) to enable triangulation of information collected from target beneficiaries through questionnaires.

 

No. Municipality Villages Questionnaires administered Women Men Youth Traditional Leaders
1 Konye

 

Konye Town 25 15 5 4 1
2 Mbakwa Supe 25 15 5 4 1
3 Dikomi 28 20 5 2 1
  Lobangi 18 10 5 2 1
3 Kumba Central Kang Barombi 22 15 5 2 0
4 Mambanda 26 15 5 5 1
  Matoh 32 20 5 5 2
5 Kake II 23 15 5 2 1
6 Mbonge

 

Mbonge Maromba 31 20 5 5 1
7 Small Ekombe 19 10 5 3 1
8 Kwakwa 23 15 5 2 1
9 Dieka 28 20 5 2 1
Total     300 190 60 38 12

 

Operational Guide for the Evaluation.

 

Sequence Objective Activity Content Methodology
1 To know WEEP Acquire Knowledge of the organization and project. -Exploitation of documents

Finalization of the guidelines/questionnaires and checklists for the evaluation.

–  Meet the officials in charge of the project- PCC Moderator, Development Secretary, Coordinator of WEEP and other relevant staff.

–   Choice of documents to consult

–  Exploit, and analyze the documents.

–  Ask for complementary information.

II To have an evaluative view of the personnel, socio cultural groups (especially women), collaborators on the WEEP. Collection of data and consultation with stake holders 1– Meetings with Management Board and collaborators.

-Philosophy, vision, strategies.

-Management, internal control mechanism

-Sustainability of the project.

– Level of execution or Results achieved so far.

-Approach to work: choice of mechanisms and decision-making processes of management.

-Sustainability of the project, ideas on gender issues, appreciation of results, impacts and relationships.

2.  Meeting with socio cultural groups and women

-Influence of the WEEP on the development of group activities

-Benefits of the project to stakeholders (beneficiaries)

-Impact of training  and other services received

 

-Participatory observations

-Semi structured interviews –focus group discussions, administration of questionnaires

-Cross-checking and comparison of data

III Present the project and organization the way the evaluators see it.

–  Make proposals, recommendations in line with sustainable development actions.

Analysis of data -Assemble data

-Treatment of collected data

-Preparation of recommendations.

-Write a draft report.

-Team discussions

-Assign task to individual team members

  Collected data and draft report are corrected and validated by stakeholders. Restitution of data -organize restitution workshop with stakeholders.

– Restitute the collected and Analyzed data

-Validate data during meeting

-Visualized Presentation of draft report in a restitution meeting.

-Discussion/ improvements in plenary where necessary.

IV Help WEEP to have a concrete document that serves as a guide for improvement. Capitalization -Production of final report

-Handing in of report.

 

 

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3.6. Findings & Analysis (based on external evaluation objectives):

WEEP direct beneficiaries constitute rural and semi urban women whose ages range from 21 to 65. Most are farmers, petty traders or home makers who are holders of the Teacher Grades 1 & 2 Certificates (05%), the GCE Advance & Ordinary levels (10%), the First School Leaving Certificate (35%) or have never seen the four walls of a school (50%). Their average monthly income is less than thirty thousand francs (30.000 FRS). About 65% of women reached are cohabitating with a man in polygamous homes, 10% are single, 20% are widows and 5% are legally married. About 90% of WEEP beneficiaries hold leadership positions especially in religious (CWF) and tribal groups within their communities. The Birth rate is very high with families averaging between 5 to 8 children, who are mostly used as farm hands by their parents. Discussions on sexuality with spouses (if they can locate them) are still taboo to about 65% of beneficiaries. Two primary methods of family planning are being used by the women (condoms and ejaculation outside the virgina).

60% of Community Facilitators do not own Marriage Certificates. Most of the Chiefs reached share sympathy on the plight of their female subjects and agree to be resource persons to coach their peers but privately acknowledge that gender relations on reproductive and inheritance rights, polygamy and marriage certificates cannot be handled at the village level only. 55% of the men (both old and young) still nurture and harbor strong negative views on women reproductive and inheritance rights, polygamy and marriage certificates.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


3.6.1 Assess the project realization and the impact it has on the project area:

Quantitatively, all twelve (12) planned activities within seventeen (17) communities were executed thus representing 100% realization rate. Qualitatively, project activities were geared at resulting in behavioral and attitudinal changes with visible implications in men, women and youths.

 

No. Findings (Activities executed) Impact Analysis
1 Conduct 9 sensitization meetings on the political participation of the woman (3 per municipality).
  • About 12,000 persons were directly or indirectly reached with information relating to WEEP activities. Considering the social communication strategies amongst women, through many informal gatherings like hair making saloons, markets, njangis, tribal meetings, antinatal visits and Church announcements.
  • 85% of persons reached were women,
  • 80% of female councilors are actively preparing the women to register, vote and to make informed choices during the upcoming vote.

 

 

2 Organize Workshops on Strengthening women’s strategies for political leadership in municipal and legislative elections / Coach on Strategies for Female Mobilization in the upcoming elections.
  • 178 women leaders trained.
  • Local councils have earmarked funds in their 2013 budgets for gender related issues.
  • AFFCO (Association for Female Political Leaders) reinforced in Meme Division thus increasing women networking and monitoring of council activities.
  • AFFCO in collaboration with ELECAM are engaging programs on gender issues to educate women on their civic responsibilities.
  • 65% of women interviewed indicated their willingness to run for the upcoming council and parliamentary elections.
  • 85% of women contacted will vote for female candidates during the upcoming council elections.
  • All five female Councilors and Deputy Mayors interviewed indicated that they will present their candidatures for the upcoming local elections.
3 Conduct Sensitization meetings on economic potentials of the woman.
  • 300 women trained on Soap making and Cake icing in six (06) communities in 2011.
  • 765 women in seven (17) communities sensitized in 2011 on the economic potentials of the woman.
  • All women and men interviewed support an economic agenda (train & support with seed capital) for WEEP beneficiaries
4 Conduct Grassroots training workshops on Gender and Women’s Rights v  1.754 women trained on Gender & Women’s Rights in seventeen (17) communities in 2011 & 2012
5 Conduct sensitization meetings on the Education of the girl child and the legalization of marriages.
  • 1.500 women sensitized on the need for girls to attend school and legalize marriage in seventeen communities in 2011 & 2012.
  • All female respondents acknowledge they feel freer to discuss sexuality with their partners.
  • All female respondents insist they will support their girl child to attend school.
  • All women interviewed indicate they no longer insist that their daughters follow them to the farm during school periods
  • All female respondents affirm the woman’s right to have a marriage certificate and are willing to offer advice and encouragement for the acquisition of same.
  • All female respondents affirm the woman’s right to inherit land.
  • All female respondents affirm women’s right to own land and are willing to protect this position.
  • 95% of women insist they will encourage their daughters to own marriage certificates.
6 Conduct Mass marriages. ü  Fifteen Couples legally married including one Mayor.

ü  Pastor of Mambanda Parish suspended 2 young Christians who deliberately refused to legalize their weddings. This is an enforcement strategy to that will be emulated by other pastors.

ü  Demand for this service has sky rocketed in all neighboring communities.

7 Workshop on men and women together for the fight against Gender Based Violence (GBV).
  • 23 participants (17) women trained on GBV in three council areas in 2012.
  • More follow up coaching are planned to take place during regularly scheduled neighborhood meetings.
8 Conduct Workshop for Traditional Rulers on Promoting women’s access and control over natural resources. v  62 Traditional Authorities from two municipalities trained on Women access & control of natural resources in 2012.

v  9 Traditional Authorities have opted to serve as resource persons to influence the thinking of their peers.

9 Produce & disseminate News letter
  • 2000 newsletters distributed in seventeen communities between 2011 & 2012
10 Held Participatory Review Meetings.

 

ü  Review meetings involving 590 stakeholders held in nine communities in 2011 & 2012.

ü  The culture of review meetings has been accepted by community facilitators who will regularly conduct one

 

 

3.6.2 Assess the effectiveness and efficiency of the project management.

The evaluation reviewed the WEEP structure, personnel, equipment and financial resources that were put in place for the realization of planned activities. The analyses below are representative of the information collected.

 

3.6.2.1 WEEP Organizational Structure:

 

Management Board

Coordinator

Field Staff 01

Field Staff 02

Cashier

Community Facilitators

Other Local Partners

Target Beneficiaries

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


There are 6 Management Board members (4) female and 4 staff (all females) who were involved respectively in policy matters and project execution. The Board quarterly reviewed the progress of project implementation.

A Project Coordinator managed the day-to-day activities. She was assisted by 2 field staff and a secretary – cashier who were recruited through a competitive interview process..

The PCC (through WEEP management) was responsible for financial management through the signing of the bank booklet after request by the Coordinator for budgeted and approved action plans. This constituted the main feature within the internal control system on finances. An external audit of project accounts was also planned at the end of this project phase.

 

 

 

 

 

3.6.2.2 Staff:

No

Name Position Held Contact
1 Rev. Mary Wose Coordinator 79 42 14 71
2 Mrs. Mojoko Pauline Ndeh Cashier 75 75 39 23
3 Joseline Liengu Field Staff 01 74 63 11 59
4 Susan Ameh Field Staff 02 77 97 09 62

 

3.6.2.3 Weep Equipment:

WEEP has an office space (which is shared between the Coordinator and the field staff) equipped with furniture (2 tables and 3 chairs), 1 Computer and printer (currently non functional), training materials, office supplies, internet access

3.6.2.4  Analysis on the Effectiveness of Project Management:

 

–          The WEEP Board meets 3 times annually. Some members showed limited mastery of project activities as well as knowledge on fundraising. Consequently, Resource Mobilization is abandoned to the Board Chairperson and the Coordinator.

–          In sharing one office space, the Coordinator was handicap when discussing policy matters which sometimes were prematurely discussed with others by the staff.

–          The staff is dedicated and with diverse professional backgrounds which can contribute positively toward effective project execution.

–          The staff clearly understood and shared in the spirit of the project goals and objectives though apparently possessing low capacities to take initiatives.

–          There was joint (participatory) budgeting of field operations.

–          WEEP management put in place an internal control system which involved request and authorization to make justified expenditures, disbursement of funds, acquisition of assets and documentation in a register,

–          The selected communities for the project were appropriate because they are representative of male domination and have high incidences of low school attendance records for children especially the girl child. In these communities, Traditional Authorities and men consider women as “baby making machines and farm hands”.

 

3.6.2.5  Analysis on the Efficiency of Project Management:

 

v  Budget analysis indicate that about 85% was spent on core activities including transportation while about 15% was spent on administration including salaries, board expenses during meetings, overheads and materials. This budgetary spread enabled the very high rate of project execution.

v  Most (90%) activities were executed by project field staff thus reducing the high costs associated with the use of external facilitators.

v  Project activities benefited mostly rural women who are usually eager to put knowledge gained into practice especially on social and economic issues.

v  The project was primarily geared towards empowering the inner self which is usually slow to manifest and difficult to evaluate in the short and medium term.

v  The operational budget for the project phase under review stood at 32.750.000 FCFA. About 12.000 persons were reached either directly or indirectly during the course of the project execution. This translates into 2.730 FCFA spent to reach, sensitize or train a beneficiary.

v  From local realities when compared to figures of 5.000 FCFA per beneficiary, one can conveniently state that the WEEP utilized fewer resources to make the required initial impact. Usually, several years are needed to make a lasting impact

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


3.6.3 Assess the sustainability of the project outcomes after the end of the project phase:

6 project outcomes were identified and  below is an analysis on how each can enhance the sustainability of the project.

 

No Project Outcome Aspects of Sustainability
1 10% increase in the number of motivated and proactive women leaders in target communities.
  • Motivated and proactive women have organized several sensitization meetings and radio talk shows. An Association of female political leaders has been reinforced. Empowerment of women’s groups and advocates of gender equality and good governance with skills, which they are continuously using, is keeping project gains and memories alive.
  • Pertinent issues that were raised during project implementation are common place in several discussions on gender and women rights.
  • AFFCO in collaboration with MINPROFF and UNIFEM are contributing towards the national debate on Instituting a Gender Policy in Cameroon.
2 Pool of  17 trained community facilitators

 

.

 

  • A Pool of trained resource persons including 17 community facilitators, 9 Traditional Authorities, 5 Clergy and 170 representatives of women groups have been identified within the 17 communities who will continuously reinforce aspects of the project (a case relates to the Pastor of Mambanda congregation, who suspended two male Christians in order to enforce their acquisition of marriage certificates).
  •  Further training and coaching at grassroots levels are being conducted whenever there are public manifestations and gatherings of the rural as well as urban women.
  • The Clergy in the project area are using sermons in Churches and bible lessons to continuously reinforce aspects of the project.
  • Workshop reports on gender and women’s rights are serving as a working document for grassroots training after the project.
  • The 2000 Newsletters (Smiling Women) centered on gender issues are available printed material in the households of beneficiaries which are serving regular reference, review and reminder purposes.

 

3 Creation & Reinforced functioning of the Association of Female Politicians (AFFCO). that is determined to protect and institute knowledge acquired.
  • These female councilors regularly mobilize female grass root militants for political participation (obtain National Identity Cards, Register to Vote, Choice of Candidates, Women Friendly Voting Strategies).
4 The current 2013 budgets of Konye, Kumba 1 and Mbonge councils have allocations for Gender Issues.
  • Gender Responsive Budgeting in local councils is also being used by some women activists to lobby councils reduce bottlenecks on the issuance of marriage certificates.
  • Increased Potentials for collaboration between local councils and WEEP
5 Increased awareness on the reproductive rights of women.

 

  • About 75% of women interviewed regularly use contraceptives (natural or otherwise), while about 9 out of every ten girl or single woman interviewed attest to buying condoms for safe keeping “should in case.”
  • 90% of women who are less 50years of age regularly check their HIV/AIDS status to be sure of themselves and to take corrective actions if necessary.
  • All women indicated that they regularly discuss sexuality with their spouses and freely discuss same during meetings on these topics.
6
Monitoring and Evaluation Plan

 

  • Monitoring and follow up of project trainings are discussed during regularly scheduled by the community facilitators.
  • An external evaluation at the end of the project has just been concluded in which pertinent recommendations have been proposed to the benefit both the project management and the target populations.  

 


3.6.4 Enable the project build on the results/recommendations of the evaluation and to consolidate the work that has been done in the previous project areas of Fako and Meme divisions:

(Most of the recommendations of the last evaluation have actually been respected. However, new challenges (based on the demands of the target beneficiaries) have surfaced as current realities require adjusting the focus of future WEEP activities.

In order to build on project gains and to ensure that knowledge acquired can be effectively implemented by beneficiaries, the following suggestions should be highly considered:

 

 

  • Organize training for the WEEP Board members and staff on Resource Mobilization, project Planning Monitoring & Evaluation and Organizational Development. Solicit Funding for this training from the EU / PASC Program which is ongoing.
  • The WEEP should maintain a Webpage on the PCC Website as a strategy for Visibility and Fundraising.
  • Produce a Manual on all WEEP Interventions (capitalization) and Disseminate hundreds of copies to all past and present Community Facilitators, Traditional Authorities, the Clergy and representatives of women groups in all target communities. This will reinforce proximity coaching, follow up and sustainability of project gains.
  • Develop initial proposals for collaboration with MINPROFF and local councils (Konye, Kumba 1 & Mbonge) on Mass Marriages. Engage the United Councils and Cities of Cameroon (UCCC South West) to reflect on the institutionalization of Marriage Certificates in all councils within the region.
  • Reinforce training of Traditional Authorities at Sub Divisional Chief Conference Levels or Divisional Chiefs Conference Levels (Fako & Meme) where cultural issues such as land ownership and reproductive rights can be effectively discussed and decisions implemented. (Decisions on socio cultural issues at the village level can not be binding on the tribe or the clan).
  • Organize Round Table Conferences that bring together all stakeholders (at community level) to discuss “Face to Face” on burning Socio Cultural Issues (land ownership, reproductive rights, marriage certificates, education of children, local elections & the vote).
  • Segment target beneficiaries (based on age groups and expressed needs) for specific knowledge transfer. The active population need more knowledge on reproductive rights (including emphasis on the use of female condoms) and legalized marriages while widows and women above 45 need more economic empowerment. All groups need to vote and to have their economic initiatives supported.
  • Intensify partnerships for Alternative Funding that benefits Income Generating Activities (self reliance / economic empowerment of WEEP beneficiaries. This should include the possibilities of provision of seed capital (average request is between 25.000 FCFA and 50.000FCFA). At the national level, WEEP should request for collaboration with organizations such as Heifer Project International Cameroon based in Nkwen, Bamenda that support livestock activities. Contacts should be developed with other national programs such as the Program to Support Actors in the Informal Sector (PIAISI), the National Employment Fund (NEF) and other programs in the Agriculture sub sector.
  • At the International level there are feminist and gender active organizations such as the African Women Development Foundation (AWDF), Virginia Giles Foundation (VGIF), the Turing Foundation, the Cordaid Foundation, the Women Inter Church Foundation, MIVA Austria & Poland that should be highly solicited for assistance which could tremendously improve the living conditions of WEEP target beneficiaries. Carefully crafted cover letters may be required from the PCC, BftW, and Mission 21 for these partnerships to be concretized.
  • The WEEP should prepare an Action Plan 2013 to 2015 that is guided by the MDGs as well as Cameroon’s Vision 2035. This will better integrate the target beneficiaries into the country’s development efforts.
  • A Project Mid Term Assessment should be envisioned at the end of 2016 which should give an insight on concrete realizations of the WEEP.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.0 Challenges

To change mentalities, habits and attitudes on social and cultural aspects of life in rural settings requires patience and immense resolve. The target groups for WEEP activities constitute individuals who over the years have experienced untold sufferings and hardships due to generally acceptable societal norms in typically male dominated communities. Consequently, project challenges can be expected to be diverse and cumbersome. These include:

 

  1. Traditional Authorities and men within these communities still consider women as farm hands and baby making machines. These individuals harbor strong feelings on women rights. Overcoming these negative feelings will certainly take a long time and maximum patience is required.
  2. The women themselves present a challenge in some cases where they have resigned themselves to their fate and even resort to competition for the husbands, jealousy, and animosity due in large part to ignorance. The project will need extra coaching on group dynamics.
  3. The project area is located in settings where the roads are impassable during the rainy season, thus increasing costs associated with project execution. The bad roads also reduce the movement of persons as well as goods thus decreasing the degree of participation during project activities.
  4. Community facilitators and other resource persons are somewhat expectant of financial compensation for their time even though the accrued benefits are for the community at large.
  5. Insufficient monitoring by community facilitators as field trips often required finances which they are unable to generate.

5.0 Recommendations (please see 3.6.4. above)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6.0 Conclusion

The WEEP project has been executed in the South West Region of Cameroon since 2005. It has primarily made enough gains in the area of awareness creation. Several individuals in target communities are currently able to freely discuss issues related to sexuality, land ownership, reproductive rights, polygamy and the education of the girl child. Many resource persons including pastors, teachers and politicians have taken note on the need to ameliorate the socio cultural conditions of the rural woman. The changes are certainly bound to be evolutionary which is time consuming. Executing a project with such sensitive topics on the culture of people in rural settings is not commonplace. Gender gaps in access and control of natural resources are a result of years of discrimination. They will not disappear in a hurry. The involvement of the clergy is clearly a positive aspect toward project sustainability as well.

The project has catalyzed the thinking of community members toward the right direction on issues of women human, social and economic rights.

 Several outcomes have been put in place that will ensure that project gains are not lost. Networking and the involvement of gender sensitive institutions such as MINPROFF and commitment from the local councils will go a long way to protect these gains.

 

 WEEP management should pay close attention to the recommendations especially those that hinge on the felt needs of beneficiaries who are yearning for effective economic empowerment which should go beyond training and provide seed capital. WEEP should put in place an action plan for 2013 to 2015 guided by the dictates of the Millennium Development Goals. The project should envision a Project Impact Assessment by the end of 2016 that will give an insight on concrete achievements that go beyond awareness creation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7.0. Annexes

7.1. WEEP Call for External Evaluation Tender.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7.2. External Evaluation Team:

 

No Name Function Contact
1 Charlie Mbonteh Team Leader / Supervision 77 64 94 30 / 94 34 43 52

mudecgroup@yahoo.com /mudecgroup@gmail.com

www.mudecgroup.org

2 Lawong Judith Consultant / Analysis & Interpretation 75 00 77 88
3 Henry Ngole Data Collection 78 24 21 88
4 Atem Eugene Data Collection 74 50 59 95
5 Nong Theodora M. Capitalization 75 81 66 63

 

7.3. List of Persons contacted:

 

7.3.1. Board Members:

No

Name Contact
1 Rev. Besong Johnson 77 27 38 59
2 Rev. Ngwa Hosea 77 80 58 64
3 Rev. Mary Wose 79 42 14 71
4 Mrs. Ndive Fanny Namondo 77 68 20 38
5 Mrs. Mojoko Pauline Ndeh 75 75 39 23

 

7.3.2. WEEP Staff:

No

Name Position Held Contact
1 Rev. Mary Wose Coordinator 79 42 14 71
2 Mrs. Mojoko Pauline Ndeh Cashier 75 75 39 23
3 Joseline Liengu Field Staff 01 74 63 11 59
4 Susan Ameh Field Staff 02 77 97 09 62

 

7.3.3. Female Councilors / Secretary Generals of Councils:

No

Name Council Contact

1

Mrs. Alice Balemba Konye 77 78 50 95

2

Mrs. Okie Susan Mbonge 75 58 81 72

3

Mrs. Ntungwe Pamela Kumba I 79 64 36 75

 

7.3.4. Community Facilitators:

No Community Name Contact
1 Mbonge Maromba Mokambe Flora 77 04 15 30
2 Small Ekombe Tah Magaret 74 59 57 78 / 75 47 63 61
3 Kwakwa Kate Ngoe  74 88 11 76
4 Dieka Fuh Delphine 78 27 41 28
5 Barombi Kang Suka Anastasia 77 02 10 43
6 Mambanda Eyong Joan   77 21 60 26
7 Kake II Ndombo Martha 77 26 54 06
8 Konye Alice Balimba 77 78 50 95
9 Mbakwa Supe Uriah Odine 70 93 42 60
10 Dikomi Nkah Agie  75 83 98 82
11 Lobangi Rev. Ndam Elias 75 40 55 83
12 Matoh Ngoe Gladys  70 32 14 76

 

 

 

7.3.5. Traditional / Religious Authorities Contacted:

No. Village Traditional Authority Religious Authority
1 Mbonge Chief Daniel Moffa Mokambe Rev. Abangma Elias Agbor

 77 27 83 26

2 Small Ekombe Chief Ote Bebe Fabia Rev. Festus Enuge Mesumbe

 77 18 64 00

3 Dieka Chief Ndiba Oscar  
4 Barombi Kang   Rev. Angafuh Augustine Fonsoh

77 02 38 87

5 Ngolo Bolo Chief Ngoe  Awudu  
6 Dikomi Chief Sona Makia  
7 Dipenda Bakundu Chief Bekindaka Sakwe  
8 Sambaliba Chief Mukundu Martin  
9 Matoh

 

Chief John Itoe       Rev. Agbor Williams

74 79 57 11

10 Matoh Chief Mekumba  

 

7.3.6. Contact Persons in Mbonge:

No

Name Profession Contact
1 Epupu  Pauline Farmer  
2 Lucy Mekwe House Wife  
3 Nolinga Felicia House Wife  
4 Ekoko Sophie Diale Secretary  
5 Bridget Sem Farmer 75760600
6 Nolinga Mercy Farming 70434411
7 Mokake Mercy Teaching 75207552
8 Nzeba  Racheal Farming 77381838
9 Akuma Mary Teaching 77395690
10 Helen Ngah House Wife 78802988

 

7.3.7. Contact Persons in Mbakwa Supe:

No Name Profession Contact
1 Fanny Penda Farmer  
2 Mukete Alice Farmer  
3 Etinge Christian Farmer  
4 Yoni Susan Farmer  
5 Mosima Magdaline House wife  
6 Bweh Celine Hair Dresser  
7 Lokndo Olivia Farmer  
8 Butana Victorine Petit Business  
9 Frida Ngoe Farming  
10 Bokusa Jacobine Petit Business  

 

7.3.8. Contact Persons in Small Ekombe:

No Name Profession Contact
1 Tah Margaret Farmer  
2 Vagacy Dorothy Farmer  
3 edumbe Christian Farmer  
4 Philomena Ache Farmer  
5 Rose Ocie Farmer  
6 Vivian neba Farmer  
7 Lum Monica Maggi Business  
8 Susan Eben Business  
9 Martha Okafor Business  
10 Abangma Serah Housewife 77395810

 

7.3.9. Contact Persons in Kwakwa:

No Name Profession Contact
1 Tase Verona Business 77607824
2 Liwo Rose Business 79709650
3 Martha Nakomo Business  
4 Esther Tita Farmer  
5 Fulem Mary Farmer  
6 Tenject Elizabeth Farmer  
7 Pauline Njeck Business  
8 Timben Pauline Business  
9 Sarah Takoh Farmer  
10 Tah Celine Farmer  

 

 

7.3.10. Contact Persons in Dieka:

No Name Profession Contact
1 Fuh  Delphine Farmer 71467068
2 Anna Ebako Farmer  
3 Mary Esembe Farmer 78408836
4 Eko Easter Farmer 76820567
5 Nji Roseline Hair Dresser  
6 Dibande Malga Farmer 72068866
7 Rose Abwa Petit Business  
8 Epong Mukete Farming 71515466
9 Elizabeth Ngoh Petit Business  
10 Etoa Katerine Farming 71471470

 

7.3.11. Contact Persons in Barombi Kang:

No Name Profession Contact
1 Awa Dorothy Farmer  
2 Che Beatrice Farmer  
3 Ajuh Grace Farmer  
4 Adangwa Martha Farmer  
5 Elonge Elizabeth Hair Dresser  
6 Ekwoge Marcy Farmer  
7 Numfor Ostencia Petit Business  
8 Endum Celine Farming  
9 Ebanek Martha Petit Business  
10 Ebong Judith House wife  

 

7.3.12. Contact Persons in Mambanda:

No Name Profession Contact
1 1 Che Eveline House wife  
2 Jessy Sona Farmer  
3 Yemi Florence Farmer  
4 Sona Beltha Farmer  
5 Njana Pauline Farmer  
6 Ajabai Rose House wife  
7 Ange Regina Farmer  
8 Ruth Abegitue Farmer  
9 Suh Rachaeal Farmer  
10 Tinah Comfort Farmer  

 

 

 

7.3.13. Contact Persons in Kake II:

No Name Profession Contact
1 Theodora Bichani Farmer  
2 Mangong Margret Farmer  
3 Gladies Tah Farmer  
4 Victorine Ndaga Farmer  
5 Jeosophine Betapo House wife  
6 Regina Ogie Farmer  
7 Anastasia Mosowell Farmer  
8 Susan Acho Farmer  
9 Balimba Magdaline Farmer  
10 Stella Manjo House wife  

 

 

 

7.3.14. Contact Persons in Dikomi:

No Name Profession Contact
1 Kang Julie Ekume Farmer  
2 Ekah Agnes Farmer 75 83 98 82
3 Edum Jacqueline Farmer 75 31 60 03
4 Ewang Hannah Farmer  
5 Echawah Ernestine Farmer  
6 Ewane Magdalene House wife  
7 Ejuje Alice Farmer  
8 Mary Opoh Farmer  
9 Akwaya Hannah Farmer  
10 Nzogge Grace Dione Farmer  

 

 

7.3.15. Contact Persons in Lobangi:

No Name Profession Contact
1 Etumbe Regina Ndie Farmer  
2 Ewange Alice Farmer  
3 Penda Fanny Farmer  
4 Lobe Helen Farmer  
5 Njimbong Gladys House wife  
6 Mofa Pauline Hair Dresser  
7 Akama-Makia Baliki Farmer  
8 Meboka Emilia Petit Business  
9 Balemba Grace Farming  
10 Nnoko Angeline Petit Business  

 

 

7.3.16. Contact Persons in Matoh:

No Name Profession Contact
1 Etongwe Florence Hair Dresser  
2 Itoe Frida Farmer  
3 Mboe Jennet Petit Business  
4 Sakwe Beatrice Farming  
5 Ngoe Mirabel Petit Business  
6 Itoe Pauline Farmer  
7 Makane Frida Farmer  
8 Joan Embe Farmer  
9 Moleka Juliana Farmer  
10 Monie Jacobine House wife  

 

 

 

 

 

 7.3.17. Contact Persons in Konye:

No Name Profession Contact
1 Modika Monica Farmer  
2 Mercy Kien Lyonga Farmer  
3 Bebololaka Violet Farmer  
4 Kindem Rose Farmer  
5 Otto Gladys Hair Dresser  
6 Itoe Lucy Farmer  
7 Mukete Raheal Petit Business  
8 Mercy Eke Farming  
9 Motase Sidoline Petit Business  
10 Mella Edith House wife  

 

 

7.3.18. Male Beneficiaries Contacted:

No Names Village No Names Village
1 Laban Diongo      Dieka 15 Musi Philip     Small Ekombe
2 Mokube Linus        Dieka 16 Tah Manfred      Small Ekombe
3 Elangwe Jacob       Dieka 17 Bah Theophilus      Mambanda
4 Diang Jonathan Young     Small Ekombe 18 Undatou Samson   Mambanda
5 Ojeh Kingsley   Small Ekombe 19 Mokube Samuel      Mambanda
6 Nzume Lord White   Dikomi 20 Ameyumbi James     Mambanda
7 Abango Peter       Dikomi 21 Itoe John Kosa Mambanda
8 Achuonoh Jonathan       Dikomi 22 Bingeh James Mambanda
9 Epie Spivac Uko     Dikomi 23 Mbah Henry Tembi       Matoh
10 London Edward       Matoh 24 Agie David      Matoh
11 Misodi James       Matoh 25 Masango Joel          Matoh
12 Peter Motale     Matoh 26 Motale Ezekiel       Matoh
13 Elias Moffa          Matoh 27 Iyambe  Walters       Matoh
14 Takwa Daniel     Matoh      

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7.4. Photo Gallery:

Discussions in Small Ekombe

Discussions were revealing

Interview with Board Member

Coordinator’s Views

Interviews in Barombi Kang

Focus Group in Barombi Kang

Focus Group in Mbakwa Supe

Focus Group with Staff & Board

Discussion with Board Secretary

Focus Group in Dikomi

Focus Group in Matoh

Focus Group in Mbonge

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Restitution/Validation & Press Conference

Restitution/Validation & Family Photo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7.5. Samples of Data Collection Tools:

 

Questionnaire for WEEP Beneficiaries

 

This questionnaire is aimed at evaluating the activities of the WEEP Project that were carried out in the Meme Division between 2011 and 2012. We will therefore be very grateful if you answer these questions as sincerely as possible. The information that you provide will remain confidential. Thank You!

 

A. Personal Information

 

  1. Occupation:________________________________________________________
  2. What is your level of education:_______________________________________
  3. Sex:                 Female           Male
  4. Age group:  15-25 ,      26-35    ,    36-45   ,    46-55        , 56+     .
  5. Community:___________________________ Council _________________
  6. Marital Status: Single  ,   Married   ,    Divorced    ,   Widow      , Widower      .
  7. If you are married, do you have a marriage certificate?      Yes       No      
  8. When did you obtain your marriage certificate? _____________________

 

B. Women Leadership/ Gender awareness for women trained

  1. Do you belong to any group? Political, Cultural, Religious, Others___________________
  2. Do you hold any leadership position? Yes        No   
  3. What group(s): _____________________
  4. What position is it? __________________________
  5. What major problems do you face in carrying out your functions as a leader? ___
  6. Do your male colleagues support you?         Yes     No      
  7. If no, give reasons why?
  8. When were you elected into office? _________________
  9. What made you to go in for this position? _____________
  10. Do you intend to go in for the next elections? ______ Why? ___________

For Leaders

  1. Do you consider women’s welfare in your decision making?    Yes      No
  2. If yes, which decisions have you changed or implemented to favor women’s welfare? __________________________________________________________
  3. If no, Why? _______________________________________________________
  4. Do you involve women in decision making in your institution? _______
  5. If no, Why? _______________________________________________________
  6. Are there some positions you reserved only for men? _____________________
  7. If yes, which positions? ______________________________________________

C. Reproductive Rights

  1. Who is the head of your household/family? ______________________________
  2. How do you assist your spouse in running your home? _____________________
  3. Do you discuss sexuality with your spouse? ______________________________
  4. If no, why? ________________________________________________________
  5. If yes, why? _______________________________________________________
  6. How many children do you have? ______________________________________
  7. How many girls? _______________     How many boys? ___________________
  8. Do they all go to school? Yes        No     
  9. If no state why? _________________________________­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­______________
  10. What other training do you give your girl child who is not in school? __________
  11. Are you aware of any birth control method? Yes       ,   No
  12. If yes, state the specific one you know __________________________________
  13. How did you know about it? __________________________________________
  14. Do you practice it? Yes           No
  15. If no, say why______________________________________________________
  16. If yes, say why _____________________________________________________
  17. Have you ever done HIV/AIDS voluntary screening?  Yes         No
  18. If yes how many times? ______________________________________________
  19. When was the last time you did it? _____________________________________
  20. If yes, why is it important to do it? _____________________________________
  21. If no, say why _____________________________________________________

D. Legal and Inheritance Rights

How has the WEEP workshop helped you to:

  1. Buy and own landed property _________________________________________
  2. Inherit property (Landed property) _____________________________________
  3. Obtain  Marriage Certificate ________________________________________
  4. Obtain Birth Certificate__________________________________________
  5. Do you own land? __________________________________________________
  6. How did you obtain it?  A) Bought,  B)  Inherit, C) Gift, D) Others ________
  7. When did you acquire it? _________________________

E. Women Education

  1. How has the WEEP workshop improved

a)      Your level of awareness? _______________________________________

b)      The education of your girl child? _________________________________

c)      The empowerment of your female house help? ______________________

Questionnaire for WEEP Community Facilitators

A. Personal Information

  1. Occupation:________________________________________________________
  2. What is your level of education:________________________________________
  3. Sex:                 Female           Male
  4. Age group:   15-25,    26-35    , 36-45      , 46-55     , 56+     .
  5. Community:_________________________ Council __________
  6. Marital Status: Single,  Married    ,  Divorced     , Widow      , Widower      .
  7. Do you have a marriage certificate? __________ when did you acquire it? ________
  8. How has the knowledge acquired from WEEP benefited your marriage? __

 

B. Training on Facilitation

  1. What facilitating /communication/mobilization skills have you acquired from the training? ____
  2. How have you been using these skills? ____
  3. How were you functioning as a community facilitator during the project? ……
  4. What problems/challenges do you face in performing your functions? _____
  5. What documents/guide are you using as a facilitator in your community? ______
  6. How have you been using it? ____________________
  7. What problems do you have using it? _________________
  8. How have you been relating with other women network? ____________
  9. How have the knowledge acquired from WEEP project benefited your community? _________
  10. Which M&E tools do you master? ________________
  11. How do you use them? ____________________
  12. How do you use your skills as a community facilitator? (For the Clergy only) ___

 

Women Leadership/ Gender awareness

  1. Do you belong to any group? Political, Cultural, Religious, Others___________________
  2. Do you hold any leadership position? Yes          No  
  3. What group(s): _____
  4. What position is it? _____________
  5. What major problems do you face in carrying out your functions as a leader? ____
  6. Do your male colleagues support you? Yes        No      
  7. If No, give reasons why?
  8. When were you elected into office? _____
  9. What made you to go in for this position? ____________
  10. Do you intend to go in for the next elections? ______ Why? _______

 

C. Reproductive Rights

  1. Who is the head of your household/family? ________
  2. How do you assist your spouse in running your home? ________
  3. Do you discuss sexuality with your spouse? ____________________
  4. If no, why? _______________________
  5. If yes, why? ________________________
  6. How many children do you have? ___________________________
  7. How many girls? _______________              How many boys? _________
  8. Do they all go to school? Yes         No     
  9. If no state why? _________________________________­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­______
  10. What other training do you give your girl child who is not in school? ____
  11. Are you aware of any birth control method?      Yes          No
  12. If yes, state the specific one you know __________
  13. How did you know about it? ______________________
  14. Do you practice it?          Yes           No
  15. If no, say why________________
  16. If yes, say why ____________________________________
  17. Have you ever done HIV/AIDS voluntary screening Yes          No
  18. If yes, how many times? ____________________________
  19. When was the last time you did it? ____________
  20. If yes, why is it important to do it? _________________
  21. If no, say why _________________

D. Legal and Inheritance Rights

How has the WEEP workshop helped you to:

  1. Buy and own landed property ________________________
  2. Inherit property (Landed property) ___________________
  3. Obtain Marriage Certificate ______________
  4. Obtain Birth Certificate _________________
  5. Do you own land? ________________________
  6. How did you obtain it?  A) Bought,  B)  Inherit,  C) Gift, D) Others __
  7. When did you acquire it? _________________________

 

Questionnaire for Female Councilors

 

A. Personal Information

  1. What is your constituency? ____________
  2. What position do you hold in your council? ____
  3. How were you voted? __________________________
  4. Age group:     15-25,      26-35,        36-45,         46-55,        56+     .
  5. Marital Status:    Single,      Married,     Divorced      Widow      Widower     
  6. Are you legally married? _______________
  7. How has the knowledge acquired from WEEP benefited your marriage?_

B. Leadership

  1. What functions do your perform in the council? _____
  2. What major problems do you face in carrying out your functions as a leader?
  3. How are you using knowledge gained to influence male dominateed decisions?…………………………………………………………….
  4. What made you to go in for this position_________________________
  5. Do you consider women’s welfare in your decision making? Yes       No
  6. If yes, which decisions have you changed or implemented to favor women’s welfare? ______
  7. If no, why? ____________
  8. Do you involve women in decision making in your institution? _
  9. If no, why? ________
  10. Are there some positions you reserved only for men? __________
  11. If yes, Which positions? ______________________________________
  12. How has the knowledge acquired from WEEP benefited your council? ___
  13. Is there an ‘association of Meme Female Councilors’? ____________
  14. If no why? __________________________________________________
  15. If yes, what are its’ functions? __________________________________
  16. Do you intend to go in for the next elections? _______________________

C. Reproductive/Legal Rights

  1. Who is the head of your household/family? ________________________
  2. How do you assist your spouse in running your home? _______________
  3. Do you discuss sexuality with your spouse? ________________________
  4. If no why? __________________________________________________
  5. If yes why? _________________________________________________
  6. How many children do you have? ________________________________
  7. How many girls? _______________              How many boys? _________
  8. Do they all go to school? Yes      No     
  9. If no state why? _________________________________­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­____________
  10. What other training do you give your girl child who is not in school? ___
  11. Have you ever done HIV/AIDS voluntary screening?  Yes         No
  12. If yes how many times? ________________________________________
  13. When was the last time you did it? _______________________________
  14. Why is it important to do it? ____________________________________
  15. If no, say why _______________________________________________
  16. Do you own land? ____________________________________________
  17. If yes, how did you obtain it?  A) Bought,  B)  Inherit  C) Gift, D) Others _

153How has the knowledge acquired from WEEP benefited your personal life?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Questionnaire for Traditional Authorities & Male Beneficiaries:

 

  1. Occupation:________________________________________________________
  2. What is your level of education:________________________________________      
  3. Age group:  15-25     26-35    , 36-45       46-55     , 56+     .
  4. Village:________________________
  5. Marital Status: Single,     Married,          Divorce        Widower    
  6. How many wives do you have? …………….. .
  7. Which birth control methods do you know?…. Do you practice it?…… How?…
  8. Do you discuss family planning with her / them? How often?……….
  9. Do you have a marriage certificate? _____When did you acquire it? ________
  10. How has the knowledge acquired from WEEP benefited your marriage? __
  11. How and When did you become Traditional Ruler? ………………………
  12. Are there female traditional councilors in your village?…….. why? …. How many?…………….  What efforts have you made to include women? ……
  13. Do you discuss gender issues during traditional council meetings? Which do you discuss? …………….
  14. Do you handle gender related cases in your council?… Which?… How?….
  15. Do you have a daughter?……… Does she go to school? …. Why?………………..
  16. Can women in your community own land and other natural resources?…..
  17. Can women in your village inherit land? ………………………
  18. Would be willing to hand over land to your married or unmarried daughter? Why?………….
  19. Would you encourage your daughter to get into a polygamous marriage?….. Why?
  20. What roles do women and the youths play in various development efforts in your community?
  21. What are some of the obstacles that prevent youths and women participation in local activities?
  22. Are you aware of cultural practices that hinder the growth of women and youths?
  23. What efforts are you making to reduce negative cultural practices against women?
  24. Do you discuss the plight of women with other chiefs of other villages?… How, When & Where? ………………………………………………….

 

Track II Project to Institutionalize Gender Responsive Budgeting in Councils of the South West Region of Cameroon.

 

 

 

Submitted to:  UN Women.

Submitted by: MUDEC Group.

Submitted on: 30th October, 2012

 

 

 

Proposal Template

Civil Society Grant Application

“Increasing Accountability in Financing for Gender Equality”

Send proposals to: gender.budgets@unwomen.org by 31 October 2012

Contact Information

 

  1. a.  Organization contact

 

Organization name* Municipal Development Counselling Group
Organization

Acronym

MUDEC Group
Address Molyko, Buea
City, State or

Province

South West Region

Postal

Code

NA
Country Cameroon

Website

www.mudecgroup.org
Telephone number (237) 75 13 29 70 / 77 64 94 30 / 94 34 43 52

Fax number

NA
*Name of the applicant organization. In case there is more than one organization applying, only include the name of the organization that will be responsible for project management and contractual obligations. There will be an opportunity to list names of co-applicants alter.

 

b. Head of Organization/Primary contact                                       c. Secondary contact person

person

Title         Mrs.      Title                    Mrs.                  
First Name Nancy First Name Florence
Last Name Ngalame Last Name Ewange
Telephone

number

(237) 75 13 29 70 Telephone

Number

(237) 79 70 61 37
Fax number NA Fax number NA
E-mail mudecgroupbuea@gmail.com E-mail mudecgroupbuea@gmail.com
                 

 

 

 

Skype (if applicable)

NA

Skype (if applicable)

NA

Address

 

Same as above

 

Address Same as above

 

2.  Organization Information

 

a. Type of organization (select one)
      Women led NGO  (selected)
b. Level at which the organization operates (select all that apply)
Community-based/grassroots        

 Sub-national (i.e. province, Region                                                                         

Local                                                                                                    

c. Year the organization was established. 14th February 2002
 
d. Mission Statement of Organization Reducing Poverty in our Municipalities through encouraging Gender Equality and increasing Citizen (End User) Participation in Democratic and Governance Processes.
e. Annual Organization Budget 2008

US $ 60.000

2009

US $ 75.000

2010

US $ 120.000

f. Primary Sources of Funding Service Provision through consultancy to national as well as international partners
g. Does the organization have a bank

account?

Yes      
                 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. 1.      Context / Problem Analysis: The population of Cameroon in 2010 is estimated at about 18.2 million inhabitants with an annual average growth rate of 2.3%. Women and girls represent close to 52% of the population which is relatively young, with 44% aged under 15 (TBS2, 2010) and more than 55.7% aged under 25 (EDS-III, 2010). Older people (65 years and above), who constitute more than 60% of the ruling class represent only 3% of the population (EESI, 2010). In spite of the achievements and efforts recorded in the last few years, the indicator levels for human and monetary poverty remain worrying and show huge disparities between the sexes. The rate of unemployment according to the ILO stood at 34.4% as registered in 2010 (34.2% unemployment for men and 54.6% for women). Underemployment (estimated at more than 75%, with 87% in the informal agricultural sector and 65% in the non–agricultural urban sector) remains a scourge. Underemployment rate is 68.3% for men and 83.6% for women in active service. On average, women earn half of what men earn in the informal sector. Disparities still exist and are maintained between men and women in areas such as health, education, access to certain resources and political participation. The low level of education of women and the negative influence of some socio–cultural factors limit their participation in national economic and political life. The economic evolution of the country has increased disparities between social and family groups by reinforcing the degree of precariousness of certain vulnerable social groups. Cameroon is a signatory to several international conventions including the Convention for the Elimination of all forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), the Maputo Protocol and the Millennium Development Goals (especially to promote gender equality and empower women) which were localized in 2003 through the elaboration of the Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP) and the 22nd of July 2004 Law on Decentralization which mandates local councils to alleviate poverty through the provision of basic services in the domains of education, healthcare, local economic development, culture, sports and leisure. Gender considerations are not highlighted in both the PRSP and the 2004 Law on Decentralization. The Cameroon Vision 2035 is to make Cameroon an emerging country unified in its diversity with the objective of attaining an economic growth of at least 10% per annum. To achieve its vision, the government has engaged in so many reforms including more stringent management of public finances, decentralization at regional and local levels, results based management, public service and governance reforms and the fight against corruption. This vision cannot be attained without the effective mainstreaming of gender. It is within this framework that the government requested and obtained technical assistance to mainstream gender in the revised PRSP.  The Ministry of Territorial Administration and Decentralization (MINATD) requested and received an increase in its budget to enable the transfer of funds to local councils. This means that councils will be able to experiment with a range of participatory strategies on the delivery of basic services to their population.

Considering government’s determination to advance with the decentralization process in 2010, the law that transfers certain government obligations, competences and resources to councils did not take into consideration gender equality within the decentralization process. The main obstacle government has is the insufficient knowledge and capacities to implement Gender Responsive Budgeting (GRB) at the local level, which this advocacy campaign wishes to implement. The difficulties of taking gender into account at the level of the budget are especially linked to the management of cross-cutting issues. Gender is not integrated into fiscal and monetary policies. The respective contributions from women and men are not understood as such in the planning and budgetary processes. The fiscal and economic contributions of women are not all considered into national income accounts. The indicators used are macroeconomic and quantitative and do not integrate the qualitative aspects, which would more likely bring out the inequalities and the actual contributions of women and men to the economy of the country.

Track I Project to Advocate to Institutionalize GRB in Local Councils in the South West Region was executed in 2010 and 2011 within the framework of the Coalition for More Open Democratic Societies in the South West Region. Coalition members for this project included MUDEC Group which has expertise in participatory processes in local governance, YADD which has experience in mobilization and organization of youth and women groups. The project was sponsored by the European Union (PASOC) and implemented in 6 pilot councils in partnership with women focal groups. The main objective was to stimulate the debate on GRB with an expected result of causing municipal councilors to deliberate and adopt Municipal Orders bearing on engendering the budgets of councils.  Track I project witnessed activities geared at sensitization as well as advocacy campaigns which targeted local decision makers including Supervisory Authorities of councils, locally elected officials (Mayors and Councilors) and senior council staff (Secretaries General and Municipal Treasurers) who are responsible for drafting and implementing the council budget.

Track II Project on GRB represents an opportunity for an action plan to be supported that will among others evaluate the functioning of gender equality accountability mechanisms that were put in place during the execution of the Track I project. Track II project seeks to address economic discriminations that women and youth encounter by introducing, sensitizing and advocating for output based budgeting within the nomenclature of council finances. It is centered on promoting GRB (results based) for gender equitable local development (MDG no. 3).

This project will enable local councils to have the technical capacity to integrate gender aggregated information into planning, budgeting and monitoring instruments. This will ensure that outputs and results are easily determined and measured. Council plans and policies will take into account the voices and situations of the majority of our population (women and youth) and adequately allocate funds to satisfy them thereby effectively reducing poverty. This Track II Project objectives share the ideals of the UN Women.

 

 

 

 

  1. 2.      Project Design / Justification:

This project is designed as a follow up of a previous project which resulted in Municipal Decisions on GRB in councils. It is designed to push the gender agenda into higher heights by advocating for results or output based budgets.

Project Objective (impact):

  • To improve the technical capacities of local councils to integrate output or results indicators into planning and budgeting.
  • To strengthen the capacities of women groups to monitor and enforce Output Based Budgets (OBB) in councils.
  • To develop a data base on the amount of council funding for gender equality related programs and the shortfall in funding to address the gender gaps and needs.

Project Activities: These will be jointly executed by 18 organizations all of which are headed by females.

a)      Conduct study of 6 pilot councils that were committed to GRB in 2011within the framework of the European Union funded PASOC Project. 2 research assistants on field visits will spend 2 days in each pilot council including Buea, Nguti, Ekondo Titi, Menji, Tinto and kumba I. They will use data gathering tools including questionnaires and focus group discussions to collect information (from mayors, secretaries general, treasurers and beneficiary populations) that will enable us to assess the implementation rate of the municipal decisions on GRB, the functioning of 6 focal points (organizations) that were constituted for proximity follow up as well as identify gaps, challenges and lessons learned which will be presented during the OBB workshop in activity 2.

b)     Organize a 3 day workshop and on Gender Responsive Budget Frameworks and Performance Measurement (OBB / RBB) involving 32 participants who will be council staff and women group representatives. Workshop contents shall include restitution of studies and validation of lessons learnt from activity 1 above, elaboration and validation of OBB / RBB Approach and municipal action plans for implementation during 2013 and 2014. This is an innovation because it will bring together council authorities and beneficiary groups in a unique forum and equip them with the necessary skills to maintain steady and measurable progress toward gender mainstreaming. They will jointly brainstorm on the needs and the strategies which should be put in place in the action plans.

c)      Support Popular Gender Audits in 16 councils (10 new ones as well as the 6 pilot). Women groups will be supplied with t-shirts, placards, banners, posters and fliers carrying gender sensitive information with focus on output or results based budget indicators. 100 women in each of the 16 councils will be transported to their council premises in order to conduct public manifestations during regularly scheduled council sessions to advocate and lobby municipal councilors to deliberate and adopt municipal decisions on RBB / OBB in their councils.

d)     Lobby the United Cities and Councils in Cameroon (UCCC) South West Region (SWR) to commit on a Gender Policy. This advocacy and lobbying activity will be held during the annual general assembly of all 33 councils in the region which will be attended by 10 gender activists with well defined terms of references. A draft generic gender policy document will be circulated (in advance) to all councils to enable adaptability to local realities by each member council. The UCCC/SWR (especially through its female and youthful members) will be urged to use their influence and internal communication mechanisms to foster gender mainstreaming within the region. This strategy is a novelty because it will intensify pressure on mayors to collectively undertake region wide commitments on a gender policy.

e)      Institute a Communication Plan for project visibility. All activities executed during the course of the project will be documented into reports and circulated to all stakeholders. An interactive website will carry all project activities such that researchers, students and development actors will have ready access. Furthermore,  a media blitz will be engaged to inform and educate the population using radio news programs and announcements, newspaper coverage and television prime time slots.

 

 

  1. 3.      Expected Results / Outcomes:

v  The technical capacity of 16 councils to integrate results and outputs into planning and budgeting improved by October 2013.

v  33 councils in the South West Region elaborate, deliberate and adopt Municipal Decisions bearing on Gender Policies within their municipalities by October 2013.

v  The abilities of women groups to monitor and enforce OBB in 16 councils increased by April 2013.

v  Information on council funding for gender equality programs is available and regularly updated by July 2013.

 

 

 

 

  1. 4.      Partnerships: Memorandum of Understanding /  Roles

A Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) will serve as the working document for a joint realization of Track II Project to Institutionalize Gender Responsive Budgeting in Councils of the South West Region of Cameroon with sponsorship from the UN Women. The project shall be jointly executed by 18 civil society organizations including Youth Alliance for Democracy and Development (YADD), Ekondo Women Foundation for Change (EWOFOC), Kumba Association Women Groups (KAWG), Menji Women Foundation for Change (MWOFOC), Nguti Women Foundation for Change (NWOFOC) Tinto Women Foundation for Change (TWOFOC) and Buea Women Forum.

Articles:

1)      That MUDEC Group and YADD including 6 resident Focal Organizations which are mostly women foundations for change (EWOFOC, KAWG, MWOFOC, NWOFOC, TWOFOC and Women Forum) in the pilot councils and 10 more women foundation for change which will initiated during the OBB workshop shall jointly execute the UN Women funded Track II Project to Institutionalize GRB in Councils of the South West Region of Cameroon.

2)      That the project duration shall be from January to November 2013.

3)      That a Project Committee comprising one representative from each organization above shall coordinate/monitor project activities (chaired by MUDEC and YADD as secretary).

4)      That funds will be requisitioned and disbursed based on agreed upon action plans within a finance management and control system.

5)      That the Project Committee shall hold quarterly review meetings including monthly joint monitoring field visits with competent resource persons.

6)      That the project shall operate a bank account with 3 signatories from the partners.

7)      That MUDEC Group shall serve as liaison between the partners and the UN Women.

8) That given their competencies and related on-going activities, project work is subdivided as follows:

No Activity  Role / Responsible
1 Conduct study in 6 pilot councils to ascertain the level of execution of Track I Project on GRB (restitute & validate findings/ lessons learnt) All Partners
2 Organize workshop and  on Gender Responsive Budget Frameworks MUDEC Group / YADD
3 Facilitate creation of 10 new functional Focal Organizations YADD / NWOFOC / EWOFOC
4 Support Popular Gender Audits / Manifestations on mainstreaming OBB / RBB  in 16 councils All Partners
5 Lobby UCCC / SWR for Gender Policy in member councils All Partners
6 Execute Communication Plan for project visibility MUDEC Group / YADD
7 Monitor project activities All Partners
8 Hold quarterly coordination meetings All Partners
9 Conduct Project Audit (mid term and final) YADD
10 Write and submit activity & financial reports to partners and the UN Women MUDEC Group / YADD

 

 

  1. 5.      Monitoring & Evaluation:
  • A monitoring team from amongst partner staff shall engage in participatory follow up of project activities and hold monthly reviews of planned activities to ascertain the rate of realisation and propose actions  to address gaps through monthly reports.
  • The Project Committee shall hold quarterly review meetings.
  • A joint project account shall be operated with three signatories coming from different partners. Disbursement and expenditure procedures shall be specified in a finance order that will constitute the contents of the MOU.
  • An external auditor shall be hired by the project committee to carry out two audits (mid term and final).
  • An end of project evaluation will be conducted so as to enable project partners determine best practices, lessons learnt and identify lapses inorder to improve on future performances.

All project activities will be monitored for results / outputs by a team using the (model) tool below.

Strategic Action to be accomplished:
Date of Monitoring and Evaluation:                         Person(s) Monitoring:
Resources needed:
What was planned to be done Person Responsible What has been done What still has to be done When should it be completed What will be there to show that it has been done Comments

and reactions of

the M&E team

Activity 1            
Activity 2            
Activity 3            
Activity 4            
Activity 5            

Main duties of the M & E team:

  • Follow up work done by resource persons and person ranking as such.
  • Execute periodic supervision visits to ensure that effective work is being done.
  • Obtain funds through communication with the competent persons or structures
  • Evaluate and Update the weekly, monthly and quarterly action plans.
  • Work in close collaboration with project officials.
  • Produce weekly, monthly & quarterly reports to the project committee.
  • Search alternative sources of funding to assure project sustainability

 

 

5.1 Communication Plan for Visibility and Sustainability:

We will ensure sustainability of program gains in two major aspects. Technical sustainability will include the transfer of skills such that the elaboration of Annual Operational Plans for councils will be output based. Also, the training curriculum at the Local Government Training Center for senior staff who is charged with drawing council budgets will include modules on OBB to better prepare them with tools needed to integrate results in their planning and budgeting. Furthermore, the critical mass of resource persons and focal institutions that will have benefited directly or otherwise will protect gains from the project by incorporating gender results based analysis in their work. They will also ensure that periodic budget tracking activities including popular budget hearings are held.  We will also solicit, secure and put in place technical advice and support from the international community such as GIZ, SNV, and UNIFEM who share our aspirations and which are based in Cameroon. All information generated will be hosted on a project website to enable the momentum thus created to remain accessible to future scholars, researchers and activists.  

 Financial sustainability will amongst others center on gender inclusive local council budgets beginning 2014 that will include line items for training on gender mainstreaming as well as for activities that cater for the felt needs of women and the girl child (RBB). Candidates for the 2013 twin elections (tentatively scheduled for July, August) will be lobbied to take an engagement to vote RBB / OBB at council levels. We will also request financial assistance from western organizations that have expressed interest in this domain.

 

  1. 6.      Budget Proposal (exchange rate of 450FCFA = $1.00):
No Output Unit Measure Unit Cost (FCFA) Total Cost (FCFA)
1.0 Conduct study on the level of execution of GRB in 6 pilot councils ( restitute & validate findings/ lessons learnt)      
1.1 Develop Questionnaire / Checklists

120 sets

100

12.000

1.2 Honorarium for 2 Research Assistants x 6 councils

24 days

50.000

1.200.000

1.3 Transportation for 2 Research Assistants x 6 councils

12 trips

25.000

300.000

1.4 Reporting

10 copies

5.000

50.000

1.5 Sub total

 

 

1.562.000

2.0 Organize workshop and  on Gender Responsive Budget Frameworks and Performance Measurement

 

 

 

2.1 Training Materials (assorted)

lump sum

150.000

150.000

2.2 Facilitation (Preparation, training, reporting) 2 x 6 days

12 days

50.000

600.000

2.3 Participant packs

32

3000

96.000

2.4 Participants Lodging (4 days)

128 nights

10.000

1.280.000

2.5 Feeding :

 

 

 

2.5.1 Dinner for 4 days

128

2500

320.000

2.5.2 Lunch for 3day

96

3000

288.000

2.5.3 Breakfast for 3 days

96

1500

144.000

2.6 Hall Hire

3 days

50.000

150.000

2.7 Transport for participants (round trip)

32

25.000

800.000

2.8 Reporting

20

5.000

100.000

2.9 Sub total    

3.928.000

3.0 Support Focal CSO for mainstreaming OBB in councils      
3.1 Produce Banners

16

25.000

400.000

3.2 Produce T shirts

1600

1500

2.400.000

3.3 Produce Placards

800

500

400.000

3.4 Produce Posters

800

100

80.000

3.5 Produce Fliers

2500

50

125.000

3.6 Purchase Water

1600

500

800.000

3.7 Purchase First Aid Kits

16

10.000

160.000

3.8 Participants Transportation (round trip)

1600

1000

1.600.000

3.9 Sub total    

5.965.000

4.0 Lobby UCCC / SWR for Gender Policy in member councils during 2013 Annual General Assembly      
4.1 Conception of Draft Gender Policy

2 consultants

250.000

500.000

4.2 Production of Draft copies of Gender Policy

35

10.000

350.000

4.3 Transportation of Gender Policy activists

10

25.000

250.000

4.4 Sub total    

1.100.000

5.0 Communication Plan for project visibility      
5.1 Radio Programs (monthly)

11

50.000

550.000

5.2 News paper articles (twice monthly)

22

15.000

330.000

5.3 Television slots (monthly)

11

100.000

1.100.000

5.4 Website (web master fees / monthly)

11

50.000

550.000

5.5 Sub total

 

 

2.530.000

6.0 Project Audits (mid term and final)

2

500.000

1.000.000

6.1 Sub total

 

 

1.000.000

7.0 Total  Costs    

16.085.000

8.0 10% Administrative costs    

1.608.500

9.0 Total Project Costs    

17.693.500

 

At the current exchange rate of 450FCFA = $1.00, the budget stands at US $ 39.318 (thirty nine thousand three hundred and eighteen dollars).

 

 

  1. 7.      Work plan (Activity Log):

 

Activity                      Months    (January to December 2013)
Jan Feb March April May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov
Conduct study in 6 pilot councils to ascertain the level of execution of Track I Project on GRB.(restitute & validate findings/ lessons learnt) XX                    
Organize workshop and  on Gender Responsive Budget Frameworks   XX                  
Facilitate creation of 10 new functional Focal Organizations   XX                  
Support Popular Gender Audits / Manifestations on mainstreaming OBB / RBB  in 10 councils     XX XX XX XX XX XX      
Lobby UCCC / SWR for Gender Policy in member councils           XX XX XX      
Execute Communication Plan for project visibility XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX
Monitor project activities XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX
Hold quarterly coordination meetings XX     XX     XX     XX  
Conduct Project Audit (mid term and final)         XX           XX
Write / submit activity & financial reports to partners and the UN Women         XX           XX

 

Annexes (MUDEC Competencies in Gender Governance)  

Þ    Gender Audit of Local Councils in Cameroon in collaboration with the Local Government Training Center (CEFAM)

Þ    Gender Audit Results Sharing with  Partners ( SNV, GIZ, HELVETAS,CEFAM)

Þ    The Bell Newsletters (March & October) with Partners (GNGG, FIDA, HELPOUT & OSIWA)

 


MUDEC & RUMPI Project

 

 

 

Agricultural Marketing: Market Functions,

Institutions and Channels for Agricultural Commodities.

 

 

 

 

By

 

 

 

 

Dr. M.T. Besong (Ph.D)

Farming System Research

And Extension Agronomist

Rumpi Project

 Introduction

Marketing is a process? The term “Marketing” means a different thing depending upon who is involved in it.

i)       To the housewife, marketing means shopping for groceries (food needs) and all other household needs.

ii)    For the farmer (food) or rancher (cattle), it means selling their commodities

iii)  To the handler of the commodity, means:

a)     Storing the commodity

b)    Transferring the commodity into a form that consumers want (e.g. cassava to garri),

c)     Shipping it to outlets for retail and

d)    Promoting its sale.

So all of the above things are part of the marketing process. The American marketing Association (AMA) has defined marketing as “The performance of business activities that direct the Flow of Goods and services from the producer to consumers or final user.

What does this mean in agricultural marketing? The point of production (the farm or ranch) is the basic source of supply. Therefore the marketing process begins at that point (farm or ranch and continuesuntil a consumer buys the product in the market places ir until it is purchased as a raw material for another production phase. Marketing also includes input supply firms that serve the farm or ranches. Thus, markeying consist of those efforts that affect;

a)     Transfer of ownership and

b)    Which ereate TIME, PLACE and FORM Utility, to commodities.

 

What do you understand by Time, Place, and Form Utility?

–         Time utility is added to commodities through storage

–         Place satisfaction is added to – – commodities through transportation services

–         Form utility is added to a commodity through the processing function.

2.       Marketing Function

by marketing functions we mean the many activities that are performed in getting farm products from the producer to the consumer. It is these activities that are called functions. Who performs these functions in Cameroon? E.g. Cash crops: co-operatives and private firms (LBAs). For food crops: farmers to wholesellers, farm groups, and may be some NGOs. The market functions worth knowing which are widely accepted for classification purposes are:

  1. Exchange – buying and selling
  2. Physical – processing, storage, tansportation
  3. Facilitating – standardizing, financing, risk bearing and market information.

3.       Martet Institutions

These channels took at the activities of business organization or people involved in markeing. Whether organizations or people, they are considered playing the roles of middlemen. These middlemen are classified as follows:

  1. Merchant middlemen (retailers and wholesallers)
  2. Agent middlemen (brokers and commission men)
  3. Speculative middlemen
  4. Facilitative organizations
  5. Food processors.

However it is impotant to note that middlemen perform the operations necessary to transfer goods from the producer to the consumer. Middlemen do this beause of the benefit of specialization and scale that exist in marketing as well as in production. So rather than producers conducting all of the marketing functions, middlemen through specialization and division of labour Market Channels – involve ways by which agriculture products/commodities are marketed.

4.       Market Efficiency: Markets are efficient when the ratio of the valve of output to the

           value of input throughout the markeing system is maximized.

Two types of market efficiency:

  1. Technical efficiency
  2. Pricing efficiency

Any change that reduces marketing costs per unit of output is considered desirable.

 

5.       Ways of improving on Agricultural Marketing in Cameroon.

– General risk bearing

– Education

– Farmers to organize

– Market oriented production

– Specialized Production Concentrate on one or a few things and do it/them

 well

– Improve road infrastructure (communities and the state)

– Councils and Cooperatives/Groups should make availavble storage facilities.

 

Market: Buyers and sellers with facilities to communication with each other.

 

Market need not be a specific, although some people refer to market in this sense, such as commodity markets and auction markets.

 

The only requirement is that the forces of Demand and Supply, vice the communication between buyers and sellers determined market price.

 

Markets therefore must accomplish:

i)                   Determine demand and changes that the movement of commodities through the marketing system may be expedited.

ii)                Achieve efficiency in the marketing process by improving pricing and operational efficiencies.

 

Marketing Functions

Exchange: Rates place through out the market channel and include buyers bidding for the supplies of commodities and sellers offering commodities at the best price they think they can attain.

–         Locate supplies and assemble for shipping selling involves packages, labeling, advertising and promoting etc.

 

Physical

Adds form, time and place utility (value)

Processing – adds form

Storage – adds time

Transportation – adds place

 

Facilitating

Improves performance of marketing system by increasing operational pricing efficiencies e.g.

(i)                Standardizing establishes grades and quality criteria for a commodity

(ii)                  Financing

(iii)           Risk bearing

(iv)           Market information – collection, analyzing and dissemination information.

 

Important Concepts/Actors

Retail: Organization: Usually purchase for resale purchase from wholesalers taking title to the products products they handle.

 

Wholesalers:

Primary function is to hold inventories, package products in lots that meet consumer needs, prepare lots for shipment, and make arrangements for transpotation. They also provide credit to retailers, offer merchandising assistance and assume some of the risk the retailer would have to take if the retailer purchases from manufacturers.

 

Agent Middlemen:

They engage on negotiating that transfer the title of products from seller to buyer.

 

Brokers:

They bring buyers and sellers together. Brokers fee based on the amount of the sale.

Commission men:

 For agriculture producers are primary interested in grain, livestock and fresh fruits and vegetable. These have more authority than brokers in the selling of products.

Any product consigned to them is sold at the best price available. They collect on the sale of the product deduct their expenses and remit the balance to the seller.

 

Speculative Middlemen:

Take ownership of and hold commodities thus assuming the risk of loss due to unfavourable price fluctuation e.g. floor broken on commodity exchanges.

 

Facilitative Organization:

e.g. trade associations are institutions that provide general industry data that provide physical facilities for marketing. They also guide pricing results.

 

Processors:

Transform raw agricultural products into different final products.

 

PRESS RELEASE                  31st December 2010

 “Within the Framework of the Execution of the RUMPI Area Participatory Development Project, MUDEC Group is organizing a workshop on Organized Marketing for 100 women who are involved in the selling of RUMPI Project crops such as Cassava, Maize, Plantain and Yams.

The workshop will take place at the Presbyterian Church Center in Kumba from 7th and 8th January 2011. The invited women who have each been served an invitation are drawn from Muea & Muyenge in Fako Division; Banga Bakundu & Bole from Meme Division; Peng & Muambong from Kupe Mwanenguba Division; Alou, Ndungated & Lewoh from Lebialem Division; Bekora & Ekondo Titi from Ndian Division; and Afab & Mamfe in Manyu Division.

The main objective of the training is to Facilitate the Creation and Functioning of Food crop Marketing Cooperatives in the South West Region.

 The invited women are hereby urged to be present on time as all necessary logistics have been put in place at the Presbyterian Church Center in Kumba.

 All participants should arrive the Church Center on the 6th January 2011 as from 4 PM.

 They should call the numbers on their invitations if in any doubt.”  

 Charlie MBONTEH

Team Leader

                                             TABLE OF CONTENTS

         EXECUTIVE SUMMARY…………………………………………………………

         GENERALITIES OF THE WORKSHOP…………………………………………2

2.2 WELCOME & BACKGROUD OF THE RUMPI PROJECT…………………….2

2.3 WORKSHOP PROGRAM…………………………………………………………2

2.4 WORKSHOP OBJECTIVES………………………………………………………2

2.5 PARTICIPANTS EXPECTATIONS AND FEARS……………………………….2

2.6 WORKSHOP RULES………………………………………………………………2

2.7 WORKSHOP METHODOLOGY…………………………………………………..3

2.8 EXPECTED RESULTS…………………………………………………………….3

3. 0 CLARIFICATIONS OF BASIC TERMS………………………………………….3

4.1 AGRICULTURAL MARKETING IN THE SWR…………………………………..3

5.0 FORMATION OF FOOD CROP MARKETING COOPERATIVES……………11

6.0 REGISTRATION OF FOOD CROP MARKETING COOPERATIVES………..11

7.0 FUNCTIONING OF FOOD CROP MARKETING COOPERATIVES…………12

8.0 MANAGEMENT OF CROP MARKETING PROBLEMS………………………13

9.0 PARTICIPANT ACTION PLAN (PAPA)…………………………………………13

10.0 WORKSHOP EVALUATION……………………………………………………20

11.0 ANNEXES

     – Attendance sheets.

    –  presentations by Dr. Manfred Besong, Mr. Pius Vesoh, Mr. Joseph Tsebom &      Mr. Charlie Mbonteh.

    – Picture gallery, news items and press releases.

1.0         INTRODUCTION

2.0  GENERALITIES OF THE WORKSHOP

2.1  WELCOME

2.2  WORKSHOP PROGRAM & RESOURCE PERSONS

Workshop Timetable 

Day

8 – 9am

9 – 11am

11am – 1pm

1 – 2pm

2pm – 5.30pm

One

Breakfast & Introduction

SOWEDA, RUMPI & Agricultural Marketing in the SWR

Formation of Marketing Cooperatives

Lunch

Functioning of Marketing Cooperatives

Two

Breakfast

Functioning continued

Group Marketing Problems & Marketing Techniques

Lunch

Field Visits from the (Kumba Women Oil Cooperative, Plantain Market), Action Planning & Closing

 

The workshop had four Resource Persons:

Name & Current Position Task
Mr. Pius Vesoh, Regional Registrar of Cooperatives – South West (99 69 95 08) Formation & Registration of Marketing Cooperatives
Mr. Nwevebom Vigah Joseph Tsembon, Manager of Bamenda Cooperative Vegetable & Foodstuff Society Ltd (BCVS) 75 07 47 01 Functioning of Marketing Cooperatives
Mr. Charlie Mbonteh, Team Leader MUDEC Group77 64 94 30/ 94 34 43 52 Group Marketing Problems & Marketing Techniques.Action Planning & Coordination
Dr. Manfred Besong, Agronomist – RUMPI Project (77 76 49 73) Agricultural Marketing in the South West Region, Monitoring & Evaluation

 

2.3  WORKSHOP OBJECTIVES

  •          To enable Women groups involved in selling Cassava, Maize, Plantain and Yams Form and Operate Functioning Marketing Food crop Cooperatives.

 

 

EXPECTED RESULTS:

At the end of this workshop:

10 Food crop Marketing Cooperatives (3 for plantain, 3 for yams, 2 for Cassava and 2 for Maize) are created and are ready to become Functional.

2.5 PARTICIPANTS EXPECATIONS AND FEARS

2.6 WORKSHOP RULES

 (What can we do to make the workshop successful?)

-Respect time

-Active participation

-Cell phones off

-respect the ideas of others

-be orderly in talking

-cooperate and work in a team

2.7 WORKSHOP METHODOLOGY

The methodology used was participatory and designed to learn by doing. These included:

Group work

Participants led discussions

Questions  and Answers

 

 

Plenary

Présentation

animation

 

3.0 CLARIFICATION OF BASIC TERMS

A)    Cooperative

B)    Marketing

C)    Registration

D)    Formation

E)    Functioning

F)    Articles of association

G)    Board of Directors

H)    Annual General Meeting

I)       Ordinary General Meeting

J)      Extra Ordinary General Meeting

4.0  Background of SOWEDA and RUMPI

–          The aim is to reduce poverty in rural areas.

–          The women were thought why and how to produce in great quantities e.g. cassava, maize etc.

In September2010, kilogramsof maize and other foodstuffs was given or sold to farmers at cheaper price to increase their production and increase their standard of living.

–          31 tons of maize can plant1550 hectaresand a hectare is 100 by 100 (100/100)

–          A hectare can produce 4660 tons of maize.

–          1kg of corn is 195 FRS per kilo.

–          95765 tons of corn is produce from the 31 tons of corn.

There are55 farms with which RUMPI Project work with them.

In 2009, 300kg was still given to these women and 16 tons was realized.

           Marketing:

Marketing from the view point of farmers is to sell their produce. Their function is       to store their commodities, transform it if necessary or possible, retail, promotion.

–          Marketing has transfer of ownership as a main characteristic.

–          Timing is also very important in marketing.

–          Place/positioning of a market is important.

–          Utility i.e. the form in which you sell.

Transformed crops are more preferable than non-transformed crops because its more profitable.

–          Standardization i.e. price per kilo/liter.

–          Risk bearing.

–          Market information i.e. sensitizing farmers on how to produce ad sell.

Formation of a Cooperative.

v  What is cooperative?

A cooperative is coming together or a common bond that is democratically managed. A cooperative can help farmers to sell their produce. A member must contribute money for the functioning of the cooperative and every member is important in the cooperative. A cooperative can bargain better than individuals on issues such as prices, quantity, quality, weights and transportation costs..

Advantages of a Cooperative:

–          Legal personality (if a member of a cooperative has a problem, it is the cooperative that solves it and not the individual).

–          Cooperative can sue and be sued.

–          Cooperative does not pay taxes.

–          It provides services to its members.

–          Government gives assistance to cooperative.

Types of Cooperatives:

–          Marketing Cooperatives where members are mostly involved in marketing.

–          Production Cooperatives where members are mostly involved in production.

–          Processing Cooperatives where members are mostly involved in transformation.

–          Handicraft Cooperatives where the main activities are centered on handicraft.

–          Thrift and Loan Cooperatives where the main activities are centered on savings & loans.

Formation of a Cooperative

When forming a cooperative you follow the 2006 law of forming a cooperation to be legally registered. At least 7 people forms a cooperative that have common interest. These are the founding members who lay down the rules and regulation regarding Articles of Association (A.A)

–          Make a draft of the A.A

–          Hold a Constituent (initial) Meeting. In a constituent meeting, the date, time, venue should be taken note. The executive will be elected (7 members) and a manager  may be employed. At the end of the meeting, all participants sign and write their name and ID number.

–          Adoption of the Articles of Association after which all those present will sign at the end of the minutes of the constituent meeting.

–          Election of the first officials ( BOD, President, Vice, Secretary, Financial Secretary, Treasurer and Advisers)

–          Election of Supervisory Committee members

–          Appointment of an External Auditor

By Law the Articles of Association must include:

–          Creation and Name.

–          Life and Head Office.

–          Objectives and Area of jurisdiction.

–          Activities.

–          Records to be kept and by whom.

–          Membership (non political & religious).

–          Contract between the individual and cooperative.

–          Member’s rights to own shares.

–          Cooperative rights to elect their executives.

–          Member’s rights receive profit according to the number of shares bought.

–          The Cooperative right to issue fines on their members who have failed to meet up with the norms of the cooperative.

–          The General Assembly takes major decision of the cooperative.

–          The cooperative don’t pay members of the general assembly but can only be compensated for time lost.

–          The cooperative can apply for loans from the government, banks and even International organizations.

–          Surpluses are shared to members of the cooperative depending on their input.

–          If the cooperative suffers losses, all members are affected.                                                                                          

–          The cooperative has the right to employ a manager who is not a member of the cooperative. The manager will follow up the day to day running of the cooperative.

–          A cooperative can be split if it is too large.

–          A cooperative can transform into a Union of Cooperatives or Associations.

–          A cooperative can be dissolved after several years of operating. This can be done by selling its properties and settling its debt or sharing it to its members.

–          Members have the right to ask for access to documents of the cooperative.

–          Members have the right to make their Internal Regulations.

–          To transfer a cooperative head office, a new Articles of Association can be drawn.

Items needed to register a Cooperative.

–          Fiscal stamp

–          Adopted Articles of Association (3 copies)

–          Minutes of Constituent (first) Meeting (3 copies)

–          Photocopy of ID cards of the executive members.

–          A sketched map of the head office.

–          Copies of the Cooperative Law (3 copies).

–          At the end a certificate will be issued to give a legal opening of the cooperative.

            Functioning of a Marketing Cooperative

The individuals form the General Assembly because it appoints the General Manager.

There are 3kinds of General Assemblies which are;

–          Annual General Meeting. This is done 3months to the close of the financial year.

Members have the right to attend General Assembly meeting.

Member must follow what the General Assembly has decided upon.

–          Ordinal General Meeting

–          Extra ordinary meeting. It is held during emergencies. Members have the right to or not to attend as stated in Articles of Association.

The General Assembly

It should be noted that it is only during General meeting that A.A can be amended.

The General Assembly gives directives to BOD who in turn gives instructions to the manager. The General Assembly elects the supervisory committee who follows up the running and functioning of the cooperative.

            The Board of Directors (BOD)

–          The BOD have a maximum of 2 terms in office

–          The BOD constitutes of the following;

  • President, Vice, Secretary, Financial Secretary, Treasurer and Advisers

–          It is the BOD that gives instructions to the manager.

–          BOD are not paid but can be compensated for their time and transport fair.

–          The BOD issues shares for members to buy and raise funds.

–          The BOD decides the annual deposit of its members.

–          The chairperson of the BOD presides over all meetings.

The Supervisory Committee

–          The supervisory committee has the right to call a meeting if something is going wrong to find the solution.

The Manager

–          He takes instructions from the BOD

–          Draft suggestions in the cooperative and give to the BOD to be implemented.

–          Draft management report and make it available to the General Assembly.

–          Can negotiate with different markets to sell in their cooperative.

–          The manager keeps good record of the activities of the cooperative.

–          The post of manager is not also obligatory.

Organizational Structure of a Functioning Cooperative.

MANAGER

BOD

SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE

GENERAL ASSEMBLY DDJJLLLLLLLASSEMBLY

MARKETING

ACCOUNTING

PRODUCTION

PROCESSING

TRAINING

INDIVIDUAL MEMBERS

OGM (Ordinary General meeting),

AGM (Annual General Meeting),

 EGM (Extra-ordinary General Meeting)

Questions from participants and Answers from resource persons 

(1)   Orock Gladys Afab – Plantains

Q. Small farm holdings and how do they increase production.

A. Farmers are advised to use improved varieties so as to produce great quantities despite the size or hectares of land cultivated.

      (2) Ekopomu Patience Mamfe – Yams

Q. The relationship between marketing and farming and also wish to know if yam    seeds are given out to farmers?

  1. A.    Seeds of all RUMPI Project crops are given to farmers depending on their application and 33927 seeds of yams have been given out to farmers who have applied. The relationship between marketing and farming is that the aim of produce is for sale.

(3)   Odilia Enom Bekora – Yam

Q. Can other crops be produced by her group apart from yam?

A. RUMPI Project advertise their products and different groups apply on what they want and is given.   

 (4) Atabong Agnes Lewoh – Cassava

          Q. How to treat cassava because some get rotten before harvest?

          A. Local seeds is not encouraged but improved variety so that if the soil is bad the improved variety will not be affected much.

(5)   Odilia Ndim Peng – Corn

Q. Can the head quarter be out of area of cultivation?

A. The cooperative can be out of the area of cultivation but in the same

     Jurisdiction.

(6)    Orock Gladys

Q. When does the cooperative pay its members after collecting their food crops.

A. The cooperative pays its members instantly after handing their crops to the cooperative because it has money at its disposal to run the cooperative before selling it out to the general public.

           (7) Susan Ngoe Bole

Q. How can crops from different markets before separated from those who sell in Bole and are members of the cooperative?

A. Non-members of the cooperative sell their produce individually or can pass through a member of the cooperative to sell in the cooperative while members of the cooperative sell under their cooperative with no problem.

          (8) Odilia Enom Bekora

Q. Can a cooperative sell more than one product?

A. The cooperative can amend its Article of Association and notify its head office at Buea where the document will be added under the group in question.

(9) Odilia Ndim – Peng

Q. Can a non-participant of this workshop be an executive of the cooperative?

A. If a non-participant of the workshop is very active, she can still be voted. It’s just for the participants to enlighten her.

           (10) Efuth Anastasia – Alou Cassava

 Q. Can a man be a member of the cooperative?

 A. Yes a man can be a member but the women should have their conditions and lead since it was started by women.

            (11) Susan Ngoe – Bole

 Q. Where does the cooperative have kilos to measure their crops?

A. At the initial stage, the cooperative can only estimate but in the long run they can raise money to buy their. Also they can be given by development expert.

            (12) Ma Lucy – Mamfe

 Q. How can women who are members be treated if they are selling out of the cooperative?

A. They should be warned and later suspended if they do not change. Also the general public should be sensitized on the advantage of selling in a cooperative and be encouraged to become a member.

(13) Abia Martha – Peng

Q. What is the disadvantage of belonging to more than one cooperative producing the same crop?

A. There is no advantage because the woman is just dangling along the line instead she should register with a cooperative which produces a different crop.

          (14) Chima Loveline – Mbanga

Q. How can buyers buy directly in the cooperative?

A. Farmers should be encouraged to sell their products to the cooperative.

(15) Mue Prisca

Q. She wants to know whether she should she should start buying and selling or wait till the cooperative is opened?

A. She is advised to start her buyam-sellam until the cooperative is opened.

(16) Mr. Joseph

Q. How can money be raised in a cooperative?

A.    – Through shares

– Through loans

– Through cultivation of crops and selling

(17) Kome Florence – Tombel

Q. How can they start a cooperative?

A. – Minimize loss

     – Annual substitution

(18) Asong Marbel – Lewoh

Q. How can they register as a cooperative?

(19) Kubeh Getrude – Banga

Q. Will the cooperative buy more than the open market?

A. It is good to measure the products before sale so that nobody should be cheated.

(20).     Q.  How can cassava be stored or reserved?

A. Cassava can be processed, turned to Garry, water-fufu, or kum-nku

8.0 MANAGEMENT OF CROP MARKETING PROBLEMS

      Presentation on Group Marketing Problems

  1. Financial : Access to input supply
  2. Technical : Management, quality control, weights, transportation, pricing 
  3. Societal: Relations which social groups in the area
  4. Also:
  • Small quantity supply per farmer (coast/benefit) Economies of scale;
  • Actions of Uniform officers on the road, delay etc;
  • Seasonal fluctuation in supply;
  • Poor and seasonally impassable roads;
  • Unavailability of transport ( high fares);
  • Limited knowledge on Preservation and Processing (value adding);
  • Irregular & delayed payments for products or services supplied;
  • Insufficient local supply (need for importation).
  • Too much local supply (need for exportation)
  • Issues of  Accountabilit

Objective: To expose participants to various strategies involved in enhancing the smooth functioning of marketing cooperatives

Content:

  1. I.                 How to manage the market environment for commodities.

a)          The Product (Quantity & Quality);

b)          The Price (Costing & Break-even & Markup);

c)          The Place or Location (Place & Time & Transportation);

d)          The Promotion (Advertising & Public Relations);

II:    Strategies on How to increase sales of commodities (Pricing, Competition, Collaboration)

  1. Price Reduction;
  2. Discounts: – offer percentage (%) off regular price if purchase is made between a particular time periods;
  3. Credit  sales :- differed payment plus interest charges;
  4. Sales promotion : give “away” (  Buy certain quantity & get something free);
  5. Clearance sale :- for old stock to enable new stock to come in;
  6. Advertising :- Communicate with the general public;
  7. Diversification(into related products) & Mergers (with other related organizations)

9.0 Participant Action plan (PAPA) 

Activity Responsible Deadline Resources
Here we talk of what to do. Who to do what. Latest date or last day. What is needed to carry out the activity.

 

Muea Participants’ Action Plan (Elsie Jackai Tel: 77103833)

Activity

Responsible

Dead Line

Resources

1) Sensitize potential members All members/Elsie Jackai 25th February 2011 Door to doorTown CrierCredit correspondent

Church Announcement

2) Hold constituent/first meeting Elsie Jackai 25th February 2011 Court Hall
3) Develop Articles of  Association All members 25th February 2011 Paper
4) Register the Cooperative EXCO 25th February 2011 Transportation/Fiscal stamps
5) Request support from MUDEC/RUMPI Members 8th March 2011 Entertainment
6) Plan for field visit number 1 on Registration EXCO 8th March 2011 Transportation
7) Field visit number 2 on basic record keeping Members 31st March 2011 Basic tools
8) Field visit number 3 on group dynamics Members 15th April 2011 Basic tools
9) Field visit number 4 on support from RUMPI EXCO/Members 15th April 2011 TruckBasinCutlass

Bags, spraying Machine

Chemicals

 

 

Ngombo-Ku Participant Action Plan (Tel: 77274897)

Activity

Responsible

Dead Line

Resources

1.) Sensitize potential members All members/Ebontene Agnés 25th February 2011 – Church Announcement- Market Association
2.) Hold initial meeting Ebontene Agnés 25th February 2011 Town crier
3.) Develop Articles of  Association All members 25th February 2011 Papers
4.) Register the Cooperative EXCO 25th February 2011 Transportation/Fiscal stamps
5.) Request support from MUDEC/RUMPI Members 8th March 2011 Entertainment
6.) Plan for field visit number 1 on Registration EXCO 8th March 2011 Transportation
7.) Field visit number 2 on basic record keeping Members 31st March 2011 Basic tools
8.) Field visit number 3 on group dynamics Members 15th April 2011 Basic tools
9.) Field visit number 4 on support from RUMPI EXCO/Members 15th April 2011 – Truck- Grinning  Machine

 

Bole Participant Action Plan (Susan Ngoe, Tel: 77274897)

Activity

Responsible

Dead Line

Resources

1.) Sensitize potential members All members/Janny Dibo 25th February 2011 – Church Announcement- Market Visit- Town crier
2.) Hold constituent  meeting Janny Dibo 25th February 2011 In Aginnes Dioni’s Residence
3.) Develop Articles of  Association All members 25th February 2011 Papers
4) Register the Cooperative EXCO 25th February 2011 Transportation/Fiscal stamps
5) Request support from MUDEC/RUMPI Members 8th March 2011 Entertainment
6) Plan for field visit number 1 on Registration EXCO 8th March 2011 Transportation
7.) Field visit number 2 on basic record keeping Members 31st March 2011 Basic tools
8.) Field visit number 3 on group dynamics Members 15th April 2011 Basic tools
9.) Field visit number 4 on support from RUMPI EXCO/Members 15th April 2011 – Truck- Cutlass-Hoes

 

Bekora – Barombi Participant Action Plan (Tel: 70005196)

Activity

Responsible

Dead Line

Resources

1) Sensitize potential members All members/Odilia Enokweri 25th February 2011 TransportationAir time credit
2) Hold initial meeting Odilia Enokweri 25th February 2011 Church Announcement
3) Develop Articles of  Association All members/ Odilia Enokweri 25th February 2011 President’s House
4) Register the Cooperative EXCO 25th February 2011 TransportationFiscal stamps.Feeding/lodging
5) Request support from MUDEC/RUMPI Members 8th March 2011 Entertainment
6) Plan for field visit number 1 on Registration EXCO 8th March 2011 Transportation
7) Field visit number 2 on basic record keeping Members 31st March 2011 Basic tools
8) Field visit number 3 on group dynamics Members 15th April 2011 Basic tools
9) Field visit number 4 on support from RUMPI EXCO/Members 15th April 2011 TruckRound jars to put oilBasin

Bucket

 

Peng Participant Action Plan (Muweh Prisca Nange; Tel: 74432630)

Activity

Responsible

Dead Line

Resources

1.) Sensitize potential members All members/NtubeAlice 25th February 2011 – Transportation- Church Announcement
2.) Hold constituent  meeting Ntube Alice 25th February 2011 Sister Magdalene’s House
3.) Develop Articles of  Association All members 25th February 2011 Papers
4.) Register the Cooperative EXCO 25th February 2011 TransportationFiscal stamps. 
5.) Request support from MUDEC/RUMPI Members 8th March 2011 Entertainment
6.) Plan for field visit number 1 on Registration EXCO 8th March 2011 Transportation
7.) Field visit number 2 on basic record keeping Members 31st March 2011 Basic tools
8.) Field visit number 3 on group dynamics Members 15th April 2011 Basic tools
9.) Field visit number 4 on support from RUMPI EXCO/Members 15th April 2011 – Truck- Cutlass- Basin

– Spraying Machine

 

Lewoh Participant Action Plan (Njuzy Stella, Tel: 74257031)

Activity

Responsible

Dead Line

Resources

1.) Sensitize potential members All members/Njuzy Stella 25th February 2011 – Town cryer- Church Announcement
2.) Hold constituent  meeting Njuzy Stella 25th February 2011 Church Hall
3.) Develop Articles of  Association All members 25th February 2011 Papers
4.) Register the Cooperative EXCO 25th February 2011 TransportationFiscal stamps. 
5.) Request support from MUDEC/RUMPI Members 8th March 2011 Entertainment
6.) Plan for field visit number 1 on Registration EXCO 8th March 2011 Transportation
7.) Field visit number 2 on basic record keeping Members 31st March 2011 Basic tools
8.) Field visit number 3 on group dynamics Members 15th April 2011 Basic tools
9.) Field visit number 4 on support from RUMPI EXCO/Members 15th April 2011 – Cutlass- Spraying Machine

 

Afab Participant Action Plan  

Activity

Responsible

Dead Line

Resources

1) Sensitize potential members All members/Orock Gladys 25th February 2011 Town crierMotor Bike
2) Hold constituent  meeting Orock Gladys 25th February 2011 Class room
3) Develop Articles of  Association All members 25th February 2011 Papers
4) Register the Cooperative EXCO 25th February 2011 TransportationFiscal stampsFeeding
5) Request support from MUDEC/RUMPI Members 8th March 2011 Entertainment
6) Plan for field visit number 1 on Registration EXCO 8th March 2011 Transportation
7) Field visit number 2 on basic record keeping Members 31st March 2011 Basic tools
8) Field visit number 3 on group dynamics Members 15th April 2011 Basic tools
9) Field visit number 4 on support from RUMPI EXCO/Members 15th April 2011 CutlassSpraying MachineTruck

Basin

 

Mamfe Participant Action Plan (Monecho Pauline, Tel: 79135399) 

Activity

Responsible

Dead Line

Resources

1) Sensitize potential members All members/Lucy Ayuketta 25th February 2011 TransportChurch Announcement 
2) Hold constituent  meeting Madam Lucy Ayuketta 25th February 2011 All the Market Centers
3) Develop Articles of  Association All members 25th February 2011 PapersFiscal stamp
4.) Register the Cooperative EXCO 25th February 2011 TransportationFiscal stampsLodging/feeding
5) Request support from MUDEC/RUMPI Members 8th March 2011 Entertainment
6) Plan for field visit number 1 on Registration EXCO 8th March 2011 Transportation
7) Field visit number 2 on basic record keeping Members 31st March 2011 Basic tools
8) Field visit number 3 on group dynamics Members 15th April 2011 Basic tools
9) Field visit number 4 on support from RUMPI EXCO/Members 15th April 2011 Spraying MachineTruckBasin

 

Three Corners Ndungated – Alou Participant Action Plan

(Efuet Ncha Anastasia, Tel: 75801661)

Activity

Responsible

Dead Line

Resources

1) Sensitize potential members All members/Efuet Anastasia 25th February 2011 MotorcycleCommunication CreditMarket Visit

Church Announcement 

2) Hold constituent  meeting Efuet Anastasia 25th February 2011 President’s House
3) Develop Articles of  Association All members 25th February 2011 Papers 
4) Register the Cooperative EXCO 25th February 2011 TransportationFiscal stamps
5) Request support from MUDEC/RUMPI Members 8th March 2011 Entertainment
6) Plan for field visit number 1 on Registration EXCO 8th March 2011 Transportation
7) Field visit number 2 on basic record keeping Members 31st March 2011 Basic tools
8) Field visit number 3 on group dynamics Members 15th April 2011 Basic tools
9) Field visit number 4 on support from RUMPI EXCO/Members 15th April 2011 Spraying MachineTruck/cutlass/hoesWheelbarrow

Fertilizer

Rain boots, etc

Banga Bakundu Participant Action Plan

Activity

Responsible

Dead Line

Resources

1) Sensitize potential members All members/Kubeh Gatrude 25th February 2011 Communication CreditMarket DiscussionChurch Announcement 
2) Hold initial meeting Kubeh Gatrude 25th February 2011 Council Hall
3) Develop Articles of  Association All members 25th February 2011 Papers 
4.) Register the Cooperative EXCO 25th February 2011 TransportationFiscal stamps
5.) Request support from MUDEC/RUMPI Members 8th March 2011 Entertainment
6.) Plan for field visit number 1 on Registration EXCO 8th March 2011 Transportation
7.) Field visit number 2 on basic record keeping Members 31st March 2011 Basic tools
8.) Field visit number 3 on group dynamics Members 15th April 2011 Basic tools
9.) Field visit number 4 on support from RUMPI EXCO/Members 15th April 2011 – Truck- Cutlass- Basin

 

 10.0          WORKSHOP EVALUATION

 What we liked:

a)      Workshop well organized, lessons well understood, breakfast & lunch were satisfying.

b)      Lectures, Feeding, Accommodation, and Togetherness & Transport paid.

c)      The venue, breakfast & lunch, teaching techniques well understood especially those from Dr. Manfred Besong.

d)     The questions and answers session and group work.

e)      The advices on how to network with local councils from Mr. Charlie Mbonteh

f)       Resource persons were polite, lively and explained topics to the understanding of all participants.

g)      Workshop was knowledgeable, interesting, good environment, good food, freedom of speech, hospitable.

 What we did not like:

a)      The number of days for the workshop was short.

b)      Misuse of toilet facilities by some participants.

c)      Some participants came very late.

d)     There was too much noise in the hall especially during group work.

e)      Supper or Dinner was inadequate.

f)       Drinks were not served to participants.

 Vote of Thanks

Participants nominated Mrs. Orock Gladys to speak on their behalf. She thanked the RUMPI Project for the kind gesture and hoped that MUDEC group will not give up or slow down its effort at ensuring that the action plans are executed with maximum and timely follow up.

 Formation of an Apex Structure (Think Tank):

An apex think tank comprising one woman per participating group was constituted (through election). This group will attempt to keep its members abreast with any developments at the levels of RUMPI, MUDEC or any future development partners who will be interested to collaborate with them.

No Name Position Group of Origin Contact
01 Ekpombeng Patience President Mamfe 79 13 53 99
02 Efuetncha Anastasia Vice President Ndundated 75 80 16 61
03 Ebontene Agnes Secretary Ngombo Ku 77 27 48 97
04 Chima Loveline Vice Secretary Banga 78 45 84 83
05 Enokwei Odilia Financial Secretary Bekora 70 00 51 96
06 Ntube Alice Vice Financial Secretary Peng 70 34 54 81
07 Atabong Agnes Treasurer Akeh/Lewoh 75 43 16 75
08 Ngoe Suzanne Vice Treasurer Bole 74 55 89 70
09 Jackai Elsie Adviser No 1 Muea 77 10 38 33
10 Orock Gladys Adviser No 2 Afab 77 02 00 54

 11.0    ANNEXES

 

Workshop Participation Rate

No

Crop

Group

(Market)

Council

No Invited

No Present

No Absent

% Participation

01

Cassava

Ngombo Nku

Tombel

10

7

3

70

02

Cassava

Alou

Alou

10

10

100

03

Maize

Muea

Buea

10

3

7

30

04

Maize

Peng

Tombel

10

6

4

60

05

Plantain

Afab

Eyumojock

10

9

1

90

06

Plantain

Ndungated, Lewoh

Alou

10

8

2

80

07

Plantain

Bole

Mbonge

10

8

2

80

08

Yam

Banga

Mbonge

10

10

100

09

Yam

Bekora

Ekondo

10

4

6

40

10

Yam

Mamfe

Mamfe

10

8

2

80

11

Total

100

73

27

73%

 

a)     number of Food crop Cooperatives invited & created = 10 (2 each for cassava and maize, 3 each for plantain and yams)

b)    Number of women invited = 100, number of women who participated = 73 (73% participation rate).

c)     Analysis per crop:

i)                   Cassava: 20 women invited and 17 participated (85%).

ii)                Maize: 20 women invited and 9 participated (45%).

iii)              Plantain: 30 women invited and 25 participated (83%).

iv)              Yams: 30 women invited and 22 participated (73%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


MUDEC & PNDP collabration (Toko Council)

 

REPUBLIC OF CAMEROON

———

Peace – Work – Fatherland

———-

MINISTRY OF ECONOMY, PLANNING AND REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT

———-

GENERAL SECRETARY

———-

NATIONAL COMMUNITY DRIVEN DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

———-

 

SOUTHWEST REGIONAL COORDINATION UNIT

————

 

REPUBLIQUE DU CAMEROUN

————

Paix – Travail – Patrie

———–

MINISTERE DE L’ECONOMIE, DE LA PLANIFICATION ET DE L’AMENAGEMENT DU TERRITOIRE

————-

SECRETARIAT GENERAL

————

PROGRAMME NATIONAL DE DEVELOPPEMENT PARTICIPATIF

————

CELLULE REGIONALE DE COORDINATION DE SUD OUEST

————

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CONSOLIDATED DIAGNOSIS REPORT

 COMMUNAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN FOR TOKO COUNCIL

 

PREPARED BY: MUDEC Group, Buea.

                               South-West Region.

 

SUBMITTED TO: PNDP Regional Coordination Unit (RCU) Buea,

                                South West Region

November, 2011

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS
   
Title Pages
Table of Contents ii
List of Abbreviations iii
List of Tables iv
List of  Figures and Maps iv
Executive Summary v
1. 0.     INTRODUCTION 1
1.1.      Context and Justification 1
1.2.      Participatory Diagnosis Objectives 2
1.3.      Structure of the Document 2
2. 0.     METHODOLOGY 3
2.1.      Preparation of the Process 3
2.2.       Collection and Treatment of Data 3
2.3.       Data Consolidation and Mapping 5
3.0.      CONSOLIDATED RESULTS OF THE PARTICIPATORY DIAGNOSIS 7
3.1.     Summary of Basic Data(Council population, ethnic groups, biophysical environment) 7
3.2.     Maps (Cameroon, South West Region, Toko) 13
3.3.      Reference Situation per Sector 15
3.3.1.  Excel Sheets 15
3.3.2.  Assets, Potentials, Constraints 15
3.3.3.  Synthesis of Main Economic (trade)Activities 16
3.3.4.  Synthesis of Main Institutions 16
3.3.5.   Synthesis of CID (Council SWOT & Priority Areas for Reinforcement) 18
3.3.6.   Land Use Map 22
3.3.7.   Consolidated Problems & Needs per Sector (Villages, Causes, Effects) 23
4.0.     CONCLUSION 33
ANNEXES : 34
Summary Results of Participatory Village Diagnosis per Sector 34
Problem Analysis and Log frames per Sector 53
Village Priority Projects and Village Development Committees 131
List of External Resource Persons 155
   
     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LISTS OF ABBREVATIONS

 

CEFAM        Centre de Formation de l’Administration Municipale (Local Government Training Center)

CDP                Communal Development Plan

CSO                Civil Society Organisation

CIG                 Common Initiative Group

FEICOM        Fonds Special d’Equipement et d’Intervention Intercommunale

(Special Council Support Fund for Local Authorities)

FSLC              First School Leaving Certificate

GCE                General Certificate of Education

GNS                Government Nursery School

GHS                Government High School

GPS                Government Primary School

GSS                 Government Secondary School

GPS                 Global Positioning System

HPI                  Heifer Project International, Cameroon

LBA                Licence Buying Agent

MINFOF        Ministry of Forestry and Wildlife

MUDEC          Municipal Development Counselling Group

NBDC             National Book Development Council

NTFP             Non Timber Forest Products

OSRI               Organization for Sustainable Rural Infrastructure

PTA                Parents Teachers Association

 PNDP            Programme Nationale Developpement Participatif (National Community Driven Development Program)

SDO                Senior Divisional Officer

SG SOC          Sithe Global (American Palm Investing Company)

SWOT           Strengths Weaknesses Opportunities Threats

TOC               Toko Council

VDC               Village Development Committee

 

 

 

 

 

 

LIST OF TABLES

 

Table 1: Different Ethnic Groups…………………………………………………………………………8

Table 2:  Population Densities by Age Groups……………………………………………………..10

Table 3:   Population Distribution by Gender………………………………………………………..11

Table 4: Assets, Potentials and Constraints…………………………………………………………..15

Table 5: Synthesis of Main Economic Activities…………………………………………………..16

Table 6: Main Institutions and Problems encountered…………………………………………….17

Table 7: Analysis of Primary and Nursery schools within Toko Municipality …………35

Table 8: List of Nursery and Primary schools needed ……………………………………………36

Table 9: Enrolment in Secondary Schools ……………………………………………………………38

Table 10: List of Secondary Schools needed…………………………………………………………38

Table 11: Consolidation of data on health ……………………………………………………………40

Table 12: Diagnosis of water situation in the Municipality …………………………………….42

Table 13: Diagnosis on Bore Hole ………………………………………………………………………43

Table 14: Diagnosis of Electricity ………………………………………………………………………44

Table 15: Forest reserve in the council area …………………………………………………………45

Table 16: Diagnosis of Market Infrastructure ………………………………………………………51

 

 

LIST OF FIGURES & MAPS

 

Figure 1: Population distribution by Age Groups………………………………………………….10

Figure 2: Population distribution by Gender…………………………………………………………12

Figure 3: Map of South West showing TOC…………………………………………………………13

Figure 4: Map of TOC……………………………………………………………………………………….14

Figure 5: Land use Map of TOC………………………………………………………………………….22

Figure 6: Enrollment in Basic Education………………………………………………………………34

Figure 7: Teacher situation in Basic Education……………………………………………………..34

Figure 8: Enrolment in Secondary Education………………………………………………………..37

Figure 9: Teacher situation in Secondary Education………………………………………………37

Figure 10: Need of benches in Secondary Education …………………………………………….39

Figure 11: Situation of Health Personnel ……………………………………………………………..41

Figure 12: Distribution of Forest Reserves …………………………………………………………..46

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

 

A major expected result within the framework of the elaboration of the Communal Development Plan of Toko municipality is the production of the consolidated diagnosis report which constitutes the totality of all information gathered and analyzed from all forty nine villages found in the council area. The report is presented in five principal sections including; executive summary, introduction, methodology, consolidated results of participatory diagnosis and conclusion. The primary objective is to analyze and document sector by sector the data collected to enable coherent planning for each sector. The methodology utilized involved three stages including; preparation, data collection and analysis, consolidation and mapping. Twelve research assistants were deployed for this exercise.

The preparatory stage started with an orientation workshop for the LSOs in Ekona. This workshop was replicated to other staff members and baseline data collected from several sources within and outside the council. Several planning and sensitization meetings were held during which identified stakeholders were actively involved. The official workshop to launch effective field operations took place in Toko town on 5nd August 2011.

Information was collected and diagnosed from all forty nine (49) villages within the municipality. From the findings during field operations few key sectors (agriculture, forestry, territorial administration, public security, public health, basic education, commerce and secondary education) are actively represented within the municipality. In the domain of basic education, there are two nursery and twenty one primary schools which are largely ill equipped with teachers, tables, chairs, benches and buildings. In the health sector there are three centres (two owned by the government while one is owned and operated by the Presbyterian Church in Cameroon) all of which are ill equipped with dilapidated structures. The centre in Toko is practically abandoned and lying in waste. The agriculture and forestry sectors each have a post that conducts limited activities. There is an office for the local administration and a brigade for the gendarmerie. A market and a village bank which were constructed with support from the Rumpi Project are under utilized.

Information collected was analyzed with a variety of tools and consolidated into excel sheets. This enabled the production of the draft strategic plan which was the working document for the planning, resource mobilization and programming workshop.

Diagnosed information using statistical software facilitated the differentiation and presentation of qualitative and quantitative analysis. GIS software was used for the production of geo referenced maps. The GPS points were also collected. The consolidated data (presented on excel sheets) was analyzed to generate tables, graphs, pie charts and bar charts.

 

1.0.         INTRODUCTION

1.1.            Context and Justification

The Government of Cameroon in July 2004 enacted the Law on Decentralization as Applicable to Local Council which mandated councils to provide basic services in several domains including economic, social, health, education, and culture and sports development within their municipalities. The Government has since fostered the process through other instruments such as the Growth and Employment Strategy Paper, the MDGs, the MAPUTO & ACCRA Conventions which are geared at making the country an emergent economy by 2035. Councils have received funds transferred through the Public Investment Budget (PIB) in some key ministries such as Basic and Secondary Education, Public Health, Women Empowerment and Social Affairs to mention but a few.

The following decrees have also fostered the process:

v  Decree N° 2010/0242/PM of 26th February 2010 with regards to the promotion of agricultural production and rural development.

v  Decree N° 2010/0242/PM of 26th February 2010 with regards to the promotion of livestock and fish farming.

v  Decree N° 2010/0242/PM of 26th February 2010 with regards to the construction and maintenance of rural unclassified roads and with  regards to potable water supply in the zones not covered by the public network for the distribution of water conceded by the State.

Further to all these efforts, the National Community Driven Development Programme (PNDP) was commissioned to contribute meaningfully toward poverty alleviation using participatory strategies at the level of local councils. Within the framework for the execution of the PNDP, a cooperation agreement was signed on July 4th 2011 in Ekona between Toko Council, the PNDP and MUDEC Group (a Local Support Organization) in which the PNDP has offered technical and financial support to enable MUDEC Group accompany Toko Council toward the elaboration of its Communal Development Plan (CDP).

A major output of the planning process is the production of a council monograph which represents a sector by sector consolidated report of the findings within each village.

 

1.2.            Participatory Diagnosis Objectives

  • To analyze and document sector by sector the data collected to enable coherent planning for each sector
  • To facilitate knowledge on the development needs in each sector within the municipality.

 

1.3.      Structure of the Document

            The structure of this report constitutes the following sections:

  • Executive Summary
  • Introduction.
  • Methodology.
  • Consolidated Results of Diagnosis.
  • Conclusion
  • Annexes

2.0.         METHODOLOGY

2.1.            Preparatory Process

The preparatory process for the elaboration of the CDP of Toko council area involved several stakeholders and activities. It started with a two week training of key LSO personnel in Ekona which was facilitated by officials of the PNDP. The training ended with the signing of the execution contract between the council, the LSO and the PNDP South West Regional Coordination Unit. The training was thereafter resituated to other MUDEC research assistants while several brainstorming and planning sessions were held with Toko council management.  Secondary data on the socio economic and environmental situation within the municipality was collected and triangulated at the sub divisional, divisional and regional levels of technical services. The council guided by its LSO elaborated a sensitization campaign involving a combination of radio and Church announcements, banners, fliers and the village criers targeting stakeholders including traditional authorities, social and cultural groups, women and youth group representatives, the local heads of technical services, socio professional groups and international organizations operating within the municipality. All sensitization material carried the planning process as well as messages designed to heighten participation of all stakeholders. This process ended with the holding of the official launching workshop on the 5th of August 2011. MUDEC presented an elaborate program of the data to be collected at the council, urban space and in all villages per sector. A Steering Committee was proposed by the mayor and installed by the traditional authorities and the PNDP representatives. Their clearly defined terms of reference were presented to the villagers by the LSO. An expected result was for stakeholders to return with concise memories of their roles and responsibilities in the data collection process. The workshop had 114 participants who represented all shades of opinion within the municipality.

2.2.            Information Collection  and Analysis

Primary data was collected and diagnosed at three different levels namely; the Council Institutional Diagnosis (CID), the Urban Space Diagnosis (USD) and the Sectorial Village by Village Diagnosis. During the CID, researchers started with literature review by reading through council documents relating to financial, material and personnel matters. Interviews and focus group discussions were also conducted to enable the team update and triangulate information gathered. At the internal level of the CID, council service heads such as the Mayor, councilors, Secretary General, Civil Status Registrar and the Finance Clerk represented sources of information while at the external level traditional and religious authorities, VDC members, technical service heads, contractors, beneficiaries of council services and development partners such as KORUP and SITHE GLOBAL were interviewed. Through this method, descriptive data was collected on the systems, structures, staff, management style, culture of the council as well as established the strengths and weaknesses of the council. Data related to the level of interaction between development partners and the council was collected. Data was collected using a variety of tools including semi structured interviews, direct observations, focus discussions and questionnaires. All information collected was triangulated with other sources at the council, divisional or regional levels.

The USD was conducted in Madie I which is the commercial center and in Toko which is the seat of the local administration. Both locations are sparsely populated and have little to show in terms of infrastructure. The services of local facilitators and the use of village criers contributed to the high rate of participation in almost all forty nine villages. Data was collected and analyzed using a variety of tools including participatory mapping, socio economic and environmental surveys and meetings with socio professional group representatives. Participants also engaged in transect walks, simple ranking, producing venn diagrams, focus group discussions and problem analysis using problem and objective trees. Waypoints were collected using the Global Positioning System (GPS). Interactive discussions, direct observations and site visits were also utilized in certain areas in the municipality. The historical timeline assisted participants to identify previous development efforts and their partners within the urban spaces.

The participatory village by village and sector by sector diagnosis covered 49 villages in the municipality including; Toko, Bweme, Mobenge, Ikoti I, Ikoti II,  Bekita, Bokuba, Iboko, Meangwe I, Bonabeanga, Basari,  Nwamoki, Iyombo, Ikoi,  Dikome,  Iwasa,  Ngamoki I,  Moboka, Madie, Madie New Town, Madie III Boembe, Mapanja (Ngamoki II), Mofako, Dienge, Dipundu , Tombe, Banyo, Ndoi,  Itali,  Debonda Koroki, Debonda Mosina, Masaka,  Bombangi, Babiabanga, Ipongi, Bareka II, Lobe Batanga, Baromba,  Bareka I, Manya,  Lipenja, Ikenge, Esukotan, Iyoe, Illondo, Kilekile, Mayeka,Esoki and Lowe.

A total of twelve researchers with clearly defined terms of reference were constituted into three teams of four individuals. They spent an average of three days per village in order to collect and diagnose information as prescribed in the PNDP methodology.

The village by village and sector by sector data collection and diagnosis (Problem Identification and Analysis) were participatory in that all the different stakeholders and all shades of opinion were given equal opportunities to make valuable contributions. During plenary exercises men, women and youth collectively identified the core problems per sector which were later prioritized, analyzed and reformulated using problem and objective trees for causes and effects.

Participatory Rural Appraisal (PRA) methods with gender considerations were utilized to assemble field realities. These included: meetings, semi structured interviews, focus group discussions, participative mappings, transect walks, simple ranking, venn diagrams, and problem analysis using problem and objective trees.   Interactive discussions, direct observations and site visits were also utilized in certain areas in the municipality. Waypoints were collected using the Global Positioning System (GPS). Information collected was triangulated with various sources at the council, sub divisional, divisional and regional levels.

 

Focus group Discussion

Participatory diagnosis/gender approach in diagnosis

 

2.3.            Data Consolidation & Mapping

 

The consolidated data (presented on excel sheets) was analyzed using software that enabled us to generate tables, graphs, pie charts and bar charts. The GIS software also assisted in the production of geo referenced maps.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Villagers using planning Materials

Collection of GPS points in Lipenja.

Display of information sheets.

Participatory mapping.

Participatory Village meetings.

Village Housing.

Data Collection in Villages.

3.0.                           CONSOLIDATED RESULTS OF THE PARTICIPATORY DIAGNOSIS.

3.1.         Synthesis of Basic General Data 

 

The council was created within the framework of decree no. 77/203 of 19th June 1977 to setup councils and define their boundaries. A Presidential decree in April 1995 created Toko District which was later upgraded to a sub division by another decree in 2009. It is located between latitude 465133, 600763 N and longitude 493410, 5360303 E with an altitude of about 795 above sea level at Ndoi/ Bombangi. It is bordered to the north by Dikume Balue, to the south by Eyumojock, to the east by Konye and Nguti and to the west by Mundemba.

The council is located about forty two (42) km away from Mudemba which is the seat of the Divisional Administration of Ndian.

Description of the Biophysical Environment

Climate

Toko municipality has an equatorial climate where there are two distinct seasons: a long rainy season of about eight months and a relatively shorter dry season of about four months.  The annual amount of rainfall ranges from 3500mm to 5000mm.The rainfall pattern provides suitable conditions for the growth of both perennial and annual crops thus allowing for two cropping seasons a year. Rainfall is a major determinant on agricultural production in terms of the crops grown, the farming system and the sequence and timing of farming operations.

Daily temperatures are relatively moderate throughout the year and ranges from 20°C to 30°C. Humidity varies with the absolute value and the seasonal distribution of rainfall, being uniformly moderate throughout the wet season, and falling to lower levels during the dry season

Soils

The Toko municipality has rich clay loam and lateritic soil type which is very fertile for agricultural production.  This has greatly influenced the cultivation of both cash and food crops. Due to poor farming techniques in the area, the soil is gradually losing its fertility.

Relief 

The topography is undulating with hills and slopes ranging from between 200 to about 1000m.  Hence, movement from one village to the other within municipality which is done primarily on foot as result of the poor road network is very difficult.

Hydrology

The Toko council area has so many streams, springs and waterfalls which have direct bearings with the river Meme which takes it rise from the Rumpi Hills as it drains the highlands of Madie, Dikome Balue and the coastal lowlands of Mbonge in the Meme Division before emptying into the Atlantic Ocean. The Combrany River which originates from within Toko municipality also empties itself into the Meme River.  These features can serve as potential tourist sites within the municipality when developed. Despite the seemingly abundant availability of ware, only three villages have made meaningful effort at having portable water supply including Madie Ngolo, Madie New Town and Toko. The rest of the population depends entirely on springs, streams and rainfall as sources of drinking water.

 Vegetation and Fauna.       

The vegetation is characterised by the evergreen tropical forest most of which contains tree species of immense economic value. The Korup Project, Rumpi Hills and Philanthropic forest reserves of the area contains a rich variety of flora and fauna. Many non-timber forest products are also found, including kola nuts and bush pepper, njansang, bitter cola and a variety of medicinal plants.

The difference in topography, vegetation and climate gives rise to a variety of both food and cash crops which includes; banana, cocoyam, maize, cassava, plantains cocoa, and oil palm. Cocoa is the main cash crop within the municipality.

Some of the animal species includes; elephants, monkeys, porcupines etc.

 

The History of the People within the municipality (origin of the people, population, ethnic groups, religions, main economic activities)

Ethnic Groups and inter-ethnic relations

The indigenes of Toko municipality comprise the Ngolo, Batanga and Bakoko. There are other migrants from different parts of the Cameroon such as the Bayangi, Dongolo, Bakundu and indigenes of North West Region are coexisting in the municipality and inter married.

 

Table 1: Different Ethnic Groups within the municipality

No. Villages Main Ethnic group Ethnic group 1 Ethnic group  2 Ethnic group   3 Ethnic group 4
1 Madie Ngolo Ngolo (Ekama Clan) Grass fielders Batanga
2 Madie New Town Ngolo (Ekama Clan) Batanga
3 Madie III Boembe Ngolo (Ekama Clan) Batanga
4 Banyo Ngolo
5 Iyombo Ngolo
6 Bonabeanga Ngolo
7 Mofako Batanga
8 Bweme Ngolo Dongolo Oroko
9 Dienge Ngolo
10 Ngamoki I Ngolo (Ekama Clan)
11 Illondo Ngolo
12 Kilekile Ngolo
13 Iwasa Ngolo
14 Mapanja (Ngamoki II) Ngolo (Ekama Clan)
15 Ikoi Ngolo
16 Iyoe Batanga
17 Mobenge Ngolo Oroko
18 Ndoi Ngolo
19 Dikome Ngolo Ngolo
20 Tombe Ngolo
21 Moboka Ngolo
22 Meangwe I Ngolo
23 Toko Ngolo Batanga Bakoko Orocko
24 Manya Ngolo
25 Mayeke Batanga
26 Bareka I Batanga
27 B asari Ngolo
28 Dipundu Batanga
29 Nwamoki Ngolo
30 Itali Batanga
31 Debonda II Batanga
32 Debonda I Batanga
33 Masaka Batanga
34 Bombangi Batanga
35 Ipongi Batanga
36 Babiabanga Batanga
37 Lobe Batanga Batanga
38 Bareka II Batanga
39 Betika Ngolo
40 Bokuba Ngolo
41 Iboko Ngolo
42 Lipenja Batanga Grassfielders
43 Baromba Batanga
44 Ikoti II Ngolo
45 Esoki Batanga
46 Lowe Batanga
47 Ikoti Ngolo
48 Ikenge Bakoko
49 Esukotan Bakoko Ngolo Bayangi Bakundu Grass fielders

                 Source: Village Survey (Aug. / Sept.  2011)

 

Religion

Christianity is the predominant religion within Toko Municipality and there is freedom of worship.  The main Christian denomination in the area is the the Presbyterians and Pentecostals.

The Presbyterian Church in Cameroon contributes to the development of the municipality by providing basic health facilities, such as the Presbyterian Health Center at Madie Ngolo.

 

Mobility of the population

The rate of movement into and out Toko Municipality is very low. This is due to a large extent to the absence of employment opportunities in the council area and the inaccessibility of villages within the municipality as a result of the poor road network. There are civil servants who have been transferred to the different schools and health centres within the Toko sub division and who are hardly around due to the harsh living realities in the council area.

There is high rate of rural exodus as people, especially the youth move from the municipality to other sub divisions and cities either to search for jobs, better education (attend universities or professional schools) and to do business.

Basic Socio Economic Infrastructure

Size and structure of the population

The total population size of Toko municipality in 2010 was estimated at seven thousand and thirty five (7.035) inhabitants of whom there are 3.515 men and 3.520 women. (Source: Bureau of Census & Population Studies). But from field survey, the population was estimate to be 14.045 inhabitants of whom   are men 3815,   women 4480 and 5625 being children.

 

The municipality has a total surface area of 103,413 hectares (1,034.13 km2) representing a population density of fifteen to thirty (15 to 30) inhabitants per km2 (source: South West Master Plan). This low population density in Toko is due to the dense tropical forest most of which are reserved. The table below shows the structure of the population within the municipality.

 

Table 2: Population Densities by age group

No. Age bracket

Total population

1 0-6years

395

2 6-14  years

2,327

3 15-19years

2,913

4 20-34years

7,323

5 35-59 years

536

6 60+ years

551

  Total

14.045

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fig: 1 Age structure of the population

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 3: Population distributions by gender in the Municipality

 

No.

Village Men Women Children Total

1

Madie Ngolo

100

100

500

700

2

Madie New Town

80

85

200

365

3

Madie III Boembe

60

63

150

273

4

Banyo

30

40

57

127

5

Iyombo

93

30

40

163

6

Bonabeanga

8

6

11

25

7

Mofako

150

300

400

850

8

Bweme

21

16

24

61

9

Dienge

262

200

150

612

10

Ngamoki I

207

293

110

610

11

Illondo

7

19

39

65

12

Kilekile

16

18

30

64

13

Iwasa

120

150

105

375

14

Nwamoki

29

55

30

114

15

Mapanja (Ngamoki II)

200

250

215

665

16

Ikoi

150

250

145

545

17

Iyoe

9

12

43

64

18

Mobenge

17

34

34

85

19

Ndoi

92

100

65

257

20

Dikome Ngolo

150

62

85

297

21

Tombe

11

10

17

38

22

Moboka

100

150

261

511

23

Meangwe I

150

159

291

600

24

Toko

250

261

300

811

25

Manya

1

0

0

1

26

Mayeka

5

4

1

10

27

Bareka I

120

200

120

440

28

Itali

60

90

70

220

29

Dibonda II

170

210

120

500

30

Dibonda I

50

95

65

210

31

Masaka

5

9

49

63

32

Bombangi

50

74

78

202

33

Ipongi

53

55

117

225

34

Babiabanga

45

50

105

200

35

Lobe Batanga

15

30

22

67

36

Bareka II

30

27

61

118

37

Betika

157

93

150

400

38

Bokuba

51

100

49

200

39

Iboko

100

105

45

250

40

Lipenja

100

117

283

500

41

Boromba

1

0

0

1

42

Ikoti II Batanga

210

190

300

700

43

Esoki

45

20

60

125

44

Lowe

1

1

5

7

45

Ikoti

22

40

18

80

46

Ikenge

80

100

170

350

47

Esukotan

150

200

160

510

48

Basari

15

15

20

50

49

Dipundu

12

12

15

39

  Total Population

3815

4480

5625

14.045

             

                 Source: Village Survey (Aug. / Sept.  2011)

 

 

 

 Fig 2: Population distribution by gender

From the analysis of the findings, men constitute 27% of the total population while women and children constitute 32% and 41% respectively. Persons of primary school age (6-14 years) represent 17 % of the population while individuals between the ages 20-34years make up 54% of the population thus indicating that Toko municipality has a very youthful population. This indicator is in line with the national trends in population.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.2.            Maps of Cameroon, South West Region & Toko

Fig 3: Map of the South West Region showing the Toko Council Area

 

 

 

Fig. 4: Map of TOC

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.3.            Reference Situation per Sector:

3.3.1.      Excel Sheets

3.3.2.      Natural Assets, Potentials and Constraints within the Municipality  

The main assets and potentials within the municipality include numerous waterfalls, forest reserves, streams, rivers and caves.

Sector

Assets

Potentials 

Constraints

Tourism Waterfalls  

-Tourist sites

-Generate  Hydro electricity-Inaccessible  road network

– Poorly constructed bridges

–  Landslides Caves-Tourist sites

-Inaccessible road network

– Poorly constructed bridges

–  Landslides

Forestry and wildlife

Rumpi  Hills-Monkeys, Alligators, porcupines 

-Medicinal plants, NTFPs

-Timber-Illegal exploitation of timber species

-Illegal poachingKorup Forest-Monkeys, Alligators, alligators, elephants, Medicinal plants, NTFPs

-Timber-Illegal exploitation of timber species

-Illegal poachingChristian Philanthropic forest-Monkeys, Alligators, alligators, elephants

– Medicinal plants, NTFPs

-Timber-Illegal exploitation of timber species

-Illegal poachingWater and EnergyStreams , Rivers, Springs-Sand extraction,

-Fresh Water Sources-Drought

-PollutionCommerceSG SOC-Plantation Agriculture

.Employment Opportunities-Landslides

-Village Land Disputes

Table 4: Assets, Potentials and Constraints of the Biophysical Environ


3.3.3.      Synthesis of Main Economic (Trade) Activities

 

Gender Main Economic Activity
Men
  • Farming of Cash Crops (cocoa)
  • Hunting
  • Fishing
Women ü  Farming of food crops (banana, cocoyam, plantains, vegetable and spices)ü  Trading (buyam sellam)ü  Restoration
Youth v  Farming (cash/food crops)v  Hunting/Trappingv  Fishing

Table 5: Synthesis of Main Economic Activities

Source: Village Study Aug./ Sept. 2011

 

3.3.4.      List of Main Institutions and problems encountered (Table 6):

No Name & Status of Groups Activity Problems encountered
01 Toko Development Women (registered CIG) Farming plantains & banana Limited Access to fertilizers, equipment and modern techniques
02 Chosobola Group (registered CIG) Animal rearing Limited Access to high breed and feed, equipment
03 Center for Rural Development Production (CEFAP)/ registered Crop production and marketing Limited Access to fertilizers, equipment and modern techniques
04 Rural Progressive (registered CIG) Rearing goats Limited Access to high breed and feed, equipment
05 Senase (registered CIG) Crop farming Limited Access to fertilizers, equipment and modern techniques
06 Se-keke Royal Progressive Group (registered) Rearing goats and fowls Limited Access to high breed and feed, equipment
07 MOBIA (registered CIG) Farming plantain and banana Limited Access to fertilizers, equipment and modern techniques
08 Ngekenesesopole (registered CIG) Mixed crop farming Limited Access to fertilizers, equipment and modern techniques
09 Dynamic Women of Toko Savings and Loans Scheme Not registered
10 Christian Women Fellowship Spiritual/ evangelization work Not registered
11 BAKE (registered CIG) Mixed crop farming Limited Access to fertilizers, equipment and modern techniques
12 IBOKO CIG (registered) Animal rearing Limited Access to high breed and feed, equipment
13 BASAMAI CIG (registered) Farming plantains and banana Limited Access to fertilizers, equipment and modern techniques

 

 


3.3.5. Synthesis of CID

3.3.5.1. SWOT Analysis of TOC

  Strengths Human Resources
  • Youthful and Committed Staff
General Administration v  Legal Entity with identified boundariesv  Regular Deliberations by at least 85% of Councilors
Financial Resources
  • Standard Operating Procedure for Revenue Collection
Assets
  • Available equipment such Tipper and 4×4 Hilux
  • Available Council Chambers
  • Available Council Real Estate
Relation with Partners v  Cordial Relationship with Supervisory Authority
Weaknesses Human Resources v  No Municipal Treasurerv  No clearly elaborated Job Descriptions for staffv  No system of staff evaluationv  No Gender Policyv  Absence of Staff Meetingsv  Under Staffed with limited knowledge on Council Management

v  Limited training opportunities for council staffs

v  Untrained Councilors

v  Non Functional Council Standing Committees

General Administration
  • Irregular Payment of staff salaries
  • Limited Delegation of Authority
  • Poor collaboration among council executive
  • General laxity at work (Deputies Mayors & SG are not always on seat)
  • Low rate of implementation of Municipal Decisions
  • Limited Flow of Information at all levels
  • Poor Filing System (No archives)
  • No Standard Operating Manuals and Procedures on Council Functioning
Financial Resources v  Poor Tax Basev  Limited Cooperation between the Council and the business communityv  Inadequate strategies for revenue collection
Assets
  • No Policy on the use of council assets
  • Obsolete office equipment
Relations with Partners v  Non collaboration with business community and other development actors within the municipalityv  No Open Day programs between the population and the council.v  No Policy for Public Private Partnerships within the municipality
Opportunities   v  Tropical Forests with potentials for Research, Conservation, by International and National partners (Korup National Park, Rumpi Forest, Christian Philanthropic Forest.
    v  Availability of tourist potentials e.g. waterfalls, caves, Eco Tourismv  Available Land for Agro Industrial Production (SG SOC) oil palm exploitationv  Available Funding partners e.g. FEICOM, PNDPv  Potentials for hire (payment) by the community.
Threats   v  Non resident heads of technical servicesv  Risky & undulating terrainv  Rural Exodus for the youthv  Poor Tax Base

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.3.5.2. Priority Areas for Reinforcement of TOC:

No. Main axes of reinforcement Activities for Reinforcement 
1 Human Resource capacities Train Staff & Councilors based on their training needs
Elaborate Job descriptions for each staff
Pay Staff outstanding salaries (unpaid since December 2010)
Develop Internal Rules and Regulations for staff
Solicit the services of a Municipal Treasurer
2 Financial Resource Mobilization Develop Financial Procedures on council revenue and expenditures
Identify & Sensitize all taxable resources  and activitiesDevelop Strategies for effective Collection of Global Tax.
3 Reinforce Collaboration with Council Stakeholders
  • Identify all Council Stakeholders
  • Organise Toko Development Forum
  • Stimulate Functioning of Water and Electricity Committees in Madie & Toko villages.
  • Elaborate Twinning opportunities for Toko Municipality
4 Management of Council Assets v  Render Market in Meangwe I to be functionalv  Develop Standard Operating Procedures for the use of the council 4×4 pick up vehicle and the Tipper.v  Acquire office equipment (data processing and furniture)v  Paint the Council Chambersv  Initiate Agro Business on 300 hectares of land
         

 

 

3.3.6. Land Use Map of TOC (Fig. 5):

 


 

3.3.7. Consolidated Problems and Needs per Sector

Sector

Core

Problem

Causes

Effects

Needs

Basic Education   Limited access to quality Basic Education
  • Insufficient qualified teaching staff
  • Insufficient classrooms
  • Insufficient  benches
  • Limited permanent classrooms
  • Limited access to didactic materials
  • No functional school libraries
  • No residence for staff
  • Insufficient latrines and water points in schools
  • High illiteracy rate
  • Juvenile delinquency
  • Rural Exodus
  • Poor Results at Public Examinations
  • High rate of school dropouts
  • Construct permanent structures and additional classrooms in schools
  • Recruit qualified teaching personnel
  • Supply didactic materials and other school needs
  • Construct water points, latrines, fences, libraries
  • Initiate contacts with NBDC
   
Secondary Education   Limited access to quality Secondary Education
  • Insufficient number of secondary schools
  • Insufficient qualified teaching staff
  • No play groups in schools
  • Limited classroom equipment and furniture
  • Limited access to didactic materials (students and teachers)
  • No functional school libraries
  • No latrines, fences and water points in schools
  • Low scolarisation rate
  • Poor performance of school
  • High rate of school drop outs
  • High rate of illiteracy
  • Juvenile delinquency
  • High rate of prostitution
  • Rural exodus
 
  • Construct additional classrooms in schools
  • Recruit qualified teaching personnel
  • Supply didactic materials and other school needs
  • Construct water points, latrines, fences, libraries
  • Create a high school within the council area
  • Initiate contacts with NBDC

 

Public Health  Limited access to quality health care services
  • Insufficient health equipment for consultations, pharmacy, laboratory
  • Insufficient qualified medical personnel
  • Insufficient and inadequate coverage of community outreach programs
  • Inadequate  health infrastructures
  • Long distance trek to existing  health units

 

  • High cost of health treatment
  • High prevalence of diseases
  • High infant mortality rate
  • High rate of rural exodus
  • Drop in per capital income
  • High cost of  expenditure
  • High death rate
  • Low standards of living
  • Recruit qualified medical personnel
  • Supply modern health equipment (beds, refrigerators, laboratory, drugs)
Water   Poor access to potable water
  • Insufficient potable water points
  • Inadequate alternative sources of potable water.
  • None functional pipe borne water supply
  • Long distance to fetch water in streams
  • Poorly treated available sources like the community wells
  • § High prevalence of water borne diseases
  • § High cost to treat related water borne diseases
  • § Drop in per capital income
  • § Low standards of living
  • § Construct more water schemes in more villages
  • § Rehabilitate existing water points In Madie and Toko
  • § Initiate contacts with OSRI
   
Energy  Poor access to electricity supply
  • None functional thermal electricity plants  in Toko and Madie Ngolo
  • No connection to the national electricity supply network (AES SONEL)
  • None functional maintenance committees for community generators
  • High cost to maintain  community generators
  • § Difficulty using electrical appliances
  • § High incidence in  health hazards like eye problems
  • § Difficulties for students  to study  at night
  • § High rate of insecurity
  • § Difficulty managing perishable foods
 
  • § Rehabilitate  electrification networks in in Toko and Madie Ngolo
  • Extension of AES SONEL  from Mundemba to Toko
Public Works   Poor state of rural road network
  • None maintenance of earth roads
  • Poor  state of culverts and bridges
  • Insufficient farm to market roads
  • Poor community mobilization
  • None existence of road maintenance committees
  • High cost of transportation
  • Limited circulation of persons, good and services
  • Rural exodus
  • Overloading of persons on clandestine vehicles
  • Drop in per capital income
  • Drop in living standards
  • High rate of accidents
  • Constant maintenance of existing road network
  • Construct bridges and culverts
  • Extend road network to other villages
  • Acquire front head loader
  • Rehabilitate council tipper
  • Initiate contacts with OSRI
   
Women Empowerment and  the Promotion of the Family   Marginalization of women and children
  • Absence of social structures
  • Insufficient and inadequate social facilities
  • Weak economic power of women
  • Insufficient and inadequate representation and participation of women in development and political issues
  • Ignorance of women on their rights
  • Under scholarisation of the girl child
  • Absence of  gender policy
  • Insufficient opportunities for the women and the girl child
  • High dependence rate of women
  • High prevalence  of early births for the girl child
  • High prevalence of abandoned children
  • High prevalence of early girl child marriages
  • Mobilize and sensitize on gender equality and related topics
  • Train administrative and council authorities on gender mainstreaming
  • Equip Home Economics Center in Toko.
  • Sensitize and train on women’s rights and the family
  • Train and support women on income generating activities
  • Initiate contacts with REACH OUT, Cameroon
   
Commerce  InsufficientBusiness and commercial activities
  • Insufficient market facilities
  • Poor information on prices of goods in other areas
  • Poor road network
  • Insufficient financial institutions
  • High price speculation on products
  • Insufficient revenue
  • Risk of diseases and loss of goods
  • Exploitation of the communities by traders (buyam-sellams)
  • Construct modern periodic market in Madie
  • Improve on Market in Toko Information Systems
  • Regularly maintain road network
  • Initiate contacts with SG SOC & KORUP
  • Activate Toko Village Bank
  • Lobby for Installation of Micro finance institution
   
Agriculture and Rural Development Low  agricultural production / productivity
  • § High cost of farm inputs
  • § Inadequate technical know how
  • § Pest and diseases attack on cocoa (black pod)
  • § Limited access to improved planting materials
  • Insufficient and inadequate transport facilities
  • § Limited access to agricultural equipment and inputs
  • § Insufficient training of farmers
  • § Low financial capacity on producers
  • § Insufficient technical personnel
  • § Limited access to training opportunities
  • § No storage facilities
  • § Drop in agricultural out put
  • § Low  revenue
  • § Poor living standards
  • § Low purchasing power
  • § Low harvest
  • § High post harvest losses
  • § Rural Exodus
 
  • § Organize trainings on modern production techniques and agricultural inputs utilization
  • § Provide modern farming equipment   to farmers
  • § Recruit trained agricultural personnel
  • § Provide modern storage facilities for perishable products
  • § Create and constantly maintain farm to market roads
  • § Network with KORUP Management Plan
  • § Network with SG SOC Management Plan
  • § Network with Christian Philanthropic Management Plan
Livestock, Fisheries and Animal Industries Low livestock and fisheries production/productivity
  • High cost of animal feed
  • Poor techniques of animal rearing (free range)
  • Inadequate technical know how.
  • Poor methods on animal rearing
  • Limited access to livestock technical services.
  • Fish Poisoning
  • § High rate of diseases outbreaks
  • § Limited Production of high  breed  animal species
  • § Low intake of protein
  • § Reduced revenue
  • § Low standards of living

 

  • Organize capacity building for animal breeders
  • Restructure  CIGs
  • Assist animal farmers with seed capital.
  • Initiate contacts with HPI
State Property and Land Tenure  High insecurity of state property and land
  • Limited number of title deeds for state and private property
  • Cultural limitations
  • Poor community sensitization on the importance of land titles and how to go about it
  • § Illegal possession of land
  • § Conflicts between individuals and  neighboring villages
  • § Create Sub delegation in the municipality
  • § Facilitate access to title deeds.
  • § Sensitize population on land issues.
   
Housing and Urban Development   Poor Town Planning
  • Construction of housing using local and temporal materials
  • Poor financial capacity of the population
  • Insecurity of occupied land
  •  Limited access to a communal electrification network
  • Absence of urban development and housing facilities
  • Absence of a Council Plan for villages
  • Absence of waste management plan
    • Haphazard building of houses
    • Poor construction of houses
    • Absence of vision and consciousness on construction of modern houses
    • High rate of water borne diseases
    • High rate of fire disasters
    • High rate of promiscuity
    • High rate of accidents
    • § Create and institute functional communal electricity and pipe borne water networks
    • § Elaborate Town plan
    • § Facilitate access to construction and building materials/equipment
   
Environment, Nature Protection and Sustainable Development High rate of Environmental degradation
  • High rate of water pollution
  • Poor management of natural resources
  • High rate of timber exploitation by illegal exploiters
  • Poor drainage system
  • § Displacement and extinction of animal  species
  • § High rate of erosion
  • § High incident of climate change
  • § Increase rate of pollution
    • Encourage tree planting
    • Sensitize on the impact on environmental issues
   
Forestry and Wildlife  High rate of forest exploitation
  • Illegal exploitation of the forests  for timber
  • Illegal hunting in the forest
  • Poor knowledge of forestry laws
  • Insufficient Forest controllers
  • Absence of a structure for the forestry post.
  • § Disappearance of certain species
  • § Destruction of biodiversity
  • § Climate change
  • Displacement of animal species
  • § Construct forestry post
  • § Increase number of technical staff in the forestry post
  • § Sensitize on the forestry laws
   
Territorial Administration and Decentralization  Insufficient local administrative services
  • Unavailable  personnel
  • Insufficient equipment
  • Limited collaboration with VTC
  • Slow classification of Chiefs
  • High  costs associated with administrative services
  • § High rate of rural exodus
  • § Drop in population
  • § Reduced trust of local administration
    • Transfer personnel and supply working equipment
    • Speed up process of classifying Chiefs
    • Develop confidence building measures and Sensitize population
   
Higher Education Inaccessibility to higher education
  • Absence of  professional education facilities
  • Insufficient  financial resources of parents

 

  • Difficult access to socio-professional training
  • High educational fees
  • Abandonment of studies
  • Juvenile delinquency
  • Under-development
  • Insufficient number of educated elites
  • § Offer scholarships to youths who have completed secondary education
 
Social Affairs   Insufficient social services and empowerment of vulnerable persons
  • Non existence of a data base of vulnerable persons
  • Absence of social centre and other infrastructure
  • None existence of social workers
  • Psychological trauma
  • Juvenile delinquency
  • Construct social centre
  • Recruit social workers to be at their disposal and to offer psycho-social assistance to them when need be
  • Establish lists of vulnerable.
  • Initiate contacts with REACHOUT
   
 Youth and Citizen Education  Insufficient youth empowerment facilities and programs
  • Insufficient trainers and youth animators
  • Limited entrepreneurial capacities
  • Limited access to funding youth interests
  • High illiteracy rate
  • Absence of youth empowerment structures and services
  • Limited mobilization of youths on income generating activities
  • § High rate of unemployment
  • § High illiteracy rate
  • § Juvenile  delinquency
  • § High rate of teenagers pregnancies
  • § High prevalence and spread of HIV and AIDS
  • § High rate of rural exodus
  • § Increase sensitization of youths on different opportunities available
  • § Create  functional youth empowerment centers
  • § Recruit youth trainers and animators
   
Sports and Physical Education  Insufficient  sporting activities
  • Insufficient sporting activities
  • Insufficient sport equipment in schools
  • Insufficient sport teachers in the different schools
  • § Low rate of physical exercise
  • § Poor development of sports and leisure disciplines
  • § Absence of sport organizations
  • § Insufficient  sport competitions
  • § Construct a sports complex
  • § Institute Proper management of the available sports facilities
  • § Employ sport teachers in schools
  • § Organize local  sporting activities
   
Transport Poor means of  transportation
  • Non existence of transport agencies in the municipality
  • Non existent transporters union
  • High cost of transport
  • Poor state of roads
  • Poor state of vehicles
  • Overloading of vehicles  and motor bikes
  • High rate of accidents
  • Inadequate circulation of persons and goods
  • Low economic activities
  • Drop in the labor force
  • High cost of transport
  • Rural exodus
  • Reorganize rural transportation network
   
Employment and Vocational Training  High rate of unemployment
  • Absence of a vocational training centre
  • Insufficient  employment opportunities
  • High illiteracy rate
  • Absence of professional training for potential job seekers
  • Absence of professional training schools
  • § High rate of illegal activities
  • § Juvenile delinquency
  • § High crime wave
  • § Construct SAR-SM and a professional training centre
  • § Support self employment through supply of seed capital
   
Small and Medium size Enterprises, Social Economy and Handicraft Insufficient actors in the informal sector  
  • Ignorance on procedures and formalities on enterprises creation
  • Limited opportunities for (mechanics, tailoring, panel beating/welding etc)
  • Weak vision and entrepreneurial capacity
  • Low capacity and skills of the population
  • Slow and weak promotion of the sector
  • High prices for basic services
  • High taxes for existing enterprises
  • Weak economic power of the population and the council
  • Insufficient revenue collection and diversification strategies
  • Create enabling environment to attract informal sector actors
  • Sensitize on small and medium size enterprises services
  • Support creation  of small and medium size enterprises and related services
   
Scientific Research and Innovation  Limited access to scientific innovations
  • Absence of research facilities (structures, personnel, equipment)
  • Poor dissemination of scientific innovations
  • Poor policy formulation and programming by the state with petroleum companies
  • Little or no information on agro pastoral innovations
  • Limited access to improved planting materials
  • Poor promotion of sectoral activities
  • Low quality of agricultural / Livestock products
  • Rudimentary production techniques
  • Poor production
  • Low revenues
  • High poverty rates
  • Train local community researchers
  • Institute Award of best innovative research projects
  • Carry out research on other  potentials
  • Initiate contacts with research departments of KORUP and PAMOL.
   
Tourism and Leisure  Poor development of touristic potentials
  • Absence of touristic infrastructures
  • Poor development of touristic sites
  • Enclave communities
  • Poor Road network
  • § Poor attraction of tourists
  • § Poor economic power of the population and the communities
  • § Limited benefits from Pro Poor Tourism activities
  • § Develop touristic sites
  • § Construct touristic infrastructures (hotels, restaurants and guest houses)
  • § Maintain road network
   
Arts and Culture    High rate of deterioration of cultural values
  • § Absence of  community halls
  • § Poor development and promotion of cultural initiatives
  • § Poor socio-cultural infrastructure
  • § Poor financial and organizational capacity
  • § Poor community  mobilization
  • § Non-binding decisions of ‘Palaver Houses’
  • § Loss of cultural values
  • § No cultural contribution in the economic growth of   communities
  • § Rural Exodus
 
  • § Construct community halls
  • § Organize cultural events
  • § Construct cultural Shrines

 

Industry, Mines and Technological Development Limited Development of the mining /  industrial sector
  • No feasibility studies carried out in this sector
  • Absence of trainings
  • Poor sensitization of the population
  • Absence of mining and industrial serctor policy

 

  • Poor conception of development plans
  • Over exploitation of resources
  • None financing of micro projects by companies
  • Weak economic power of the council and population
  • High rate of poverty in the communities
  • Conduct feasibility study on existing minerals within the municipality.
  • Organize a Toko Development Conference
 
Post and Telecommunications  Difficult access to information and postal services
  • Poor access to Radio,  TV and internet signals
  • Poor Mobile Telecommunication network
  • Absence of Community radio station

 

  • § Population is less informed
  • § Poor exposure to the outside world
  • § Difficulties in communicating with people within and out of the community
  • § High rate of unemployment
    • § Install radio and TV network antennas
    • § Establish Community radio
    • § Institute Mobile Telecommunication net works
 
Labour and Social Security  High rate of Job insecurity
  • Insufficient number of stabilized enterprises and organizations
  • Poor organization and structuring of self employment
  • High taxes
  • Poor sensitization
  • § Poor participation in development activities
  • § High rate of poverty
  • § High rate of rural exodus
    • § Attract enterprises in the municipality
    • § Sensitize on the rights of the employee
   
Public Security  High rate of insecurity
  • No resident public security staff
  • No permanent security offices
  • Refusal of transferred staff to reside in the municipality
  • High rates of unprosecuted domestic disputes
  •   High crime wave
  •  Create public security post
  • Transfer security staff
  • Construct houses for security staff
   
Communication  Poor communication networks
  • Poor access to Cameroon TV and Radio signals
  • Poor lobbying capacity
  • No community radio
  • Poor initiation of community radio project
  • Poor circulation of newspapers
  • No newspaper agents
  • Poor circulation of information
  • Limited access to development programs
  • Limited access to world events
  • Install CRTV antenna
  • Create community radio
  • Install news paper vendors
   

 

 

 

 

 

 


4.0.         CONCLUSION:

 

The Consolidated Diagnosis phase for elaborating the Communal Development Plan of Toko can best be assessed through a bird’s eye review of the processes involved, the timing, the interaction of the partners and the expected outputs.

The process constituted three principal stages including the preparatory stage (training, planning and sensitization meetings and the holding of the official launching workshop of stakeholders), the information collection and analysis stage which involved working with internal as well as external stakeholders of the council and the inhabitants of two urban centres (Madie I and Toko). Information was also collected sector by sector in all forty nine villages using a variety of tools. Attendance sheets were completed by participants after each meeting. The third stage in the process was the consolidation of information into excels sheets which also permitted the production of graphs, charts and tables.

 

The timing for the execution of this phase of the work (August, September, October and November 2011) was challenging as resource persons had to perform their tasks during heavy rainfall with over flooded rivers which are located within the municipality.

The key partners who facilitated this exercise included the council, the LSO and the PNDP who collaborated effectively to achieve the required result.

 

Along side the consolidated diagnosis, two other expected outputs were realized. These include the Council Institutional Diagnosis (CID) which summarizes the prevailing situation (SWOT) of the council and proposes priority actions for reinforcement. The second output is the Urban Space Diagnosis (USD) conducted in two major villages which have some basic infrastructure to be delimited as urban centres. These include Toko which is the seat of the local administration and Madie I which has a vibrant population that enjoys a few basic social services.

 

The problem and objective trees, log frames and activities with their related costs were validated by an enlarged council session. The consolidated diagnosis enabled the production of a draft strategic plan which was used during the planning, resource mobilization and programming workshop.

 

 

 

ANNEXES:

SUMMARY RESULTS OF PARTICIPATORY VILLAGE DIAGNOSIS PER SECTOR

 

Basic Education

Toko municipality has a total of twenty one (21) Government Primary Schools and two (2) Nursery Schools distributed in twenty one villages within the municipality.  There is no lay private institution within this sector in the council area. None of the schools has access to neither a water point nor a fence. Four (4) schools (19%) have a pit latrine. Forty nine percent (49%) of the pupil population are girls while fifty one percent (51%) are boys. The table below shows the situation of pupils and teachers within the municipality.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                          Fig 6: Enrolment in Basic Education.

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

Fig: 7 Teachers Situation in Basic education (There are 86 teachers within the sector)

 

 

Table 7:   Analysis of Primary and Nursery schools within Toko municipality

  School Total Enrolment Classrooms Effective number of teachers Number of desks Classroom/ Pupil ratio Teacher/Pupil ratio Desk/ Pupil ratio Number of schools having water points Number of schools having toilets Number of schools fenced
No. Type   Boys Girls Total Permanent Semi permanent Temporal
1 GS Madie New Town

68

58

126

2

2

0

3

56

1 :32

1 :42

1 :3

N

N

N

2 GS Madie I

46

42

88

2

2

0

7

80

1 :44

1 :13

1 :1

N

Y

N

3 GS Madie III Boembe

25

20

45

0

0

5

8

70

1 :9

1 :6

1 :1

N

N

N

4 GS Banyo

22

12

34

0

0

5

3

10

1 :7

1 :11

1 :4

N

N

N

5 GS Mofako Batanga

56

67

123

0

6

0

3

30

1 :21

1 :41

1 :4

N

Y

N

6 GS Bweme

59

45

104

4

0

5

3

55

1 :12

1 :35

1 :2

N

N

N

7 GS Kilekile

17

17

34

0

0

2

2

10

1 :2

1 :17

1 :4

N

N

N

8 GS Ikoi

71

63

134

2

0

2

2

41

1 :34

1 :67

1 :3

N

N

N

9 GS Dikome

47

42

89

2

3

0

4

32

1 :18

1 :23

1 :3

N

N

N

10 GS Moboka

32

28

60

0

0

2

3

10

1 :30

1 :20

1 :6

N

N

N

11 GS Meangwe I

40

50

90

0

3

0

5

60

1 :30

1 :18

1 :2

N

Y

N

12 GS Toko

46

53

99

2

0

0

8

60

1 :50

1 : 13

1 : 2

N

N

N

13 *GNS Toko

8

7

15

0

0

2

2

7

1 :8

1 :8

1 :2

N

N

N

14 GS Betika

20

13

33

0

0

2

3

10

1 :17

1 :11

1 :4

N

N

N

15 GS Dibonda

44

47

91

2

0

2

3

50

1 :23

1 :30

1 :2

N

N

N

16 GS Bombangi

35

41

76

0

5

0

3

100

1 :15

1 :25

1 :1

N

N

N

17 GS Lipenja

52

51

103

2

0

4

10

40

1 :17

1 :10

1 :3

N

Y

N

18 *GNS Lipenja

5

5

10

0

0

2

2

7

1 :5

1 :5

1 :1

N

N

N

19 GS Ikenge

   50

59

109

0

0

5

6

25

1 :22

1 :19

1 :5

N

N

N

20 GS Esukotan

29

26

55

0

4

1

7

20

1 :5

1 :8

1 :3

N

N

N

21 GS Nwamoki

10

7

17

0

0

1

1

0

1 :17

1 :17

1 :17

N

N

N

22 GS Itali

17

13

30

0

0

1

1

0

1 :30

1 :30

1 :30

N

N

N

23 GS Ndoi

13

8

21

0

0

1

1

0

1 :21

1 :21

1 :21

N

N

N

Source:  Field Survey Aug. – Sept. 2011                                                   * indicates Nursery Schools

From the analysis of the teachers’ situation for basic education within the municipality, there are eighty six (86) teachers of whom 39% are contract teachers, 30% civil servants and 31% are PTA teachers.

 

Table 8: List of Nursery and Primary Schools Needs

School

Needs

Classroom (Number needed) Pupils’ Desk (Number needed) Tables (number needed) Teachers’ Chairs (number needed) Water point (Y/N) Toilet (Y/N) Fence (Y/N) Teachers

Nursery schools

 

GNS Toko

1

1

1

2

Y

Y

Y

0

GNS Lipenja

1

0

1

2

Y

Y

Y

0

Primary Schools
GS Madie N.T

4

7

6

12

Y

Y

Y

4

GS Madie Ngolo

4

0

6

               12

Y

N

Y

3

GS Boembe Madie III

6

0

6

12

Y

Y

Y

4

GS Banyo

6

7

6

12

Y

Y

Y

3

GS Mofako Batanga

6

32

6

12

Y

N

Y

4

GS Bweme

2

0

6

12

Y

Y

N

3

GS Kilekile

6

7

6

12

Y

Y

Y

4

GS Ikoi Ngolo

4

26

6

12

Y

Y

Y

4

GS Dikome N

4

13

6

12

Y

Y

Y

2

GS Moboka

6

20

6

12

Y

Y

Y

4

GS Meangwe I

6

0

6

12

Y

N

Y

2

GS Toko

4

0

6

12

Y

Y

Y

0

GS Betika

6

36

6

12

Y

Y

Y

3

GS Dibonda

4

0

6

12

Y

Y

N

3

GS Bombangi

6

0

6

12

Y

Y

Y

3

GS Lipenja

6

12

6

12

Y

N

Y

0

GS Ikenge

6

30

6

12

Y

Y

Y

0

GS Esukotan

6

8

6

12

Y

Y

Y

0

GS Nwamoki

6

10

2

2

Y

Y

Y

6

GS Itali

6

10

2

2

Y

Y

Y

6

GS Ndoi

6

10

2

2

Y

Y

Y

6

Total Needs

112

223

116

226

23

19

23

64

Source:  Field Survey Aug. – Sept. 2011.

 

 

 

A needs analysis reveal that 112 additional classrooms, 223 benches and 64 teachers should be put in place to meet the required standards within the basic education sector.

A majority of the schools have semi permanent and temporal structures with very few permanent buildings. Hence, there is need for quality classrooms by renovating existing dilapidated structures while planning for the construction of permanent ones.

 

Secondary Education

There are two secondary schools located in Toko and Madie with one technical school is located in Lipenja. All are public schools.  The total number of students is 315 of which I68 are boys (49%) and 162 girls (51%).Fig 6 &7 below shows enrolment and teachers situation in these schools.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                            Fig 8: Enrolment in Secondary Education                                    Fig 9: Teachers situation in Secondary Education

 

 

School Total Enrolment Classrooms Effective number of teachers Number of desks Classroom/ Pupil ratio Teacher/ Pupil ratio Desk/ Pupil ratio Schools having water points Schools having toilets Schools fenced
Type Boys Girls Total Permanent Semi permanent Temporal Y/N Y/N Y/N
       
GSS Madie Ngolo

59

84

143

1

4

0

5

25

1 :29

1 :29

1 :8

N

Y

N

GSS Toko

77

73

150

1

4

0

5

15

1 :30

1 :30

1 :10

N

Y

N

GTC Lipenja

17

5

22

1

2

0

3

7

1 :7

1 :7

1 :3

N

N

N

Table 9: Enrolment in Secondary Schools

From the analysis in fig 7 above shows that there are thirteen (13) teachers of whom 69% are contract, 23% PTA and 8% Civil servants.

 

Table 10: List of Secondary School Needs

School

Needs

Classroom and workshops Desks Teachers’ Tables (No. needed) Teachers’ Chairs Water point Toilet Fence Teachers
(No. needed) (No. needed) (No. needed) (Y/N) (Y/N) (Y/N)
GSS Madie Ngolo

3

47

5

10

Y

N

Y

5

GSS Toko

3

60

5

10

Y

N

Y

5

GTC Lipenja

1

4

3

6

Y

Y

Y

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

From the findings, all the schools do not have have access to basic social facilities such as water points and fences. However, GSS Toko and Madie have pit latrines.  There is the need to construct a toilet in GTC Lipenja and a water point in each of the schools. It was also discovered that all the schools have limited permanent structures to accommodate a convenient learning environment hence there is urgent need for the construction of classrooms.

 

 

            Fig 10: Need of benches in Secondary Education


 

Public Health

Toko municipality has four (4) health centres (3 Government and 1 Private of the Presbyterian Church in Cameroon). The government health centres are highly understaffed with non existent health services such as consultations and drug administration especially in Toko; despite the permanent structures that have been constructed. All minor medical problems are handled by the Presbyterian health center in Madie, Lipenja and Dikome while serious cases are transported to Mundemba, Ekondo Titi and Kumba hospitals. The poor road network contributes to the death of several patients before they reach nearby hospitals.

From available records at the Presbyterian health unit, less than 5% of the population do their HIV and AIDs status tests. Only pregnant women are tested during maternal check up in order to know their status to prevent transmission from mother to child during delivery.

The table below gives the situation of the health institutions within the municipality.

 

 

 

Table 11: Consolidation of data on health

Village

Population

Realisation

General information of centre

Personnel

Infrastructure

Equipments

Furnishing

 Health data

Centre Mgt

Enterprise

Source of finance

Year of constuction

Health area

health district

Status of the centre

Year of creation

Doctor

SRN

Asst. Nurse

Nurse aid

Ward servant

others

No. of buildings

State

Bed

Lab.

Maternity

Pharmacy

Refrigerator

Water point

Latrine

Reaforestation

Fence

Waste disposal system

Doctor’s residence

Level of sanitary cover

Level of visit

Average No. of births

Level of Vacccination cover

Epidemic

Existence of mgt committee

existence of health committee

         

(i)

             

Good

Avge

Bad

 

(Y/N)

(Y/N)

(Y/N)

 

(Y/N)

(Y/N)

(Y/N)

(Y/N)

(ii)

(Y/N)

%

%

%

%

 

(Y/N)

(Y/N)

Madie 1 Ngolo

700

PCC

PCC

1972

Toko

Mundemba

Private

1984

0

1

1

1

0

0

1

 

Y

 

12

Y

Y

Y

2

 Y

Y

N

N

N

N

 60

 80

 60

80

N

N

N

Lipenja

500

GOC

GOC

1983

Toko

Mundemba

Public

1983

0

2

1

0

0

0

1

   

Y

10

N

Y

Y

1

N

Y

N

N

N

N

40

60

50

80

N

Y

Y

Dikome Ngolo

297

GOC

GOC

1996

Toko

Mundemba

Public

1996

0

1

1

0

0

0

1

 

Y

 

10

N

Y

N

1

N

Y

N

N

N

N

60

35

40

80

N

Y

Y

Toko

 811

GOC

GOC

2010

Toko

Mundemba

Public

2010

0

1

0

0

0

0

1

 Y

   

10

N

Y

N

1

Y

Y

N

N

N

Y

80

0

0

80

N

N

N

Total

1511

             

0

5

3

1

0

0

4

     

42

     

5

                         

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fig 11: Situation of Health Personnel

The analysis above indicates that out of the three staffs in Madie, one is a SRN while one is an assistant nurse and the other is a nurse aid.  Toko on the other hand has only one staff and he is a SRN. Lipenja has two SRN and one assistant nurse while Dikome on the other hand has one SRN and one assistant nurse. There is no medical doctor in the municipality.   With an estimated population of 13, 318 inhabitants there is need to recruit more personnel that would offer basic health services (laboratory, maternity, pharmacy) in the council area. Another needed priority action is the constitution of functional health committees.

 

Environment and Nature Protection

There are natural sites with ecological importance, like forests, carves and waterfalls. These natural sites provide basic habitat for the numerous wildlife that are found within the municipality.

In recent years, the natural environment has witnessed a deterioration of existing ecosystems, loss of bio-diversity and decrease in soil fertility as a result of indiscriminate clearance of forests in favour of farmlands, poor farming practices, unsustainable felling of trees for fuel and construction. Furthermore, there are several landslides especially during the rainy season which also contributes to environmental degradation.

 

 

 

            Water Resources

Water supply in the area is mainly through community water schemes. There are pipe borne water schemes in four villages within the municipality. The tables below show the distribution of water resources in the Municipality.

Table 12: Diagnosis of Water Situation in the Municipality

Village Population (a) Work type Realization Structure Characteristics Functionality
Scan water Portable water supply CDE Enterprise Source of financing Fixed date Water capturing Number of water towers Number of bore holes Number of public taps Number of connections Capacity Drive lengths Functional Adduction Water tower / Functional capturing Number of non fuctional bore holes Number of non functional public taps Management
            (i)         in litre (in m) (O/N)       (ii)
Toko 811 N Y N Helvetas/ GTZ Helvetas/ GTZ 2010   0 1 7 0     N 0 0 6 N
Madie New Town 365 N Y N Helvetas/ GTZ Helvetas/ GTZ 1989   0 0 2 0     N 0 0 0 N
Madie Ngolo   700  N  Y  N Helvetas/ GTZ  Helvetas/ GTZ  1997    0  0  8  0      N  0  0  1  N
Meangwe 1 600 N Y N Helvetas/ GTZ Helvetas/ GTZ 2010   0 0 2 0 0   N 0 0 2 N

                                                                                                                                                  

 

 

Table 13: Diagnosis on Bore Hole

Village Population (a) REALISATION STRUCTURE CHARACTERISTICS State of work MAINTENANCE QUANTITY AND QUALITY OF WATER
Enterprise Source of financing Starting date Anti mire Area Cleanliness Bore hole diameter Bore hole depth Water height Pompe type Mark Functioning Cause of breakdown Exploitation of work The existence of a management committee CG Functioning Sufficient quantity Water quality Water borne diseases
      (O/N) (O/N) (m) (m) (m) (i)   (O/N) (O/N) (ii) (iii) (O/N) (O/N) (O/N) (iv) (O/N)
Toko  811  GOC  GOC  2010  Y Y m m m  –  – Y N Y Y Good N

 

          Energy Resources

There are two communities with thermal generators and none is functional. The Municipality has a good number of waterfalls that can be used to generate electricity. The communities within the municipality do not have the financial capacity to purchase thermal generators and poor management of existing generators makes smooth and daily running difficult.  100% of the inhabitants within the municipality use the local bush lamp for lighting of their homes. Kerosene for bush lamps is purchased from Mundemba and is relatively scarce during the rainy season.

The table below shows the distribution of thermal energy.

 

 

 

 

 

Table 14: Diagnosis of Electricity   

Village Population REALISATION STRUCTURAL CHARACTERISTICS FUNCTIONALITY  GEOGRAPHIC CONTACTS OF THE STRUCTURES
Enterprise Source of finance Date of start of operation Nature Neighbourhood  served No. of transformers No. of installed poles Average  tension length Low tension length No. of connections Functionality of the network No. of non functional transformers No. of non functional poles (bad or fallen) Existence of a  group of technicians (committee for the extension of connection) Existence of management committee Generator Transformer 1
      (i)  Y/N     (in km) (in Km)   (Y/N)       (ii) X Y Z X Y Z
Toko

811

PIB

Gov’t

2004

Bad

Y

0

12

0

0

5

N

0

1

N

N

5.0404

9.1337

895m

N/A

N/A

N/A

Meangwe 1

600

PIB

GOC

2004

Bad

Y

0

5

0

0

3

N

0

0

N

N

5.0404

9.1337

895m

N/A

N/A

N/A

Madie Ngolo

700

TOC

TOC

2010

Bad

 N

0

0

0

0

 0

N

0

0

N

N

5.0127

9.2139

917m

N/A

N/A

N/A

v  Toko & Meangwe I share the same generator.

v  Electricity supply in Madie Ngolo uses non stahdard poles (from Indian Bamboo).

v  There is need to extend the electricity network from Mundemba to Toko in order to increase on economic activities of the area and reduce rural exodus of inhabitants especially the youth.

 

 

Forestry and Wildlife

Toko municipality is located within the dense equatorial forest of the Congo Basin. It has three distinct vegetation types consisting of the wet and dry equatorial rain forests.

There is high rate of illegal exploitation of timber resources especially by known licensed exploiters for fuel and the construction of houses. The commonly exploited species in the council area includes; black and white afara, iroko, mahogany, small leaf and bobinga. Exploitation of NTFPs (Non Timber Forest Products) is a common practice among women in the area whose harvests include: njangsa, bush pepper, bitter cola, bush onion, eru and some medicinal species.

There are three forest reserves within the municipality which protect an extensive area (about 60% of total land space) of habitat for wildlife. These include the Rumpi Hills, Korup National Park and the Christian Philanthropic Community Forest Reserve. As a result of high rate of deforestation of the non protected land, vegetation cover has greatly suffered. Trapping and hunting has also reduced the quantity and specie type of wildlife within the municipality. Some of the animal species includes; elephants, bush pigs, red tail monkeys, alligators, antelopes, cane rat and crocodiles. Other species such as porcupine, pangolin, pythons, alligator, deer, monkey, and squirrel are mostly hunted in the secondary forests and farmlands by local hunters who usually set locally designed traps.

 

      Table 15:  Forest reserve in the council area

No. Forest Reserve Number of Hectares
1 Korup National Park 49.105
2 Rumpi Hills 5.445
3 Christian Philanthropic Community Forest 4.928

         Source: MINFOF Buea (Sept. 2011)

 

 

 

                                         Fig 12: Distribution of Forest Reserves

 

Financial Institutions

There is only one financial institution within the municipality which is called the Village Bank that was implanted with assistance from the Rumpi Area Participatory Development Project. Since it was handed over to a local management committee it has seldom offered any banking services to its members and the entire Toko population.

 

A majority of the population, especially women are members of local njangi groups which are generally constituted on tribal lines or professional interests. These njangi houses are active in savings and loans and other self help activities. The absence of formal financial institutions within the municipality has adverse effects on the potentials for vibrant business climate as well as on the tax base of the council.

 

Territorial Administration and Decentralization

There is a Divisional Officer who coordinates and ensures the smooth functioning of technical services within the municipality. He is assisted by an assistant. Together they work with village heads to among others settle all sorts of disputes.

There is a Gendarmerie Brigade in Toko headed by a Brigade Commander who ensures law and order as well support the council during tax recovery missions. Like several services which are effectively present within the municipality, they are under staffed and have no equipment to facilitate their smooth functioning.

There no Police Post within the municipality.

 

Housing and Urban Development

All the houses constructed within the municipality are of plank with zinc roofs (semi permanent infrastructure where some are in good state while others are in bad state) and have no building permits. Toko council does not have a town planning service or a master plan for any of its villages.

Land Use: Land in the municipality is used for perennial and annual crop production; settlements, access roads, play grounds, market areas, and construction of government and private services and religious structures.

Land Tenure System:  Land within the municipality is acquired mainly through inheritance but can be purchased from another family. Traditional Councils working with the Chief can also apportion land for development purposes. Women do not inherit land but can purchase and own land.

Tourism and Leisure

The tourist industry is not developed in Toko municipality. However, many tourist potentials exist that can be exploited. The rich culture of the people exhibited in traditional dances during festivals and national celebrations can attract tourists. In addition, the beautiful and exquisite topography, the Rumpi Hills, Korup National Park and numerous waterfalls and carves can boost the local economy of the council if properly exploited. The road network to Toko however presents numerous challenges to this sector.

 

Arts and Culture

Toko municipality has three major tribes all of whom belong to the main Orocko people who are descendants of Ngoe. These tribes which include the Ngolos, Batangas and Bakokos speak similar languages, dancing and also inter marry. Their shared cultural values are further portrayed through their beliefs, music, dressing, housing and food. This sector can be of great importance to the people if a cultural plan is elaborated.

 

Transport

The transport system in the Toko municipality is tremendously underdeveloped. Only four wheel drive vehicles ply the main access road that links Toko to Mundemba. Motor bikes are a surer means of transport in that they can create tracks within the road. Trekking accounts for more than 90% of inter village movement thus making movement within the municipality very difficult and expensive. The topography and the bad nature of the roads especially during the raining seasons make moving a nightmare.

 

Public Works

 

Road network in Toko Municipality

 

Earth roads linking Mundemba and Toko with a side road to Lipenja are not regularly maintained thus rendering them impassable especially during the rainy season.  The council equally does not have road maintenance equipment. Problems identified by the community include poor drainage systems, poor road maintenance, poor construction of culverts and bridges.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Higher Education

Toko municipality has no institution for higher education beyond the secondary level. Students who complete secondary education move to Mundemba or beyond to obtain higher education or vocational and professional training.

 

Agriculture and Rural Development

Agriculture represents the back bone of the local economy employing about 95% of inhabitants within the municipality. The highly fertile loam soils and favorable climatic conditions have favored a cultivation of a variety of both food and cash crops in the municipality such as cocoa, oil palm, cassava, plantains, banana, pepper, maize, egusi cocoyam and vegetables. Despite the fertile soils, yields are still very low due to the poor methods of farming, high cost of inputs such as fertilizers, difficult access to improved planting materials, pests and disease attacks on cocoa and cocoyam. Farmers in this sector also suffer from unscrupulous License Buying Agents (LBAs) who exploit the usually helpless nature of the inhabitants of the council area.

Livestock, fisheries and animal industries 

Animal species which are domesticated includes pigs, sheep, goats and fowls. These animals roam freely within villages and are usually caught when ready for use during ceremonies and for periodic home consumption.

There are several challenges within this sector including; absence of veterinary personnel, facilities and services which gives room for bacterial diseases such as swine erysipelas in pigs and cocsidiasis in poultry.

Limited fishing activities for household consumption are carried out in the streams and rivers.

Women Empowerment and the Promotion of the Family 

There is no existing structure that particularly caters for the interests of women of the girl child. A Home Economic Centre (CEAC) has been recently approved to be based in Toko and two sewing machines and some buckets have arrived Toko but there are no staffs or a convenient structure to host the centre..

There is need to send staff and related equipment in order to render the center functional.

Youth and Citizen Education

The delegation of youth affairs is not represented within the municipality; hence youths of the council area do not have access to youth programs which are offered by the Ministry of Youth Affairs. Also, the council has no specific programs for the youths.

 

Sports and Physical Education

There are no sporting activities organized beyond inter school sports. The council does not organize activities that specifically benefits the youth within this sector.

 

Employment and Vocational Training

There is need for a vocational training centre in the Municipality.  Most of the youths go out of the council area (Buea and Mundemba) in order to acquire professional training.

 

 

 

Small and Medium-size Enterprises, Social Economy and Handicrafts

The municipality has very few business activities such as provision stores and road side markets. However, an American Company called SG SOC has recently taken shop and opened palms nursery in Lipenja which is sure to create the first enterprise within the municipality. SG SOC will certainly create employment for Toko children as well as provide income for the council through payment of taxes.

 

Social Affairs

There is no infrastructure in this sector despite the presence of vulnerable persons in the council area. Most of the vulnerable persons are handicapped (unable to walk) and have never received any support neither from the council nor the delegation of social affairs in Mundemba. The problems identified include limited access to social services and limited knowledge on available social services and benefits.

 

Scientific Research and Innovation

The delegation is not represented in the division thus the rich variety in tree types with potentials medicinal values in the municipality are catered for by the conservation institutions. The local population also extracts and treats medicinal plants (kanda stick) for health issues. There is need to improve on this sector.

 

Industry, Mines and Technological Development  

This sector is not represented in the council area. There is no mining or industry that is located in the area.

 

Posts and Telecommunications

There are neither radio nor television signals within the municipality.  The municipality is in desperate situation as far as this sector is concerned. There are no CAMTEL, MTN and Orange mobile telephone networks hence communication is extremely difficult. There are equally no postal services within the municipality.

 

Labour and Social Security

The only employment opportunities within the municipality are from the government through schools and the health institutions including that of the PCC. There is no delegation of Labour and social Security in the municipality.

There is high rate of unemployment leading to increase rural exodus.

State Property and Land Tenure

The municipality has several government buildings harboring government technical services, schools, health center and other social facilities. However some of these buildings are dilapidated and need renovation.

A majority of the population do not possess land certificates resulting to several cases of land disputes.  Most houses do not have building permits and the council has no resident town planner.

 

 

Commerce

There is one market within the municipality located in Toko which was constructed with financial support from the Rumpi Project. Since its construction in 2008, it has seldom functioned because buyers cannot come to Toko due to the very poor state of roads. The market has under utilized permanent structures where a few women gather every Tuesday in wait for buyers.   Other commercial activities in the council area include very few beer parlour, eating houses, and petty trading stores. Below is the diagnosis of the market situation.

 

 

 

 

Table 16: Diagnosis of Market Infrastructures

Village Type of infrastructure Realisation Characterictic of Project

Equipement existant

Facilities Management
Shop Market/commercial complex Bus station Livestock farm Slaughter house Nursery Others Enterprise Source of finance Year of construction Capacity Nature Market days Present state Counter Shop Shed Butcher’s shop Fish store Cold store Others Water point Latrine Waste treatment system Reaforestation Electricity Speed ramps for handicaps Office Others Management method Existing management committee Monthly income
                     

(i)

(ii)

(iii)

              (Y/N) (Y/N) (Y/N) (Y/N) (Y/N) (Y/N) (Y/N) (Y/N) (iv) (Y/N  
Toko

N

Y

N

N

N

N

 

Rumpi

Rumpi

2008

100

periodic

Tuesdyas

Good

 12 0 52 N N N   N N N N N N N N Direct N  


PROBLEM ANALYSIS: WOMEN EMPOWERMENT AND THE PROMOTION OF THE FAMILY

 

 

High dependence rate of women

High rate of poverty among women

Violence against women

Unfavorable decision taken for women

High prevalence of early birth for the girl child

Marginalization of women and children

Weak economic power of women

Inadequate representation and participation of women in development and political issues

Ignorance of women on their rights

Low level of education of women

Few women entrepreneurs

Male domination

Women are not educated on their rights

Under scholarisation of the girl child

V

 

LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: WOMEN EMPOWERMENT AND THE PROMOTION OF THE FAMILY

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Decision making by women improved At least 50% of women take decisions on matters that concern them by 2020. – Testimonies- Administrative reports Negative cultural practices against women reduced.
Specific objective Marginalization of women and children reduced By 2015 at least 50% of women are empowered personally, economically, socially, culturally and politically. – Administrative reports-  Testimonies Male subordination reduced
Results 1. Economic power of women increased At least 40% of women embark on profitable income generating activities by 2015. – Business records- Administrative reports Favourable economic conditions
2. Representation and participation of women in development and political issues increased. By 2015, at least 50% of members in development and political committees are women –  Administrative reports-Testimonies – Negative socio-cultural biases.-  Inferiority complex of women reduced.
3. Ignorance of women on their rights reduced By 2015, at least 50% of the women in the municipalities know their rights and apply them – Testimonies-  Reports Male subordination reduced
  4. Level of education for women increased At least 20% of young girls enroll in schools at all levels yearly. School enrollment registers Negative cultural practices reduced
Activities Quantity Place

Cost (cfa)

R1. Economic power of women increased      
1.1 Train women on various income generating activities 49 trainings All the villages 5,000,000
1.2 Support women with capital to start income generating activities 2000 women Selected from all the villages 100,000,000
R2 Representation and participation of women in development and political issues increased      
2.1 Sensitize women on the importance of their participation in development issues 49 All villages 2,500,000
2.2 Institute a quota system in membership of development and political committees 49 All villages 1,500,000
R3 Ignorance of women on their right reduced      
3.1 Sensitize women on their rights 49 All villages 2,500,000
R4 Level of education of women increased      
4.1 Sensitize the population on the importance of the education of the girl child 49 All villages 2,500,000
4.2 Award scholarship to girls at all level of education 200 All villages 10,000,000
Total     124.000.000
               

 

 

 

PROBLEM ANALYSIS: PUBLIC WORKS

 

Limited circulation of persons and goods

High cost of transportation

Overloading of persons and clandestine vehicles

Poor transportation of agricultural products

High rate of accident

High cost of transportation

Insufficient farm to market roads

Poor conditions of existing roads

Poor state of culverts and bridges

Poor maintenance of culverts and bridges

No maintenance committees

Poor community mobilization

Insufficient funds

Poor maintenance of existing roads

Poor community mobilization

No maintenance committee


 

LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: PUBLIC WORKS

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Circulation of goods and persons increased By 2020 transport means increase in the municipality yearly by at least 15% –          Traffic counts-          Testimonies Stable economic  environment
Specific objective Rural roads network improved By 2020, at least 30% of the communities  are accessible all seasons –          Transport records-          Testimonies-          Visits –          Community collaboration-          Stable economic environment
Results 1. Farm to market roads increased By 2020, at least 40km of roads constructed, regularly maintained and accessible all seasons. –          Administrative reports-          Visits –          Community collaboration-          Stable economic environment
2. Conditions of existing roads improved At least 30km of existing roads are regularly maintained and accessible all seasons by 2015 –          Visits-          Administrative reports Community collaboration
3. State of culverts and bridges improved 25%  of broken down culvers and bridges are rehabilitated and used by 2015 –          Visits-          Testimonies Community collaboration
Activities Quantity Place

Cost (cfa)

R1. Farm to market roads increased      
1.1 Conduct studies 2 2 villages 2,000.000
1.2 Construct new roads 40 km 2 villages 2.800,000.000
1.3 Maintain new roads 40 km 2 villages 40,000.000
R2. Conditions of existing roads improved      
2.1 Conduct studies 2 studies 2 villages 2,000,000
2.2 Rehabilitate roads 40 km 2 villages 300,000,000
2.3 Maintain roads 30 km 2 villages 40,000,000
R3. State of culvert and bridges improved      
3.1 Conduct studies 2 2 villages 5.000.000
3.2 Rehabilitate culverts and bridges 46 2 villages 30.000.000
Total     3.219.000.000
               

 

PROBLEM ANALYSIS: ENERGY RESOURCES

 

High rate of insecurity

Poor lighting of the municipality

Poor storage of perishable foods

Inadequate economic activities

Insufficient reading by students at night

Poor access to electricity supply

Non functional thermal electricity plants in Toko and Madie Ngolo

Poor maintenance of thermal electricity plants

No connection to the national electricity supply network (AES SONEL)

Non functional community generators

Installation of community generators

Poor lobbying

 

LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: ENERGY RESOURCES

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Lighting of communities improved By 2020, at least 30% of communities in the municipality are regularly supplied with electricity –          Public interviews-          Administrative reports-          Observations Favorable economic and political environment
Specific objective Access to electricity supply increased At least 20% of the population use electricity for lighting of their houses and businesses by 2015 –          Business records-          Interviews Favorable economic and political environment
Results 1. Thermal electricity plants in Toko and Madie Ngolo made functional By 2015, two thermal electricity plants in Toko and Madie Ngolo are maintained regularly, and supply electricity throughout. –          Observations-          Testimonies-          Administrative reports Stable economic environment
2.   Community generators increased and functional At least 20 community generators installed and functional by 2015. –          Testimonies-          Observations Community collaboration
3. Connection to the national electricity supply network (AES SONEL) enhanced By 2015, Toko town has functional AES SONEL installations –          Administrative report-          Public interviews Stable political environment
Activities Quantity Place

Cost (cfa)

R1 Thermal electricity plants in Toko and Madie Ngolo made functional.      
1.1 Rehabilitate thermal electricity plants 2 Toko and Madie Ngolo 2,000,000
1.2 Maintain thermal electricity plants 2 Took and Madie Ngolo 2,000,000
R2 Community generators increased and functional      
2.1 Install community generators 20 Bweme, Mobenge, Bekita, Bokuba, Iboka, Meangwe I, Ngamoki I, Mapanja, Mofako, Drenge, Dipundu, Tombe, Banyo, Ndio, Debonda Koroki, Masaka, Bombangi, Lipenja, Kilekile, Meyeka 200,000,000
2.2 Maintain community generators 20 20,000,000
R3 Connections to the national electricity supply network supply (AES SONEL) enhanced      
3.1 Lobby for the installation of AES SONEL 1 Toko 1,000,000
Total     225.000.000
               

 

 

PROBLEM ANALYSIS:   WATER RESOURCES

 

High cost to treat related water borne diseases

High prevalence of water borne diseases

Women and children walk long distances to fetch potable water

Poor access to portable water

Inadequate potable water schemes

Non functional pipe borne water supply

Insufficient treatment of water on community wells

Contanmination of available water sources

Insufficient community participation

Poor mobilization of communities

Limited knowledge on hygiene and sanitation

Poor maintenance

Insufficient funds

No maintenance committee put in place

 

LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: WATER RESOURCES

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Prevalence of water born diseases reduced By 2020, the  number of reported cases of water borne diseases reduce by at least 50% in all the communities with portable water –          Health centre records-          Testimonies Water pollution reduced
Specific objective Access to potable water increased At least 10 communities have  access to potable water by 2020 –          Administrative reports-          Visits-          Testimonies Favorable policy framework
Results 1. Potable water schemes increased At least 10 communities have functional portable water schemes by 2020 –          Site visits-          Administrative reports An enabling economic and political conditions
2. Functional water schemes increased All existing water schemes are maintained regularly and functional by 2015. –          Site visits-          Administrative reports An enabling economic and political conditions
3. Contamination of available water sources reduced. At least 20% of water sources in the municipality are good for drinking by 2015 –          Testimonies-          Site visits-          Council reports Community collaboration
Activities Quantity Place

Cost (cfa)

R1 Potable water schemes increased      
1.1 Conduct studies 46 Bweme, Mobenge, Ikoti I, Ikoti 2, Bekita, Bokuba,  Meangwe I, Bonabeanga, Basan,  Nwamoki, Iyombo, Ikoi, Dikome, Iwasa,  Ngamoki I, Moboka, Madie, Madie Newtown,Madie III, Boeme, Mapanja, Ngamoki II, Mofako, Dienge, Dipundu, Tombe, Banyo, Ndoi, Itali,  Debonda Koroki, Debonda mesina, Masaka, Bombangi, Babia bangam Ipongi, Bareka II, Lobem Batanga, Baromba, Bereka I, Manya, Lipenja, Ikenge, Esukotan, Iyoe, Illondo, Killekile, Mayaka, Esoki, Lowe 46,000,000
1.2 Submit project proposal for external funding 46 Transport200,000
1.3 Construct water schemes 46 1,840,000,000
R2 Functional water schemes increased 3 Toko, Madie Newtown, Madie Ngolo  
2.1 Mobilized community contribution 3 Toko, Madie Newtown, Madie Ngolo 600,000
2.2 Create and equip water maintenance committees 3 Toko, Madie Newtown, Madie Ngolo 1,500,000
2.3 Rehabilitate water schemes 3 Toko, Madie Newtown, Madie Ngolo 90,000,000
R3. Contamination of available water sources reduced      
3.1 Sensitize the communities on Hygiene  and sanitation 49 All villages 25,000,000
3.2 Enact and implement laws on use of sources of water 49 All villages
R4 Treatment of water in community  improved      
4.1  Institute levies for water   Toko
4.2  Train caretakers 49 Toko 1.000,000
Total     2.004.300.000
               

 

 

 

 

 

PROBLEM ANALYSIS: SECONDARY EDUCATION

 

Low scholarisation rate at secondary school level

High rate of school drop outs

High rate of illiteracy

Poor performance of school

Limited access to quality secondary education

Insufficient qualified teachers

Insufficient infrastructures (classrooms, latrines, water points, fences, play grounds)

Limited equipment  and Limited enrolment of students


LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: SECONDARY EDUCATION

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Global objective Illiteracy rate at the secondary level reduced By 2020, literacy rate increased by at least 20% in the municipality –          Administrative and management reports Favorable policy framework
Specific objective Access to quality secondary education increased At least 60% of pupils from primary school have access to secondary education and at least 60% obtain 4 “O” level subjects or more by 2015 –          GCE ‘O’ level results-          Administrative and management report Favorable economic and political environment
Results 1. Qualified teachers increased By 2015 each secondary schools have at least 10 qualified teachers –          Transfer decision-          Administrative and management report Favorable economic and political environment
2. Infrastructure increased All secondary and technical schools have at least five classroom blocks, a water point, a latrine, a library and workshop  by 2015. –          Visit to schools-          Administrative and management reports Favorable economic condition
3. Equipment increased By 2015, all classrooms constructed are equipped with desks , chairs, tables & blackboards –          Visits to schools-          Inventory records Favorable economic condition
Activities Quantity Place

Cost (cfa)

R1 Qualified teachers increased      
1.1 Lobby for the transfer of trained teachers 10 GSS Madie Ngole 5GSS Toko 5 Three trips to Buea and Yaounde300,000
R2 Infrastructure increased      
2.1 Construct classrooms and workshops 7 GSS Madie Ngolo 3GSS Toko 3GTC Lipenja  1 workshop 63,000,000
2.2 Construct latrines 3 GSS Madie Ngolo 3GSS Toko 3GTC Lipenja  1 workshop 10,500,000
2.3 Construct water points 3 GSS Madie Ngolo 3GSS Toko 3GTC Lipenja  1 workshop 6,000,000
2.4 Construct fences 3 GSS Madie Ngolo 3GSS Toko 3GTC Lipenja  1 workshop 12,000,000
R3  Equipment increased 4    
3.1 Supply desks 111 GSS Madie Ngolo 47GSS Toko 60GTC Lipenja 4 6,660,000
3.2 Supply teachers tables and chairs 6 lots of chairs and tables GSS Madie NgoloGSS TokoGTC Lipenja 1,500,000
Total     99.960.000
               

 

PROBLEM ANALYSIS: BASIC EDUCATION

 

High illiteracy rate

Poor result at public examinations

High rate of school drop outs

Juvenile delinquency

Limited access to quality basic education

Insufficient qualified teaching staff

Insufficient school infrastructure (classrooms, latrines, libraries, water points, staff residence

Insufficient school equipment / materials (benches, didactic materials)

Limited financial resources

Inadequate transfer of qualified staff


LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: BASIC EDUCATION

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Global objective Illiteracy rate at the basic level  reduced By 2020 at least 70% of children (half of them girls between the ages of 12 – 14) obtain F.S.L.C –          Reports of the inspectors of basic education-          F.S.L.C results –          Favorable policy framework-          Favorable economic and political environment
Specific objective Access to quality basic education increased By the year 2020 at least 80% of the children (half of them girls) within the municipality have access to quality basic education –          F.S.L.C results-          Administrative and management reports –          Favorable policy framework-           Favorable economic and political environment
Results 1. Qualified teachers increased At least 90% of nursery and primary schools have at least four functional qualified teachers by 2015. –          Transfer decisions-          Administrative and management reports –          Favorable policy framework-           Favorable economic and political environment
2. School infrastructure increase (classroom, latrines, libraries, water points, staff residence) At least 70% of nursery and primary schools in the municipality have at least four classrooms, a water point, a latrine and a library by 2015. –          Visit to schools-          Administrative and management report Favorable economic conditions
  3.  School equipment / materials increased By 2015 at least 70% of classrooms constructed are fully equipped with desks, chairs, tables, blackboards and required didactic materials yearly.   –          Visit to schools-          Administrative and management report Favorable economic conditions
Activities Quantity Place

Cost (cfa)

R1 Qualified teachers increased      
1.1 Lobby for the transfer of trained teachers 46 trained teachers needed GS: Madue Newtown, Madie, Ngolo, Boembi Madie III, Banyo, Mofako, Batamga, Bweme, Kilekile, Ikoi Ngolo, Dikome N, Moboka, Meangwe I, Toko, Betika, Dibonda, Bombangi, Lipenja, Ikenge, Esukotan Five trips to Buea and Yaounde 500,000
R2 School infrastructure increased      
2.1  Construct classrooms 94 GNS: 1 Toko, 1 LipenjaGS: Madei newtown 4, Madie Ngolo 4, Boembe Madie III 6, Banyo 6, Mofako, Batanga 6, Bweme 2, Kilekile 6, Ikoi Ngolo 4, Dikome 45, Maboka 6, Meangwe I 65, Toko 4, Betika 65, Dibonda 4, Bombangi 6, Lipenja 6, Ikenge 6, Esukotan 6.   752,000,000
2.2 Construct latrines 23 GNS: Toko, LipenjaGS Boembe Madie IIIBanyo, Dikome N, Moboka, Meangwe I, Toko, Betikas, Dibonda 35,000,000
2.3 Construct water points 23 All nursery and primary schools 40,000,000
2.4 Construct fences 23 All nursery and primary schools 40,000,000
R3  School equipment / materials increase      
3.1  Supply Desks 193 GNS: Toko 1GS: Madie Newtown 7, Banyo 7, Mofako Batanga 32, Kilekile 7, Ikoi Ngole 26, Dikome N 13, Mobota 20, Betika 36, Lipenka 12, Ikenge 30, Esukotan 8 11,580,000
3.2  Supply didactic materials 23 lots (assorted) All schools 20,000,000
3.3  Supply teachers tables and chairs 23 lots of Chairs and Tables All schools 10,000,000
Total     909.080.000
               

 

 

PROBLEM ANALYSIS: PUBLIC HEALTH

 

Drop in household income

High rate of rural exodus

High death rate

Poor health status

High cost of health treatment

Limited access to quality health care services

High infant mortality rate

High prevalence of diseases

Inadequate health infrastructure

Insufficient funds

Insufficient health equipment (beds, delivery kits, laboratory equipment)

Limited access to quality and affordable essential drugs

Insufficient qualified health personnel

Uneven distribution of health equipment

Few pro-pharmacies


LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: PUBLIC HEALTH

Strategy

Indicators

Sources of Verification

Assumptions

Level Formulation
Global objective Health status improved By 2015, the death rate reduces by a least 30% each year. –          Health centre records-          Testimonies –          Economic and political stability.-          Epidemic reduced
Specific objective Access to quality health services improved By 2015 at least 60% of the population have access to quality health services –          Health centre records-          Testimonies Cooperation of stakeholders
Results 1. Health infrastructure increased By 2015, all health centers created are constructed according to required specifications –          Visit to health centers-          Health centre reports Favorable economic and political environment
2. Health equipment increased (beds, delivery beds and kits, laboratory equipment etc) By 2020, all health centers have at least 50% of required basic equipment –          Visit to health centers.-          Inventory records Favorable economic and political environment
3.  Access to quality and affordable essential drugs increased All health centers have pro-pharmacies with regular supply of essential drugs by 2015 –          Visit to health centre and pro-pharmacy-          Testimonies Favorable economic and political environment
4.  Qualified health personnel increased By 2015 all centers have at least 3 functional qualified staff –          Health centre reports-          Transfer decisions Favorable policy framework
 Activities Quantity Place

Cost (cfa)

R1 Health infrastructure increased      
1.1 Renovate health centre 2 Dikome Ngolo & Lipenja 50.000.000
R2 Health equipment increased      
2.1 Supply normal beds 20 Dikome Ngolo & Lipenja 10.000.000
2.2 Supply delivery beds 4 Dikome Ngolo & Lipenja 2.000.000
2.3 Supply delivery kits   Dikome Ngolo & Lipenja 2.000.000
2.4 Supply laboratory equipment      
R3. Access to quality and affordable essential drugs increased      
3.1  Rehabilitate pharmacy 2 pharmacy Dikome Ngolo & Lipenja 10,000,000frs
3.2 Train local pharmacies 2 pharmacy Attendants Dikome Ngolo & Lipenja 500,000frs
R4. Qualified health personnel increased      
4.1  Lobby for the transfer of qualified staff 1 Assistant nurse1 nurse aid2 ward servants Toko and Dikome Ngolo & Lipenja 2 trips to Buea and Yaounde200,000frs
Total     74.700.000
               

 


PROBLEM ANALYSIS: COMMERCE

 

Insufficient revenue

Exploitation by traders (Buyam Sellams)

High rate of post harvest losses

High price speculation on products

Poor diversification of commercial activities 

Insufficient market facilities

Poor information on prices of goods in other areas

Insufficient capital

No market information system

Insufficient funds

Limited access to credits


LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: COMMERCE

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Global objective Commercial activities  increased within the municipality By 2014, revenue of the council  from commercial activities increase by at least 15% annually –          Accounts document-          Testimonies Favorable taxation policy
Specific objective Commercial activities increased Diversified commercial activities increase by at least 30% by 2015 –          Visit to business places-          Council revenue reports Enabling business climate
Results 1. Micro – enterprises increased At last 50 lucrative micro – enterprise exists by 2015 –          Visit to market-          Council report Favorable economic environment
2. Marketing of products improved By 2015 at least 70% of the population market their products in appropriate environment and fetch good prices –          Interviews with market masters.-          Radio announcements on market prices Availability of funds ensured
Commercial activities  increased within the municipality By 2014, revenue of the council  from commercial activities increase by at least 15% annually –          Visit to micro-finance-          Testimonies Laws establishing micro-finance institutions respected
Activities Quantity Place

Cost (cfa)

R1 Market facilities increased      
1.1 Construct market 1 Madie 35,000,000
1.2  Maintain markets 2 Madie, Meangwe I 10,000,000
R2 Information on prices of goods in other areas regularly disseminated      
2.1 Disseminate market prices of goods in other areas 4 areas Mundemba, Ekondo Titi, Kumba, Douala 4,000,000
R3. Capital increased      
3.1 Lobby for the creation of micro-finance institution 2 Madie & Lipenja Contact visits1,000,000
Total     59,000,000frs
               

PROBLEM ANALYSIS: AGRICULTURE & RURAL DEVELOPMENT

 

Insufficient availability of food in the municipality

Low income level

Rural exodus

Low agricultural production and productivity  

Pests and diseases attach on cocoa (black pod)

Insufficient use of improved planting materials

Poor farming practices

Limited access to improved planting materials

Poor farm maintenance

Limited access to fertilizers

Limited use of fungicides and pesticides

Limited use of fertilizers (organic and inorganic)

High rate of post harvest loss

Insufficient technical knowledge

Limited knowledge on post harvest losses

Limited access to post harvest facilities


LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: AGRICULTURE & RURAL DEVELOPMENT

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Global objective Agricultural products regularly available in the municipality Varieties of agricultural products available in the municipality all cropping seasons by 2015 –          Administrative reports-          Testimonies Favorable climatic conditions
Specific objective Agricultural production and productivity increased By 2015 at least 40% of farmers increase their yields by at least 10% yearly –          Farm visits-          Farm records-          Administrative reports Epidemic outbreak reduced
Results 1. Pests and diseases attack on cocoa (black pod) reduced At least 20% reduction in losses due to pests and diseases attack by 2015 –          Farm records / visits-          Administrative reports Favorable prices for fungicides and pesticides
2. Use of improved planting materials increased By 2013 at least 40% of farmers use improved planting materials yearly and experience an increase in yields, –          Farm records-          Administrative report Timely availability of improved planting materials
3.  Use of fertilizers increased (organic and inorganic) By 2015, at  least 30% of farmers use organic and inorganic fertilizers and increase their yields by at least 10% yearly. –          Farm records-          Administrative reports Favorable prices for inorganic fertilizers
4.  Farming practices improved By 2014 at least 30% of farmers practice improved farming techniques –          Farm visit administrative reports Bush fires reduced
  5. Post harvest losses reduced By 2014 at least 30% of farmers reduce post harvest losses by at least 50% –          Administrative reports-          Interviews Rural road network improved
Activities Quantity Place

Cost (cfa)

R1. Pests and diseases attack on cocoa (black pods) reduced      
1.1 Train farmers on pests and disease control 12 trainings All the villages 10,000,000
1.2  Organize farmers to have access to fungicides and pesticides 12 meetings All the villages 30,000,000
R2.  Use of improved planting materials increased      
2.1  Sensitize farmers on the use of improved planting materials 12 meetings All the villages 3,000,000
2.2 Distribute improved planting materials to farmers at a subsidize rate (SOWEDA rates) 10 trips500,000 cassava cuttings200000 maize seeds150000 plantain suckers500000 cocoa pots All the villages 250.000.000
R3 Use of fertilizers increased (organic and inorganic)      
3.1 Train farmers on soil improvement techniques 12 trainings All the villages 10,000,000
R4. Farming practices improved      
4,1 Train farmers on improved farming practices 12 trainings All the villages 10,000,000
R5. Post harvest losses reduced      
5.1Train farmers on post harvest losses 12 trainings All the villages 10,000,000
Total     323.000.000
               

 

 

 

Low intake of protein

Low income

Low living standard

High rate of diseases incidents

Low livestock production and productivity  

Poor livestock production practices (free range)

Limited use of improved livestock breeds

Limited use of quality livestock feed

Limited access to improved livestock breeds

Limited knowledge on improved livestock production

Limited access to quality livestock feed

Malnutrition

Limited access to veterinary drugs

PROBLEM ANALYSIS: LIVESTOCK  


LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: LIVESTOCK

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Global objective Nutritional conditions of the population improved At least 40% of the population increase protein intake by at least 10% annually –          Testimonies-          Health records Epidemic outbreak reduced
Specific objective Livestock production and productivity increased By 2020 at least 30% of the population keep livestock and increase production by at least 10% yearly –          Farm records-          Administrative reports Epidemic outbreak reduced
Results 1.  Livestock production practices improved At least 50% of livestock farmers practice improved breeding techniques by 2015 –          Farm visits Epidemic outbreak reduced
2. Use of improved livestock breed increased By 2015 at least 60% of farmers use improved livestock breed and increase the production –          Farm visits-          Administrative reports Favorable economic environment
3. Use of quality livestock feed increased By 2015 at least 50% of farmers use quality livestock feed and increase their production by at least 5% –          Farm records-          Administrative reports Favorable prices for livestock feed
4. Rate of diseases incident reduced By 2015, disease attack on animals reduce by at least 3% annually –          Farm records-          Administrative reports Epidemic outbreak reduced
Activities Quantity Place

Cost (cfa)

R1. Livestock production practices improved      
1.1  Train livestock farmers on improved practices 20 trainings All villages 10,000,000
R2. Use of improved livestock breeds increased      
2.1 Sensitize on improved livestock breeds at subsidized rates 10 trips All villages 200,000
R3  use of quality livestock feed increased      
3.1  Train livestock farmers on the production of livestock feed using local materials 20 trainings All villages 10,000,000
3.2  Link farmers up with livestock feed supplement sales stores 2 trips Kumba 100,000
R4.  Rate of diseases incidents reduced      
4.1 Lobby for the creation of veterinary clinics 2 trips Buea, Yaounde 500,000
4.2  Construct veterinary clinics 2 Toko and Madie Ngole 60,000,000
4.3  Train livestock farmers on disease prevention and treatment 10 All villages 1,000,000
4.4 Create farmer’s Association 15 Toko and Madie Ngole 1.500.000
Total     83.300.000
               

 

PROBLEM ANALYSIS:     FISHERIES

 

Low protein intake

Low income

Low fish production

No fish ponds

 

Poor fish harvesting methods (fish poisoning)

Insufficient knowledge in fish pond establishment

Insufficient technical knowledge

Limited access to improved fishing equipment

Insufficient funds to establish fish ponds

 

LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: FISHERIES 

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Global objective Nutritional intake of the population improved By 2015 at least 30% of the population increases their protein intake by at least 10% yearly. –          Testimonies-          Health records Stable economic environment
Specific objective Fish production and productivity  increased By 2015, the fishing population increase their harvest by at least 3% annually –          Administrative reports Fish poisoning reduced
Results 1.  Sustainable Fish harvesting methods increased By 2015, at least 50% of fish harvesting is done with improved equipment –          Visit to fishing  sites-          Administrative reports Environmental laws respected
2. Fish ponds increased At least 4 functional fish ponds exist in the municipality by 2015 –          Visit to fish ponds-          Administrative reports Stable economic environment
Activities Quantity Place

Cost (cfa)

R1 Fish harvesting methods reduced      
1.1 Organize training on improved fish harvesting methods 4 Toko, Dienge, Banyo, Lipenja 5,000,000
1.2 Distribute fishing equipment to fishermen / women 100 persons Toko, Dienge, Banyo, Lipenja 20,000,000
R2. Fish ponds increased      
2.1 Train farmers on fish production 4 training Toko 4,000,000
2.2 Assist farmers in the construction of fish ponds 4 ponds Toko, Dienge, Banyo, Lipenja 40,000,000
2.3  Supply fingerlings to fish farmers 4 farmers   2,000,000
Total     51.000.000
               

PROBLEM ANALYSIS:     STATE PROPERTY AND LAND TENURE

 

Illegal possession of land

High rate of conflicts between individuals and neighboring villages

High insecurity of state property and land

Poor management of state property and land

 

Absence of title deeds for state property and land occupied

Poor community sensitization on the importance of land titles and how to obtain them

No management strategy put in place

 

LOGICAL FRAMEWORK:  STATE PROPERTY AND LAND TENURE

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Global objective Security of State and Private properties improved. By 2015 at least 40% of state property and land  secured –          Visits-          Administrative reports –          Favorable land tenure policy.-          Enabling political and economic climate
Specific objective Legal possession of land increased. By 2015 at least 30% of Government property are in good state with reduced  illegal possession –          Visits-          Land certificates-          Administrative reports- –          Favorable land tenure policy.-          Favorable political and economic climate
Results 1. Title deeds for state and private land increased. At least 20% of land have land certificates and are developed by 2015 Land certificates Conflict management ensured
2. Management of state property and land occupied improved By 2015, a management plan is developed and implemented by all stakeholders. Management plan Collaboration of all stakeholders
Activities Quantity Place

Cost (cfa)

R1.  Title deeds for state and private land increased.      
1.1 Sensitize population on land ownership procedures 2 meetings Toko and Madie Ngolo 300,000
1.2  Issue land certificates As requested Toko and Madie Ngolo 100,000
R2 Management of state property and land occupied improved      
2.1  Developed a management plan 2 workshops Toko and Madie Ngolo 1,000,000
2.2  Monitor implementation of plan 8 times Toko and Madie Ngolo 4,000,000
Total     5.300.000
               

Unattractive towns

Poor hygiene and sanitation

Few visitors

Poor town planning and housing

No master plan for Toko and Madie Ngolo towns

Poor collaboration with town planning officials

Poorly constructed houses (use of temporal and local materials)

Haphazard building of houses

None issuing of building permits

No strategy put in place to promote permanent houses (cement blocks)

PROBLEM ANALYSIS: HOUSING & URBAN DEVELOPMENT
LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: HOUSING & URBAN DEVELOPMENT

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Master plan for the municipality developed At least 3 major towns in the municipality have master plans by 2015 –          Town visit

–          Administrative reportsCollaboration between council and urban development and housingSpecific objective Town planning improvedBy 2015, the towns of Toko, Madie 1 and Lipenja are well presented with streets-          Town visit

–          Administrative reportsCollaboration between council and urban development and housingResults 1. Master plans of the municipality made availableMaster plans of Toko, Madie 1 and Lipenja put in place and used by 2013-          Master plan

–          Administrative reportsCollaboration between council and urban development and housing2.  Construction of houses using permanent materials increasedAt least 30% of the houses in the municipality are permanent structures by 2015-          Permits

–          Council reportsCollaboration between council and urban development and housing3.  Haphazard building of houses reducedAt least 40% of the population construct their houses with building permits by 2015-          Town visits

–          Council reportsFavorable economic conditionsActivitiesQuantityPlace

Cost (cfa)

R1 Master plans for Toko and Madie Ngolo towns made available   1.1  Design master plans3Toko, Lipenja and Madie Ngolo2 000,0001.2 Monitor the implementation of master plan6 timesToko, Lipenja and Madie Ngolo4,000,000R2 Haphazard building of houses reduced   2.1 Sensitize  population2 meetingsToko, Lipenja and Madie Ngolo400,0002.2 Issue building permitsAs requestedToko, Lipenja and Madie Ngolo100,0002.3  Monitor the building of houses6 timesToko, Lipenja and Madie Ngolo4,000,000R3. Constructed of houses improved (use of permanent materials)   3.1  Sensitize population on use of permanent materials2 meetingsToko, Lipenja and Madie Ngolo400,000Total  10.900.000 

 

 

 

 

Poor hygiene and sanitation

Increased rate of pollution

Increased rate of erosion

High rate of environmental degradation 

Poor management of natural resources

High rate of water pollution

Poor drainage system

Poor waste management

No waste management strategies put in place

High rate of illegal exploitation of timber

PROBLEM ANALYSIS: ENVIRONMENT AND NATURE PROTECTION  
LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: ENVIRONMENT AND NATURE PROTECTION

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Rate of pollution reduced Water and air pollution reduce in the municipality by at least 20% by 2015 –          Site visits-          Administrative reports Environmental laws respected
Specific objective Environmental degradation reduced Environmental degradation due to human practices reduce by at least 20% by 2015 –          Site visits-          Testimonies

–          Administrative reports-          Environmental laws respected-          Community collaborationResults1. Management of natural resources improvedAt least 20% of natural resources are sustainably managed by 2015-          Visits to forests, water sources and famers-          Administrative reports-          Environmental laws respected-          Community collaboration2.  Waste management improvedBy 2014 a functional waster management system is put in place-          Town visits-          Council reportsCommunity collaboration3.  Drainage system improvedBy 2014, drainage systems are constructed, functional and regularly maintained-          Site visits-          Council reports-          Favorable economic conditions-          Community collaborationActivitiesQuantityPlaceCost (cfa)R1. Management of natural resource improved   1.1 Sensitize the population49 meetingsAll villages4,900,000R2  Waste management improved   2.1  Sensitize population on domestic waste and sewage disposal4 townsToko, Lipenja, Dikome and Madie Ngolo200,0002.2  Install garbage cans in strategic places40Toko, Lipenja, Dikome and Madie Ngolo2,000,0002.3 Dispose content of garbage cans regularly40 (weekly)Toko, Lipenja, Dikome and Madie Ngolo10,000,0002.4  Create a garbage disposal site2Toko and Madie Ngolo2,000,000R3  Drainage system improved   3.1  Construct culverts and gutters2 townsToko and Madie Ngolo10,000,0003.2 Maintain culvers and gutters2 townsToko and Madie Ngolo5,000,000Total  34.100.000

 

 

Limited income NTFP
Extinction of forest values
Degradation of the forest
Unsustainable exploitation of forest resources

Illegal exploitation of timber Limited implementation of the law   Limited forestation   Decline in non timber forest products   No forestation strategy put in place   Limited sources of protein Illegal hunting   Non domestication of NTFPs Unsustainable harvesting of NTFPs Limited sources of alternative income PROBLEM ANALYSIS: FORESTRY AND WILDLIFE LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: FORESTRY AND WILDLIFE Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions Level Formulation Overall objective Extinction of forest resources reduced By 2015, destruction of biodiversity reduced by at least 20% –          Administrative report –          Visits to forest –          Forest laws respected –           Fire disasters reduce Specific objective Management of forest resources improved By 2015 at least 50% of the population practice sustainable forest management techniques –          Site visits –          Administrative report   –          Forest laws respected   Results 1. Illegal exploitation of timber reduced By 2015, Illegal exploitation of the forest reduced by at least 20% –          Administrative report –          Visits to forest –          Forest laws respected –          Conflict over land use reduced 2. Illegal hunting reduced By 2015, Illegal hunting reduced by at least 20% –          Administrative report –          Testimonies –          Forest laws respected   3. Non timber forest products sustainably managed By 2015 at least 10.000 NTFPs are domesticated and sustainably harvested –          Visits to forest and farms –          Testimonies Community collaboration 4.  Forestation increased.  By 2015 at least 5000 trees are planted in the municipality –          Visits to the forest –          Community collaboration Activities Quantity Place COST (CFA) R1 Illegal exploitation of timber reduced       1.1  Sensitize the population on forestry laws 49 All villages 4,900,000 1.2 Issue permits for forestry exploitation 5 Toko 1.000,000 R2.  Illegal hunting reduced       2.1  Sensitize the population on illegal hunting 49 meetings All villages 4,900,000 R3.  Non timber forest products sustainably managed (NTFPs)       3.1  Organized trainings on domestication and sustainable harvesting of NTFPs 49 All villages 4,900,000 3.2 Supply NTFPs seedlings for planting 10,000 seedlings All villages 10,000,000 R4. Forestation increased       4.1 Sensitize the population on forestation 49 All villages 4,900,000 4.2 Supply tree seedlings for planting 5000 seedlings All villages 5,000,000 Total     35.600.000       PROBLEM ANALYSIS:     TOURISM & LEISURE   Few tourists    Low revenue from the tourism sector    Poor development of tourist potentials  Absence of tourist infrastructures (hotel, restaurants, guest houses)  Poor community mobilization     Poor development of tourist sites     Poor economic power Poor attraction of tourists LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: TOURISM & LEISURE Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions Level Formulation Overall objective Revenue from the tourism sector  increased Annual revenue from the tourism sector increase by at least 20% –          Council accounts records –          Testimonies Favorable economic and political conditions Specific objective Development of tourist potentials increased By 2015 at least 100 tourists visit the municipality annually –          Council reports –          testimonies Favorable political conditions Results 1. Tourist infrastructures such as hotels and restaurants increased By 2014 at least 1 functional standard hotel and restaurant exist in the municipality –          site visit –          administrative  reports Enabling economic conditions 2.  Development of tourist sites increased At least 3 tourist sites are developed and attract tourists by 2014 –          site visits –          council report Enabling economic conditions 3.  Community mobilization improved By 2014, at least 10  tourist guides  trained and functional –          testimonies –          council reports Community solidarity ensured Activities Quantity Place Cost (cfa) R1. Touristic infrastructures such as hotels and restaurants increased       1.1 Construct hotel and restaurant 1 Toko 50,000,000 R2. Development of tourist sites increased       2.1  Develop tourist sties 3   12,000,000 R3. Community mobilization improved       3,1 Train local tourist guides 10 youths Toko 1,000,000 Total     63.000.000       PROBLEM ANALYSIS:     ARTS & CULTURE   Loss of cultural values    Rural exodus     High deterioration rate of cultural values   Poor development and promotion of cultural activities   Poor community mobilization      Few cultural infrastructure (community halls) museums     Uncultured youthful population Limited cultural contribution in the economic growth  LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: ARTS & CULTURE Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions Level Formulation Overall objective Cultural values enhanced By 2015, Cultural awareness within the municipality increase by at least 50% –          reports Stable economic and political climate Specific objective Deterioration of cultural values reduced Cultural values in the  municipality are practiced by at least 50% of the population by 2015 –          testimonies –          reports Community solidarity ensured Results 1. Development and promotion of cultural activities increased By 2015, at least 50% of cultural activities are revived and practiced in the municipality –          testimonies –          administrative reports Stable political climate 2.  Cultural infrastructures established By 2015 at least 2 functional community halls and museums exist and are used –          site visits –          council reports Stable economic environment 3. Community mobilization improved At least 60% of the population take part in cultural activities yearly –          reports –          testimonies Community solidarity ensured Activities Quantity Place Cost (cfa) R1. Development and promotion of cultural activities increased       1.1 Develop a strategy to revive cultural activities 1 meeting Toko 500,000 1.2 Organize cultural activities 10 cultural activities Toko, Madie Ngolo and Lipenja 50,000,000 R2.  Cultural infrastructures such as community halls and museums increased       2.1 Construct community halls and museums 3 Toko, Madie Ngolo and Lipenja 100,000,000 R3.  Community mobilization improved       3.1  Sensitize the population on the organization of cultural activities 49 meetings All villages 4,900,000 Total     155.400.000   PROBLEM ANALYSIS: INDUSTRY, MINES AND TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT   Limited benefits by the population and the council from the mining sector    High rate of poverty in the communities     Poor development of the industrial and mining sector  Non availability of database on research carried out on mines  Poor community mobilization      Limited Knowledge on mining potentials      Non financing of micro –projects by companies LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: INDUSTRY MINES AND TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions Level Formulation Overall objective Industrial base of the municipality increased Council industrial policy put in place  by 2013 –          Visits –          Administrative reports –            Favorable policy framework Specific objective Development of the mining and industrial  sector improved At least one feasibility studies conducted by 2014 –          Administrative reports –          Testimonies Favorable policy framework Results 1. Mining activities in the municipality promoted  At least 1 processing industry functional by 2015 –          Prospection reports –          data Favorable policy framework 2. An industrial zone put in place By 2015 at leas one industrial zone exists –          Site visits –          Reports Favorable political climate Activities Quantity Place Cost (cfa) R1. Data base on research carried out made available       1.1 Contact mining companies 1 trip Yaounde and Douala 250,000 R2.  Mining industries put in place       2.1 Lobby for mining industry 1 trip Yaoune and Douala 250,000 R3. Community mobilization improved       3.1  Sensitize communities 49 meetings All villages 2,500,000 Total     3.000.000       PROBLEM ANALYSIS: COMMUNICATION   Poor circulation of information     Poor exposure to the outside world      Poor access to information    Poor access to radio, TV and internet signals  Limited availability of newspaper       Absence of community radio       Population is less informed  LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: COMMUNICATION Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions Level Formulation Overall objective Circulation of information improved By 2015, at least 50% of the population are informed on major events –          Testimonies –          Reports Favorable policy framework Specific objective Access to information increased .By 2015 at least 50% of the population can regularly send and receive information –          Testimonies –          Reports Favorable policy framework Results 1. Access to radio, TV and internet signals improved By 2015, at 30% of the population receive CRTV and other signals –          Home visits –          Reports Favorable policy framework 2.  Community radio put in place By 2015, at least one functional community radio exist in the municipality –          Visit to radio –          Reports Favorable economic conditions 3. Circulation of news papers increased By 2014 at least one functional newspaper vendor exist in the municipality –          Available newspapers –          Reports Favorable economic conditions Activities Quantity Place Cost (cfa) R1 Access to radio, TV and internet signals improved       1.1 Lobby for the installation of CRTV transmission antennas 2 trips Buea, Yaounde 500,000 R2. Community radio put in place       2.1 Lobby for the creation of a community radio 2 trips Buea, Yaounde 500,000 2.2 Install community radio 1 Toko 25,000,000 R3. Circulation newspaper increased       3.1 Contact newspaper vendors 2 trips Kumba and Buea 300,000 Total     26.300.000 PROBLEM ANALYSIS: POST AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS   Poor communication with people within and out of the country      Limited access to postal services and telecommunications    Poor mobile telecommunication network   No fixed telephone network        Non functional post office       Population is less informed   LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: POST AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions Level Formulation Overall objective Communication with people within and out of the country improved By 2015 at least 50% of the population regularly send and receive information using telecommunication –          Testimonies –          reports Favorable policy framework Specific objective Access to postal services and telecommunication increased By 2015 at least 50% of the population are satisfied with postal and telecommunication services –          testimonies Favorable policy framework Results 1. Mobile telecommunication network increased By 2015 at least 2 functional mobile telephone networks exist in the municipality –          list of subscribers –          testimonies Stable economic environment 2.  Functional post office put in place By 2015 at least 1 functional post office exist in the municipality –          visit –          administrative reports –          testimonies Favorable policy framework Activities Quantity Place Cost (cfa) R1.  Mobile telecommunication network increased       1.1 Lobby for the extension of mobile telephone networks 2 trips Buea. Yaounde 1,000,000 R2. Functional post office put in place       2.1 Lobby for the creation of a post office 2 trips Buea, Yaounde 500,000 2.2  Construct post office 1 Toko 18,000,000 2.3  Lobby for the transfer of staff 2 trips Buea, Yaounde 500,000 Total     20.000.000   PROBLEM ANALYSIS: LABOUR AND SOCIAL SECURITY   High rate of unemployment      High rate of rural exodus      High rate of job insecurity     Insufficient number of established enterprises and organizations  Limited self-employment opportunities          Social instability   LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: LABOUR AND SOCIAL SECURITY Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions Level Formulation Overall objective Job security increased At least 50% of the working population have job security by 2015 –          Testimonies –          Administrative reports Favorable economic climate Specific objective Employee Social security payments improved By 2015, 50% employers regularly contribute social security for  their workers –          Testimonies –          Administrative reports Favorable economic climate Results 1. Stable Institutions increased  By 2014 at least 5 stable and profitable institutions established within the municipality   –          Visit –           council reports Favorable economic climate Activities Quantity Place Cost (cfa) R1.  Established enterprises and organizations increased       1.1 Support the establishment of enterprises 5 Toko and Madie Ngolo 11,000,000 1.2 sensitize workers on social security policies such as pensions, allowances, industrial risks etc. 2 meetings Toko and Madie Ngolo 5,400.000 Total     16.400.000     PROBLEM ANALYSIS: PUBLIC SECURITY Increased crime wave      Reduced population       High rate of insecurity      Insufficient security officers   Poor lighting of the municipality   Rural exodus    No permanent structures for gendarmes, police and customary court     LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: PUBLIC SECURITY Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions Level Formulation Overall objective Crime ware reduced By 2015, at least 40% of the population in the municipality circulate freely and live in peace –          Testimonies –          Administrative reports Enabling economic and political climate Specific objective Insecurity reduced By 2015 the number of criminal cases reduce by at least 30% yearly –          Testimonies –          Security reports Enabling economic and political climate Results 1. Security officers increased By 2015 at least 10 new elements of the  forces of law and order are transferred and functional –          Transfer decision –          Administrative reports Favorable policy framework  2. Permanent structures for forces of law and order and customary court put in place By 2015 gendarmerie brigade, police post and customary court structures are constructed and functional –          Visit  –          Administrative reports Favorable policy framework  3.  Lighting of the municipality increased By 2015, the streets of Toko and Madie Ngolo are regularly lighted. –          Visit –          Council reports Favorable policy framework  Activities Quantity Place Cost (cfa) R1  Security officers increased       1.1 Lobby for the transfer of security officers 10 security officers 2 trips Buea and Yaounde 500,000 R2.  Permanent structures for Gendarmes, police and customary court put in place       2.1  Construct Gendarme brigade, police post and customary court 3 structures Toko 100,000,000 R3.  Lighting of the municipality increased       3.1  Install street lights 2 towns Toko and Madie Ngolo 20,000,000 Total     120.500.000 PROBLEM ANALYSIS: TERRITORIAL ADMINISTRATION AND DECENTRALIZATION   Poor realization of community projects       Suspicious community members        Reduced Trust between communities and the Local Administration       Poor collaboration between communities and local administration.   Poor community awareness, commitment and mobilization   Poor development of the community     LOGICAL FRAMEWORK:  TERRITORIAL ADMINISTRATION AND DECENTRALIZATION Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions Level Formulation Overall objective Peaceful coexistence and mutual respect within the municipality By 2015 at least 70% of communities express willingness to collaborate with local administrators –          Visits –          Administrative reports Favorable economic and political condition Specific objective Trust in local administration increased By 2014 at least 50% of the population respect their chiefs, community laws and the local administration –          Testimonies –          Reports  Enabling political climate Results 1. Collaboration improved and classification of Chiefs improved By 2014 at least 60% of Chiefs are recognized and serve as auxiliaries of the administration. –          Testimonies –          Administrative Reports  Enabling political climate 2. Community awareness, commitment & mobilization improved By 2014, at least 60% of the population regularly participates in meetings initiated by the administration. –          Testimonies –          Reports  Collaboration community members ensured Activities Quantity Place Cost (cfa) R1. Leadership improved       1.1 Train & classify traditional rulers on leadership and management 1 training for 49 Chiefs and 20 Chiefs reclassified Toko 5,000,000 R2.  Community mobilization improved       2.1 Sensitize communities on self-help development 49 meetings All villages 4,900,000 Total     9.900.000   PROBLEM ANALYSIS: SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH AND INNOVATION   Reduced production and productivity        Limited access to improved technology        Poor dissemination of research findings     Non participatory technology development   Poor economic benefits     LOGICAL FRAMEWORK:  SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH AND INNOVATION Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions Level Formulation Overall objective Access to Scientific benefits increased within the municipality By 2015 at least 70% of the population have  access to scientific innovations  –          Testimonies –          Administrative reports Favorable economic climate Specific objective Technological innovations increased By 2015,  improved scientific technologies in agriculture and livestock available within the municipality –          Visits –          Administrative Reports  Appropriateness of technology ensured  Results 1. Dissemination of scientific innovations (inputs) improved By 2015 scientific inputs in agriculture and livestock made available in 49 villages –          Testimonies –          Field visits –          Reports   Timeliness and appropriateness of research findings 2. Research outreach programs increased By 2013, research outreach programs  exist in the municipality –          Testimonies –          Research Reports  Collaboration of stakeholders ensured Activities Quantity Place Cost (cfa) R1. Dissemination of research findings improved       1.1  Develop research dissemination strategy 1 Research centre Barombi Kang and Ekona 100,000 1.2 Implement research dissemination strategy 1 All villages 5,000,000 R2. Participatory technology development increased       2.1 Sensitize communities 49 meetings All villages 4,900,000 2.2  Conduct research with stakeholders 20 on farm trials 20 villages (to be determined by researchers) 10,000,000 Total     20.000.000   PROBLEM ANALYSIS: SOCIAL AFFAIRS Insufficient awareness on the availability of social benefits for vulnerable persons. No assistance to vulnerable population Non existence of social workers Absence of social center Insufficient social services Increase in psychological trauma     LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: SOCIAL AFFAIRS Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions Level Formulation Overall objective Assistance to vulnerable population increased By 2015, at least 70% of vulnerable persons are empowered and satisfied with the services rendered    –          reports –          testimonies Enabling political and economic conditions Specific objective Social services improved By 2015 at least 70% of vulnerable persons have access to quality social services -Reports -Testimonies Enabling economic conditions Results     1.Social Centers increased At least 2 functional social centers exist by 2014 -Site visits -Reports Enabling economic conditions 2.Social workers increased By 2014, at least 4 functional trained social workers exist -Transfer decision -Administrative report Favorable policy framework 3.Awareness on available social benefits for vulnerable persons increased At least 80% of vulnerable persons know their social benefits and at least 70% get them regularly -Administrative reports -Testimonies Enabling economic conditions Activities Quantity Place Costs (CFA) R1. Social centers increased       1.1. Construct social centers 2 Toko and Madie Ngolo 100,000,000 R2. Social workers increased       2.1. Lobby for the transfer of social workers 2trips , 2staff Buea and Yaounde 500,000 R3 Awareness on available social benefits for vulnerable persons increased.       3.1. Sensitize vulnerable persons on social benefits and how they can have access to them. 2 meetings Toko and Madie Ngolo 200,000 Total     100.700.000   PROBLEM ANALYSIS: YOUTH & CITIZEN EDUCATION   Poverty among youths High illiteracy rate High rate of rural exodus High prevalence of HIV/AIDS High rate of unemployment Juvenile delinquency Insufficient empowerment of the youth. Insufficient trainers and youth animators Absence of youth empowerment structures Poor mobilization of youth.         Prostitution Early marriages of the girl child                           LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: YOUTH & CITIZEN EDUCATION Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions Level Formulation Overall objective Awareness on youthful living and civic  responsibilities increased At least 70% of youths are living responsible lives by 2014 -Visit -Reports Favorable economic conditions Specific objective Youth empowerment facilities and programs increased By 2014, realistic youth programs are drawn up and implemented yearly in conducive environments -Visit -reports Favorable education policy Results   Trainers and youth animators increased By 2014 at least 2 functional youths animators are in place and functional -visit -Report Favorable economic conditions   Youth empowerment structures and services increased By 2015 at least 1 youth animation centre is constructed and functional -Transfer decision -Administrative report Favorable policy framework.   Mobilization of youths on income generating activities increased At least 10% of youths operate gainful businesses by 2014 -Reports Enabling political conditions. Activities Quantity Place Cost (CFA) R1. Youth empowerment structures increased       1.1. Construct youth and animation centers 2 Toko and Madie Ngolo 100,000.000 R2. Trainers and youth animators increased       2.1. Lobby for the transfers of trainers and youth animators 2 animators 2 trips Buea and Yaounde 500,000 R3. Mobilization of youths improved       3.1. sensitize youths 49 meetings All villages 4,900,000 Total     105.400.000   Insufficient sports activities. Low rate of physical exercise  Insufficient sport teachers Insufficient sports equipment in schools Insufficient sporting activities Insufficient sport competitions Poor development of sports and leisure discipline No sports complex PROBLEM ANALYSIS: SPORTS AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION           LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: SPORTS AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions Level Formulation Overall objective Physical education exercises increased. By 2015, at least 50% of the population carry out physical exercises -Testimonies -Visits Change of attitude in sporting activities  Specific objective Sporting activities increased  Diversified sporting activities increased by at least 20%  and promoted regularly  -Reports -Observations  Enabling economic conditions Results                   1.Sports equipment in schools increased  By 2015 each school is equipped with at least 3 sports equipment -School records -Visits  Enabling economic conditions  2.Sports teachers increased  At least 5 functional trained teachers in place by 2013 -Transfer decision -Reports Favorable policy framework. 3.Sports complex increased  At least 2 sports complex exist and used. -Visits -Reports Enabling economic conditions. 4.Local sports activities increased At least 2 sports competitions organized yearly -Council reports -Testimonies Enabling economic conditions Activities Quantity Place Cost (CFA) R1. Sports equipment in primary schools increased       1.1. supply schools with sports equipment 24 All villages with G. S and G.S.S and Technical Schools 20.000,000 R2. Sports teachers increased        2.1. Lobby for 5sports teachers 1 trip Buea and Yaounde 300,000 R3. Sports platform increased       3.1. Construct sport complex 2 Toko    35,000,000 R.4. Local sports activities increased       4.1 Organize football competitions 2 Toko and Madie Ngolo 2,000,000 Total     57.300.000 PROBLEM ANALYSIS: EMPLOYMENT AND VOCATIONAL TRAINING High crime wave High rate of illegal activities (smuggling) Low exploitation of human potentials Juvenile delinquency High unemployment rate Insufficient skills for professional self employment Insufficient employment opportunities Limited social economic operators for apprenticeship                 Limited capital for individual ventures Little self employment Limited Access to credit facilities Few enterprises               LOGICAL FRAMEWORK:  EMPLOYMENT AND VOCATIONAL TRAINING Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions   Level Formulation   Overall objective Skills development increased. By 2015, marketable skills transferred to at least 40% of persons within the employable age  -Testimonies -Trainees evaluation reports  Enabling economic conditions     Specific objective Employment increased  By 2015, at least 40% of individuals with professional skills are gainfully employed  -Employment contracts -Testimonies  Enabling economic conditions   Results                                         1.Training opportunities increased   By 2014,at least 500 individuals trained on small business start ups -Reports -Testimonies   Favorable policy framework    2.Self employment increased By 2015, at least 50% of those trained are self employed – Visit to business places – Tax receipts Enabling business climate   Activities Quantity Place Cost (CFA) R1. Employment opportunities increased         1.1. Lobby for the establishment of business enterprises 10 businesses 2 trips Kumba and Douala 300,000   R2. Self employment increased          2.1. Link youths to various social economic operators such as hair dressers, mechanics, carpenters etc. 1 trip Mundemba and Toko 500,000   2.2. Support unemployed trained and supported with seed capital (PIAISI) 500 persons Toko, Madie, Lipenja, Dikome 210.000.000   Total     210.800.000                                   PROBLEM ANALYSIS: TRANSPORT Poor circulation  Low economic activities Frequent accidents  High cost of transport fares Limited means of transportation. Poor state of vehicles Few transport vehicles  Irregular maintenance of vehicles Over loading of vehicles and motorbikes No transport agencies                                                                                                                                                                                            LOGICAL FRAMEWORK:  TRANSPORT Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions Level Formulation Overall objective Circulation of goods and persons improved  At least 50% of the population move safely and on time within and outside the municipality by 2015 -Observations -Council records -Testimonies Favorable economic and political conditions   Specific objective Means of transportation improved   By 2015, at least 50% of the population travel in good vehicles with affordable fares -Testimonies -Council records  Cooperation of transporters ensured  Results               1.Transport vehicles increased   By 2015, transport vehicles and motorbikes increase by at least 40% -Council records -Observations   Enabling economic conditions  2.State of vehicles improved   At least 70% of vehicles and motorbikes are regularly maintained -Visit to garages -Testimonies -Records of broken down vehicles Enabling economic conditions. 3.Overloading of vehicles and motorbikes reduced   At least 40% of passengers travel comfortably in vehicles and on motorbikes regularly. -Testimonies -Transport records Cooperative transporters union  Activities Quantity Place Cost (CFA) R1. Transport vehicles increased        1.1. Organize meetings with transporters  2 meetings Toko and Madie Ngolo 20.000,000 R2. State of vehicles improved        2.1. Sensitize transporters on the importance of vehicle maintenance  2 meetings  Toko and Madie Ngolo 20.000,000 R3. Overloading of vehicles and motorbikes reduced       3.1. Sensitize passengers and transporters 2 meetings Toko and Madie Ngolo  20.000,000 3.2. Sanction defaulters – – – Total     60.000.000 Under development  Insufficient number of elites with gainful   professions Limited access to higher education Absence of  professional schools   Poor orientation toward higher education   Poor lobbying  PROBLEM ANALYSIS: HIGHER EDUCATION                                   LOGICAL FRAMEWORK:  HIGHER EDUCATION Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions Level Formulation Overall objective Number of professional institutions  increased At least 1 professional institution exist in the municipality by 2014 -Testimonies -Reports Enabling economic conditions   Specific objective Access to quality higher education increased At least 25% of youths obtain Diplomas and degrees by 2015 -Enrollment register -Testimonies  Favorable economic and political environment   Results     1. Access to professional schools increased At least 25% of youths are admitted into professional schools by 2015 -Visit -Decision creating the school    Favorable political environment 2. Higher professional schools in the division increased At least 1 professional school created  by 2014 -Testimonies   Enabling economic conditions. Activities Quantity Place Cost (CFA) R1. higher  professional schools increased       1.1. Lobby for the creation of higher professional school  2 trips Buea and Yaounde 1.500,000 R2. Orientation on higher education enhanced        2.1. organize orientation meetings in schools   3  G.S.S Madie Ngolo G.S.S Toko G.T.C Lipenja   3.000,000 Total     4.500.000   PROBLEM ANALYSIS: SMALL AND MEDIUM SIZE ENTERPRISES AND HANDICRAFT High rate of unregistered activities  Weak tax base of the council  High rate of unemployment  Few Actors in the Informal Sector High rate of exploitation of mangroves for fish smoking Limited access to the services provided within this sector  Low business knowledge and skills of the population  Few business operators within the municipality   LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: SMALL AND MEDIUM SIZE ENTERPRISES AND HANDICRAFT Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions Level Formulation Overall objective Actors in the Informal Sector within the municipality increased By 2015  informal sector actors increase by at least 35% yearly –          council revenue reports –          testimonies –          security ensured –          enabling economic environment Specific objective Small and medium size  enterprises increased By 2015 at least 40 small and medium size enterprises are operational in the municipality –          Visit –          Council reports enabling economic environment Results 1. Capacity and skills of the population for informal sector activities increased At least 400 persons  acquire knowledge and skills and operate small enterprise (restoration, woodwork, hair dressers, mechanics, tailoring) –          Visit to business places –          Council reports –          enabling economic environment –          enthusiasm of the population 2.  Access to the services of small and medium size enterprises increased At least 70% of the population attend various training organized by this sector by 2013 Training reports –          enabling economic environment –          wiliness of the population ensured Activities Quantity Place Cost (cfa) R1.  Capacity and skills of the population increased        1.1 Organize sensitization meetings for people to attend training / apprentices 49 meetings All villages 1,000,000 1.2  Support  the establishment of small and medium size enterprises 400 persons Madie I, Lipenja, Toko   13, 700,000 R2  Access to the services of small and medium size enterprises increased       2.1 Lobby for the transfer of at least 2 qualified staff 2 trips Buea and Yaounde 300,000 2.2 Train on various trades and crafts 3 trainings All village 5, 000,000 Total     20.000.000   PROBLEM ANALYSIS: – TOKO COUNCIL Poor development of the municipality Unrealistic project Unsustainable exploitation of natural resources Poor standard of living of the population     Poor revenue collection Limited implementation of management procedures Insufficient sources of revenue   Insufficient involvement of stakeholders in the implementation of development projects  Poor staff evaluation Poor staff motivation Insufficient funds  Poor management of council assets   Poor collaboration with main stakeholders   Poor staff performance  Few qualified staff No approved council, 1 organigram No internal rules and regulations for staff  No clearly defined job descriptions Poor human resource management  Weak Functional capacity of the council V  LOGICAL FRAMEWORK:  TOKO COUNCIL Strategy Indicators Sources of verification Assumption Level Formulation Overall objective Development of the council sustainably improved   At least 40% of the population have access to basic facilities such as water, light, health, roads etc by 2015 –  Visits –  Observations –  Pictures – Administrative reports Enabling economic and political environment  Specific objective Functional capacity of Toko council strengthened    By 2015, at least 50% of earmarked projects are realized and benefit the population  –  Testimonies –  Administrative report –  Visits –  Pictures  – Collaboration of main stakeholders – Enabling economic conditions Results         1. Human resource management improved – By 2015, the council is equipped with sufficient qualified staff and regularly motivated. – By 2012 the council has an approved 2 organigram me in place and implemented  –  List of council staff – Organigram – Council reports  – Permanent residence of staff ensured  – Favorable policy framework 2.  Funds increased Council funds increased yearly by at least 5% and used following budget allocations –           Financial report –          Testimonies Favorable economic conditions 3. Management of council assets increased By 2015 at least 50% of council basic assets are acquired and used according to laid down procedures –          Visit –          Council report Favorable economic conditions Collaboration of all stakeholders ensured 4.  Collaboration with main stakeholders improved By 2013, at least 50% of the main stakeholders participate in the realization of development projects in the municipality -Testimonies Council reports   Conducive political climate Activities Quantity Place Cost (cfa) R1 Human resource management improved       1.1 Approve council organigram 1 Toko 200.000 1.2 Train staff and councilors 4 trainings according to assessed needs Toko, CEFAM, Buea 20.000.000 1.3 Organize staff meeting Monthly Toko 6.000.000 1.4 Define job descriptions and internal rules and regularities 1 Toko 200.000 1.5 Pay staff salaries Monthly Toko 24.000.000 1.6 Evaluate staff performance Once a year : 4 years Toko 400.000 R2 Funds increased       2.1 Identify potential sources of revenue 1 meeting Toko 200.000 2.2 Develop strategies for effective collection of revenue 1 meeting Toko 200.000 2.3 Write project proposals for external funding 5 projects Toko 1.000.000 2.4 Carry out annual auditing Once a year: 4 years Toko 4.000.000 2.5 Lobby for a municipal treasurer 2 trips Buea and Yaounde 300.000 R3 Management of council assets increased       3.1 Acquire office equipment 1 Lot Kumba 10.000.000 3.2 Paint the council chambers   Toko 3.000.000 3.3 Facilitate the functioning of Meangwe market 4 sensitization meetings All villages concerned 500.000 3.4 Develop standard operating procedures for the use of the council 4×4 pick vehicle and the tipper 1 meeting Toko 1.000.000 4. Collaboration with main stakeholders improved       4.1 Identify all council stakeholders 1 meeting Toko 200.000 4.2 Organize a forum with main stakeholders 1 Toko 1.000.000 4.3 Elaborate training opportunities for Toko municipality 1 meeting Toko 2.000.000 4.4 Involve stakeholders in planning, monitoring and evaluation of micro-projects 2 meetings yearly 8 Toko 4.000.000 Total     78.200.000         Table of Village Priority Projects (in key sectors) and Village Development Committees (VDC) in Toko Municipality. Below are the priority projects identified and ranked per village including the development committees that were either activated or constituted as at 30th November 2011. Three villages including Manya, Boromba and Lowe have less than five persons each who could not constitute a VDC. However, they have all the main needs including resettlement of the population that left several years ago. Their priorities have been grouped at the end of the table below. The Terms of Reference for the VDCs were clearly agreed upon to include: v  Work in close collaboration with the Council Development Agent to follow up projects v  Facilitate data collection and updating all development activities within the village v  Ensure a strict follow up of the local solutions calendar v  Assist the Chiefs and Traditional council to seek funds to implement the projects as well as maintain the high commitment and ownership level of the village. v  Negotiate with relevant resource persons in and out of the village for project implementation v  Implement the M&E plan: collect, analyze and document all monitoring and evaluation information. v  Remind respective village resource persons of the activities planned for them in each project v  Develop annual implementation plans v  Document the VDP implementation process and inform the villagers of the process and constraints and opportunities   No Village Micro Projects in Priority Village Development  Committee Members Sector Micro Project Name Position Occupation 1 Toko  Public Works Rehabilitate road network Maliba Elvis President Councilor Energy  Rehabilitate and extend thermal electricity plant Ogen Philip Secretary Farmer Water Rehabilitate and extend water scheme Esona Rosaline Financial Sec. House wife Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Mulango Jacobine Treasurer House wife Public Health Equip the health centre with essential drugs and equipment Maliba Edward Adviser 01 Farmer Commerce Equip market with lock up stores Mathias Penda Adviser 02 Farmer Arts & Culture Construction of a community hall for cultural manifestation Iquoh Sophie Adviser 03 House wife Basic Education Equipment and furniture in GS (pupil desks, table’s chairs for teachers)       Secondary Education Construction of four classrooms to GSS and supply of didactic materials       Forestry Plant trees and sensitize on aforestation       Livestock Provide high breed species to farmers         2 Madie 1 Public Works Rehabilitate road network Nesoah Martin President Farmer Energy  Rehabilitate and extend thermal electricity plant NgandaValantine Secretary Mayor Water Rehabilitate and extend water scheme MolikiThimoty Financial Secretary Farmer Public Health Supply of basic health equipment and drugs to health center Maurice Mekumba Treasurer Nurse Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Metoko Abel Adviser 01 Farmer Commerce Construct a modern permanent  market Elibe Jeremiah Adviser 02 Farmer Basic Education Equipment and furniture (pupil desks, table’s chairs for teachers)       Secondary Education Construction of four classrooms to GSS and supply of didactic materials       Culture Construct a community hall for cultural manifestations       Forestry Plant trees and sensitize on aforestation       Livestock Provide high breed species to farmers         3 Moboka Public Works Maintenance of existing road network and rehabilitation of culverts and bridges Nakeli Namoa President Farmer Energy Install thermal electricity Eboa Simon Secretary Farmer Water Install water scheme Moni Victor Financial Secretary Farmer Public Health Construction of a  health centre and   public toilets Mokele Samuel Treasurer Businessman Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers EkoiUrga Adviser 01 Housewife Commerce Construction of a modern permanent  market Ngomo Martin Adviser 02 Farmer Basic Education Construction of  8 classrooms to four GSs  and supply didactic materials Itie Oscar Adviser 03 Farmer Secondary Education Construction of four classrooms to GSS and supply of didactic materials       Forestry Plant trees and sensitize on aforestation       Livestock Provide high breed species to farmers       4 Dikome Ngolo Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network and construction of culverts/bridges Moses Nakomo President Farmer Water and Energy Supply  of a potable water scheme EffiongBevser Secretary Farmer   Install thermal electricity (3) OsiakaAsah Financial Secretary farmer Public Health  Rehabilitate health centre Madam Esube Treasurer Farmer Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Bonge Adviser 01 Farmer Commerce Construct modern  market EbotaNotuah Adviser 02 Farmer Basic Education Construction of 6 addition classrooms in GS Dikome, Mapanja and Dibonda John Diso Adviser 03 farmer Livestock Provide high breed species to farmers       5 Ngamoki 1 Water Install water scheme Nitwa Andreas President Farmer Energy Install thermal electricity Motia Kingsly Secretary Hunter Public Health Construction health center and equip   with basic essential  drugs  Okalome Daniel Financial Secretary farmer Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Isah Henry Treasurer Farmer Commerce Construct  market Bebore Samuel Adviser 01 Farmer   Joan Misori Adviser 02 Farmer John Epimba Adviser 03 farmer 6 Tombe Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network Eboka Paul President Farmer Water Install water schemes and form  functional management committee Sakwe Stephan Secretary Farmer Energy Install thermal  electricity plants (4) EbokaEmerencia Financial Secretary farmer  Public Health Construction of health centre and equip   with basic essential  drugs  Esemu Dorothy Treasurer Farmer Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Chief Ebeka Lucas Adviser 01 Farmer Commerce Construct modern  market Dipenda Joseph Adviser 02 Farmer  Basic Education Construction of 4 additional classrooms Dipenda Mathias Adviser 03 farmer 7 Nwamoki Water Install water scheme Oponde Simon President Farmer Energy Install thermal electricity Orume Richard Secretary Farmer Public Health Construction health center and equip   with basic essential  drugs  Ngoe David Financial Secretary farmer Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Sophie Black Treasurer Farmer Commerce Construct  market Morundu Linus Adviser 01 Farmer   Ojoh Patrick Adviser 02 Farmer Elemitah Esther Adviser 03 Housewife 8 Mapanja (Ngamoki 2) Water Install water scheme Mokongo Johnson President Teacher Energy Install thermal electricity Ebongo Collet Secretary Teacher Public Health Construction health center and equip   with basic essential  drugs  Elangwe Emmanuel Financial Secretary farmer Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Ambalo Paul Treasurer Farmer Commerce Construct  market Akotry George Adviser 01 Farmer     Helen Ekpe Adviser 02 Housewife     Mosongo Jonas Ngembeni Adviser 03 farmer 9 Meangwe 1  Public Works Rehabilitate road network Patric Ngime President Teacher Energy  Rehabilitate and extend thermal electricity plant Itabina Moses Secretary Contractor Water Rehabilitate and extend water scheme Nganda Austin Vice president Farmer Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Charles Mekume Treasurer Court manager Public Health Equip the health centre with essential drugs and equipment Nanya Banabas Member Retired teacher Commerce Equip market with lock up stores Ngomo Sylvanus Member Farmer Arts & Culture Construction of a community hall for cultural manifestation Aja Lawrence Adviser 03 Retired teacher Basic Education Equipment and furniture in GS (pupil desks, table’s chairs for teachers)       Forestry Plant trees and sensitize on aforestation       Livestock Provide high breed species to farmers         10 Iboko Public Works Rahabilitate existing road network Moki Joseph President Teacher Energy Install thermal electricity Eta Felix Secretary Nurse Water Construct a water scheme with gravity Esona Pius Financial Secretary farmer  Public Health Construct and equiped  health centre BeleBalemba Treasurer Teacher Culture Construct community hall for cultural manifestations Linus Balemba Adviser 01 Farmer   Dio Manfred Adviser 02 Farmer EkpeniNazereth Adviser 03 Nurse 11 Itali Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network OrumePaulinus President Farmer Water Supply of  pipe borne  water scheme by gravity Agbor Johnson Secretary Farmer Energy Install thermal electricity Penda Agnes Financial Secretary farmer Public Health  Rehabilitate health centre NatekeliMicheal Treasurer Farmer Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Penda George Adviser 01 Farmer Commerce Construct modern  market Makongo Henry Adviser 02 Farmer Culture Construct community hall for cultural manifestations Agbor Oliver Adviser 03 farmer 12 Bareka 1 Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network Obase Austine Out President Teacher Water Install water schemes and form  functional management committee Mokoe Felix Mokoe Secretary Farmer Energy Install thermal  electricity plant Njoke Charles Kobo Financial Secretary farmer Public Health Construction of health center Njoke Angelina B. Treasurer Housewife Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Esaw Raymond Adviser 01 Pensioner Basic Education Construction of 6 classrooms and equip with  teachers desk and didactic materials Angi Felix Adviser 02 Farmer Culture Construct  community hall for cultural manifestation, Chief Obase Jonas D. Adviser 03 farmer 13 Dibonda Mosina Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network and construction of culverts/bridges Masango Amos President Farmer Water Supply  of a potable water scheme Meriki Vincent Secretary Farmer Energy Install thermal electricity Anaman Bertha Mandesi Financial Secretary Housewife Public Health  Rehabilitate health centre Malle George Treasurer Farmer Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Chief Anamani Anthony Adviser 01 Farmer Commerce Construct modern  market Nayaba John Adviser 02 Pensioner Basic Education Construction of 4 addition classrooms in GS Nayaba Joan Adviser 03 Housewife Livestock Provide high breed species to farmers       14 Masaka Batanga Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network Motabo George Bekima President Farmer Water Install water scheme and form  functional management committee Motiti John Secretary Farmer Energy Install thermal  electricity plant Ekole Venus Financial Secretary farmer  Public Health Construction of health centre and equip   with basic essential  drugs  BolembaBenedicta Treasurer Farmer Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Chief Besong David Adviser 01 Farmer Commerce Construct modern  market Motoko Jonas Adviser 02 Farmer   Besong Sophie Adviser 03 farmer 15 Bombangi Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network Oponde Roland President Farmer Water Supply of  pipe borne  water scheme by gravity Moloko Simon Secretary Farmer Energy Install thermal electricity Nasamai Clifford Financial Secretary farmer Public Health  Rehabilitate health centre Ewang Mary Treasurer Housewife Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Chief Ebune Francis Adviser 01 Farmer Commerce Construct modern  market Obie Pius Adviser 02 Farmer Culture Construct community hall for cultural manifestations Ekoi Susan Adviser 03 Housewife 16 Ipongi Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network Motia Mathias Balemba President Farmer Water Supply of  pipe borne  water scheme by gravity Epelenga Michael Secretary Farmer Energy Install thermal electricity Aloliase Lawrence Financial Secretary farmer Public Health  Rehabilitate health centre Ekine Elizabeth Treasurer Farmer Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Chief Epelenga Manfred Adviser 01 Farmer Commerce Construct modern  market Asangi Alex Balemba Adviser 02 Farmer Culture Construct community hall for cultural manifestations Ekine Rebecca Adviser 03 farmer 17 Babiabanga Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network Nandori Linus President Farmer Water Supply of  pipe borne  water scheme by gravity Mokala Adolf Secretary Farmer Energy Install thermal electricity Songo Emilia Financial Secretary Housewife Public Health  Rehabilitate health centre AshumAsha Mary Treasurer Housewife Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Mekanya Robert S. Adviser 01 Chief/farmer Commerce Construct modern  market Songo Philip AshumAshu Adviser 02 Chief council Culture Construct community hall for cultural manifestations Ngoe Rachael Adviser 03 farmer 18 Lobe Batanga Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network Martin Nemba President Teacher Water Install water scheme and form  functional management committee Iselle Isaac Secretary Farmer Energy Install thermal  electricity plant Nerius Mosuma Financial Secretary farmer  Public Health Construction of health centre and equip   with basic essential  drugs  Nemba Comfort Treasurer Housewife Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Nemba Sunday Lobe Adviser 01 Chief/farmer Commerce Construct modern  market Mokete Alex Adviser 02 Farmer  Basic Education Construction of 4 additional classrooms Iselle Susan Adviser 03 Housewife 19 Bareka 2 Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network Okon Jackson President Farmer Water Install water scheme and form  functional management committee Moluako Charles Secretary Farmer Energy Install thermal  electricity plant Komba Philip Financial Secretary farmer Public Health Construction of health center Mobele Elizabeth Treasurer housewife Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Ebebe Noah Oponde Adviser 01 Chief/farmer Basic Education Construction of 2 classrooms and equip with  teachers desk and didactic materials KombaZachaia Adviser 02 Chief/council Culture Construct  community hall for cultural manifestation, Lobe Martha Adviser 03 Housewife 20 Madie New Town Public Works Rehabilitate road network Edward Disonge Obie President Businessman Energy  Rehabilitate and extend thermal electricity plant Ndiba William Secretary Journalist Water Rehabilitate and extend water scheme EsemeMicheal Financial Secretary Teacher Public Health Supply of basic health equipment and drugs to health center Mbongi Angela Treasurer Businesswoman Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Dienge Adviser 01 Businessman Commerce Construct a modern permanent  market Obie Stephan Adviser 02 Civil  army Basic Education Equipment and furniture (pupil desks, table’s chairs for teachers) EpimbeMokala Adviser 03 farmer Secondary Education Construction of four classrooms to GSS and supply of didactic materials       Culture Construct a community hall for cultural manifestations       Forestry Plant trees and sensitize on aforestation       Livestock Provide high breed species to farmers         21 Madie Boembe Public Works Rehabilitate road network Moki Suffer Meboka President Farmer Energy  Rehabilitate and extend thermal electricity plant Moki Pascal Eboka Secretary Applicant Water Rehabilitate and extend water scheme Moki Abraham Financial Secretary farmer Public Health Supply of basic health equipment and drugs to health center Itoe Elizabeth Treasurer Housewife Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers MayouaJenet Adviser 01 Housewife Commerce Construct a modern permanent  market DikuruLoveline Adviser 02 Housewife Basic Education Equipment and furniture (pupil desks, table’s chairs for teachers)       Secondary Education Construction of four classrooms to GSS and supply of didactic materials       Culture Construct a community hall for cultural manifestations       Forestry Plant trees and sensitize on aforestation       Livestock Provide high breed species to farmers       22 Banyo Public Works Rehabilitate road network Molioh Benard President Farmer Energy Install thermal electricity plant Meyango Victor Secretary Farmer Water Install water scheme Diwala William Eyoh Financial Secretary Farmer  Public Health Construct and equip  health centre Moleba Mbenda Treasurer farmer Basic Education Rehabilitation of classrooms and supply of didactic materials Chief Ogen M. Adviser 01 Farmer Secondary Education Provide Technical College (GTC) Moleka Mathias Adviser 02 Farmer Employment & VocationalTraining Construct and equip SAR SM and make functional DiwolaElen Adviser 03 Farmer 23 Iwasa Public Works Rahabilitate existing road network Mukete Emmanuel President Teacher Energy Install thermal electricity Meboka Daniel Secretary Farmer Water Construct a water scheme with gravity HellenNakeli Financial Secretary farmer  Public Health Construct and equiped  health centre EbukuMargrat Treasurer Farmer Culture Construct community hall for cultural manifestations Ochoe Thomas Adviser 01 Farmer 24 Kile Kile Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network Chief Solomon Ndoka President Chief Water Supply of  pipe borne  water scheme by gravity Songo Julius Secretary Teacher Energy Install thermal electricity Cecilia Kosa Financial Secretary Housewife Public Health  Rehabilitate health centre Mboka Alice Treasurer Teacher Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Bisingi Edward Adviser 01 Farmer Commerce Construct modern  market Oponde Daniel Adviser 02 Farmer Culture Construct community hall for cultural manifestations Sakwe Johas Adviser 03 farmer Forestry Plant trees and sensitize on aforestation       Livestock Provide high breed species to farmers         25 Iyombo Public Works Rahabilitate existing road network Pius Nangia President Farmer Energy Install thermal electricity Felix Motia Secretary Farmer Water Construct a water scheme with gravity Alfred Dibo Financial Secretary farmer  Public Health Construct and equiped  health centre Linus Elangwe Treasurer Farmer Culture Construct community hall for cultural manifestations Jacob Neba Adviser 01 Farmer     Johnson Ngolo Adviser 02 Farmer 26 Dienge Public Works Rahabilitate existing road network Esobo Daniel President Farmer Energy Install thermal electricity Epie Felix Secretary Farmer Water Construct a water scheme with gravity Oponde Patricia Financial Secretary farmer  Public Health Construct and equiped  health centre Eboka Smith Treasurer Farmer Culture Construct community hall for cultural manifestations Bisingi Ben Adviser 01 Farmer   Ekabe Sophie Adviser 02 Farmer Esobo Sabina Adviser 03 farmer 27 Illondo Public Works Maintenance of existing road network and rehabilitation of culverts and bridges Ekale Riles President Farmer Energy Install thermal electricity Osake Cosmos Secretary Farmer Water Install water scheme Peter Ebone Financial Secretary farmer Public Health Construction of a  health centre and   public toilets Elizabeth Ebone Treasurer Farmer Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Anastasia Ikoe Adviser 01 Farmer Commerce Construction of a modern permanent  market Osaka Elizabeth Adviser 02 Farmer Basic Education Construction of  8 classrooms to four GSs  and supply didactic materials       Forestry Plant trees and sensitize on aforestation       Livestock Provide high breed species to farmers       28 Mobenge Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network Musango Michael President Farmer Water Supply of  pipe borne  water scheme by gravity Ekoli Mercy Secretary Farmer Energy Install thermal electricity Ebune Paul Financial Secretary Pastor (PCC) Public Health  Rehabilitate health centre Ekole Gilbert Treasurer Fascilitayors Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Nombo Margaret Adviser 01 Housewife Commerce Construct modern  market Ekota Comfort Adviser 02 Housewife Culture Construct community hall for cultural manifestations       Forestry Plant trees and sensitize on aforestation       Livestock Provide high breed species to farmers         29 Lipenja Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network Mbamene Javis President Electrician Energy Install thermal electricity plants Bamobe Cecilia I. Secretary Teacher Water Install water scheme Moleke Elvis E. Financial Secretary Graduate Public Health Rehabilitate  and equip  health centre EpakaJosophine Treasurer Housewife Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Chief Epaka Johnson Adviser 01 Farmer Basic Education Construction of additional 3 classrooms and supply with teacher desks       Culture Construct a community hall for cultural manifestations       Commerce Construct modern  market       30 Mofako Public Works Maintenance of existing road network and rehabilitation of culverts and bridges Tute Paus President Farmer Energy Install thermal electricity Ikose Felix Secretary Farmer Water Install water scheme Anamani Nelson Financial Secretary farmer Public Health Construction of a  health centre and   public toilets OsakeEnerst Treasurer Farmer Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Meriki Black Adviser 01 Farmer Commerce Construction of a modern permanent  market Massango Joseph Adviser 02 Farmer Basic Education Construction of  4 classrooms to four GSs  and supply didactic materials Osake Mathew Adviser 03 farmer Forestry Plant trees and sensitize on aforestation       Livestock Provide high breed species to farmers       31 Ikoi Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network John Anamity President Farming Water Install water scheme and form  functional management committee Mitongo David Secretary Businessman Energy Install thermal  electricity plant Belo Felix Financial Secretary Applicant Public Health Construction of health center Mukete Francis Treasurer Farming Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Ndingi Mathias Adviser 01 Farmer Basic Education Construction of 2 classrooms and equip with  teachers desk and didactic materials       Culture Construct  community hall for cultural manifestation,       32 Bokuba Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network Chief Echoe Thomas President Council Staff Water Install water scheme and form  functional management committee Mr. Divine Moto Secretary Farmer Energy Install thermal  electricity plant Mr. Godwin Itoe Financial Secretary Farmer Public Health Construction of health center Mrs. Cecil Ekoe Treasurer Farmer Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Mrs. Rose Besingi Adviser Farmer Basic Education Construction of 2 classrooms and equip with  teachers desk and didactic materials Mrs. Ebune Susan B. Member Farmer Culture Construct  community hall for cultural manifestation, Marie Osake Member Farmer 33 Bonabeanga  Public Work Rehabilitate road network Samson Ekpe President Farmer Energy  Rehabilitate and extend thermal electricity plant Jerine Besumbu Secretary Housewife Water Rehabilitate and extend water scheme Esomba Cecelia Financial Secretary Applicant Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Veronica Makumba Treasurer Housewife Public Health Equip the health centre with essential drugs and equipment Elemita Monica Adviser 01 Housewife Commerce Equip market with lock up stores Okpomiseh Chanel Adviser 02 Applicant Arts & Culture Construction of a community hall for cultural manifestation Sumbe Julie Adviser 03 Housewife Basic Education Equipment and furniture in GS (pupil desks, table’s chairs for teachers)       Forestry Plant trees and sensitize on aforestation       Livestock Provide high breed species to farmers         34 Bweme  Public Works Rehabilitate road network Makongo Joseph Monyangi President chief Energy  Rehabilitate and extend thermal electricity plant Mawba John Isele Secretary Farmer Water Rehabilitate and extend water scheme Mbutu Victor Financial Secretary Farmer Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Comfort moyengi Treasurer Farmer Public Health Equip the health centre with essential drugs and equipment Olivia Mbeli Adviser 01 Farmer Commerce Equip market with lock up stores Frida Sakwe Adviser 02 Farmer Arts & Culture Construction of a community hall for cultural manifestation Frida Isange Adviser 03 Farmer Basic Education Equipment and furniture in GS (pupil desks, table’s chairs for teachers)       Forestry Plant trees and sensitize on aforestation       Livestock Provide high breed species to farmers         35 Iyoe Public Works Maintenance of existing road network and rehabilitation of culverts and bridges Nalenya ZacNdo President Farming Energy Install thermal electricity Mekenya Linus Secretary Farmer Water Install water scheme Nche Manfred Oke Financial Sec farming Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Oke Abraham Adviser 01 Farmer Commerce Construction of a modern permanent  market Moli David Itabina Adviser 02 Farmer Basic Education Construction of  8 classrooms to four GSs  and supply didactic materials Youngweh Agnes Adviser 03 farmer Forestry Plant trees and sensitize on aforestation       Livestock Provide high breed species to farmers       36 Ndoi Public Works Maintenance of existing road network and rehabilitation of culverts and bridges  Chief Regent President Farming Energy Install thermal electricity Mr. Agbor Simon Secretary Farmer Water Install water scheme Ndoh Edward D. Financial Sec farming Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Mr. Awoh Zach. Adviser 01 Farmer Commerce Construction of a modern permanent  market Mr. Agbor Paul Adviser 02 farmer Basic Education Construction of  8 classrooms to four GSs  and supply didactic materials       Forestry Plant trees and sensitize on aforestation       Livestock Provide high breed species to farmers       37 Basari Public Works Maintenance of existing road network and rehabilitation of culverts and bridges Obase Augustine Otu President Farming Energy Install thermal electricity Nganda Samuel Secretary Farmer Water Install water scheme Epie Rosaline Financial Sec farming Public Health Construction of a  health centre and   public toilets Iselle Rudolf Treasurer Farmer Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Orume Patricia Adviser 01 Farmer Commerce Construction of a modern permanent  market Obase Mathew Adviser 02 Farmer Basic Education Construction of  8 classrooms to four GSs  and supply didactic materials       Forestry Plant trees and sensitize on aforestation       Livestock Provide high breed species to farmers       38 Esukotan Public Works Rehabilitate road network Awoh Zacharia President Farming Energy Install 3 thermal electricity plants Ndoh Edward Secretary Farmer Water Install 3 water schemes Nwese Samson Financial Sec farming  Public Health Construct and equip  health centre (2) Agbor Sanson Treasurer Farmer Basic Education Rehabilitation of classrooms and supply of didactic materials Effim Peter Adviser 01 Farmer Secondary Education Provide Technical College (GTC) Besinga Gladys Adviser 02 Farmer Employment & VocationalTraining Construct and equip SAR SM and make functional Moki Emilia Adviser 03 farmer 39 Ikenge Public Works, Water and Energy Rehabilitate road network Asito Samuel President Farming   Install 3 thermal electricity plants Oke Abraham Secretary Farmer   Install 3 water schemes Nemba Thomas Financial Sec farming  Public Health Construct and equip  health centre (2) Oben Elibe Treasurer Farmer Basic Education Rehabilitation of classrooms and supply of didactic materials David Mboka Adviser 01 Farmer Secondary Education Provide Technical College (GTC) Nalenya Zacheus Adviser 02 Farmer Employment & VocationalTraining Construct and equip SAR SM and make functional Elibe Sophina Adviser 03 farmer 40 Basari Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network Monyana Eric President Farming Water Install water schemesand form  functional management committee Epie Julie Maery Secretary Farmer Energy Install thermal  electricity plant Balemba Cletus Financial Sec farming Public Health Construction of health center Nbute Stephen Treasurer Farmer Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Mama Sophra Bi Adviser 01 Farmer Basic Education Construction of 6 classrooms and equip with  teachers desk and didactic materials Moki Roger Adviser 02 Farmer Culture Construct  community hall for cultural manifestation,       41 Ikoti 1 Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network Itoe Franklin President Farming Energy Install 3 thermal electricity plants Motanda Johnson Secretary Farmer Water Install water scheme Mr. Moki Samon Financial Sec farming Public Health Rehabilitate  and equip  health centre Ndingi Patrick Treasurer Farmer Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Kondo James Adviser 01 Farmer Basic Education Construction of additional 3 classrooms and supply with teacher desks       Culture Construct a community hall for cultural manifestations       Commerce Construct modern  market       42 Ikoti 2 Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network Cistus Oku President Farming Energy Install 3 thermal electricity plants Moki Anthony Secretary Farmer Water Install water scheme Songo Dennis Financial Sec farming Public Health Rehabilitate  and equip  health centre Okpa Dilonge Treasurer Farmer Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Kosah Samuel Adviser 01 Farmer Basic Education Construction of additional 3 classrooms and supply with teacher desks Balentine Sango Adviser 02 Farmer Culture Construct a community hall for cultural manifestations       Commerce Construct modern  market       43 Betika Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network Ngoe Fredrick President Farming Water Install water scheme and form  functional management committee Bosani Adolf Secretary Farmer Energy Install thermal  electricity plant Naikoh Sunday Financial Secretary farming Public Health Construction of health center Besaka Alice Treasurer Farmer Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Robert Nibo Adviser 01 Farmer Basic Education Construction of 6 classrooms and equip with  teachers desk and didactic materials       Culture Construct  community halls for cultural manifestation,       44 Esoki Public Works Maintenance of existing road network and rehabilitation of culverts and bridges Njoke Charles President Farming Energy Install thermal electricity Opaki Sophie Secretary Farmer Water Install water scheme Epie Christopher Financial Sec farming Public Health Construction of a  health centre and   public toilets Asaguo Angelina Treasurer Farmer Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Mekambe Irene Adviser 01 Farmer Commerce Construction of a modern permanent  market Ngoe Daniel Adviser 02 Farmer Basic Education Construction of  8 classrooms to four GSs  and supply didactic materials Oke Micheal Adviser 03 farmer Forestry Plant trees and sensitize on aforestation       Livestock Provide high breed species to farmers       45 Dobonda Kokori Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network and construction of culverts/bridges Esaw Stephen President Farming Water Supply  of a potable water scheme Djemo Pamela Secretary Farmer Energy Install thermal electricity Epingi Frida Financial Sec farming Public Health  Rehabilitate health centre Sanje Divine Treasurer Farmer Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Opaki Susan Adviser 01 Farmer Commerce Construct modern  market Mindako Abel Adviser 02 Farmer Basic Education Construction of 6 addition classrooms in GS Dikome, Mapanja and Dibonda Mokio Felix Adviser 03 farmer Livestock Provide high breed species to farmers       46 Mayeka Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network Chief Maloko Jonas President Farming     Water Install water scheme and form  functional management committee Paul Mbote Secretary Farmer     Energy Install thermal  electricity plant Ndoh Patrick Financial Secretary farming      Public Health Construction of health centre and equip   with basic essential  drugs  Masongo Stephen Treasurer Farmer     Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Ndoh Helen Adviser 01 Farmer     Commerce Construct modern  market Masongo Cornelius Adviser 02 Farmer      Basic Education Construction of 4 additional classrooms Nabangi Mesoro Adviser 03 farmer     .           Villages 47, 48, 49 (Manya, Boromba and Lowe)  have priority projects to resettle and rehabilitate their population which escaped to neighboring villages several years ago.. After resettlement, their needs will center around the key sectors including: Public Works, Energy, Water, Public Health, Agriculture, Commerce, Basic Education, Forestry and Livestock

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Participatory Diagnosis village by village and sector by sector within Toko Municipality were facilitated by resource persons of the Municipal Development Counselling (MUDEC) Group under the general supervision of the Team Leader. MUDEC Group,( the Local Support Organization)..

NAME QUALIFICATION CONTACT
CHARLIE MBONTEH.Team Leader.MUDEC Group, Buea. MBA MarketingRUTGERS University, USA (237) 77 64 94 30 / 94 34 43 52mudecgroup@yahoo.commudecgroup@gmail.comwww.mudecgroup.org

 

 


MUDEC & PNDP collabration(Kombo Intindi Council)

Kombo Intindi Council (KIC)


Final Report on the Communal Development Planning Process in Kombo Itindi Municipality.

 

Prepared by LSO MUDEC Group.

Submitted to the RCU/PNDP/SW.

November 2012

  1. 1.     Introduction
  2. a.     Context and justification

In July 2004 the Government of Cameroon in enacted the Law on Decentralization as Applicable to Local Councils. This law among others  mandates councils to provide basic services in several domains including economic, social, health, education, and culture and sports development within their municipalities. The Government has since fostered the process through other instruments such as the Growth and Employment Strategy Paper (GESP), and Vision 2035 which are geared at making the country an emergent economy with 10% annual growth rate. Councils have since 2010 been receiving resources and competencies from the central authorities.

Further to all these efforts, the National Community Driven Development Programme (PNDP) has been commissioned to contribute meaningfully toward poverty alleviation using participatory strategies at the level of local councils. Within the framework for the execution of PNDP activities, a cooperation agreement was signed in July 2011 between Kombo Itindi Council, the PNDP (SW-RCU) and MUDEC Group (a Local Support Organization) in which the PNDP has offered technical and financial support to enable MUDEC Group accompany Kombo Itindi Council toward the elaboration of its Communal Development Plan (CDP).

  1. b.    Objective of the CDP

The overall objective was to equip the council with a Communal Development Plan.

Specific Objectives include to;  

  • Sensitize all development stakeholders within the municipality to encourage participation and ownership of the planning process.
  • Conduct participatory  identification, analysis and documentation of information  at the council level (CID), urban level (USD), and village level (consolidated village diagnosis).
  • Accompany consultants during the conduct of feasibility studies and institute Follow up Committees at council and village levels to monitor the implementation of micro projects.
  • Build partnership and resources (financial, material, human) between the council and its development stakeholders.

        2. Methodology: this can be analyzed at three levels;

  •  Secondary data was collected through literature reviews on socio economic, cultural, environmental, financial, material and personnel matters.
  • Primary data was collected and analyzed using a variety of Participatory Rural Appraisal (PRA) tools with gender considerations including participatory mapping, socio economic and environmental surveys and meetings with socio professional group representatives. Participants also engaged in direct observations, site visits, focus group discussions, interviews with questionnaires, transect walks, simple ranking, produced venn diagrams, and problem analysis using problem and objective trees. Waypoints were collected using the Global Positioning System (GPS). Historical timeline were used to assist participants to identify previous development efforts and their partners.
  • Facilitators used statistical software for data entry which enabled the differentiation and presentation of qualitative and quantitative analysis to generate tables, graphs, pie charts and bar charts.. GIS software was used for the production of geo referenced maps.
  1. 3.      Activities: several activities were executed during this planning process and can be subdivided into three introductory, facilitation and validation phases as follows:

Introduction phase:

v   LSO key personnel trained by officials of the PNDP.

v  Contract signed between the council (represented by the Mayor), the LSO (represented by its Team Leader) and  the South West Regional Coordinator of the PNDP.

v  Training resituated to other MUDEC research assistants.

v  Planning meetings held with the management of Kombo Itindi council.

v    Secondary data on the socio economic and environmental situation within the municipality collected and triangulated.

v  Elaborated sensitization campaigns of stakeholders including traditional authorities, women and youth group representatives, the local administrative heads of technical services, socio professional groups and international organizations operating within the municipality.

 Facilitation phase: This included;

v  Official launching workshop organized.

v  Steering Committee put in place with clearly defined terms of reference.

v  Primary data collected and diagnosed at three different levels namely; the Council Institutional Diagnosis (CID), the Urban Space Diagnosis (USD) and the Sectorial Village by Village Diagnosis.

v  Data Consolidation and Mapping.

v  Planning Workshop, Resource Mobilization and Programming. During this workshop several activities were carried out including; restitution of  the diagnosis report by sector and by village ; restitution of the Logical Framework sector by sector; programming  and  prioritisation of investments for the Mid Term Expenditure Tramework (2-12 to 2014) and the Annual Investment Plan (2012) ; evaluation of  the environmental strategy of the AIP.  putting in place the Follow up Committee with clear terms of reference with an action plan; elaboration of a contract award plan for the first year (2012).

Validation phase:  This involved;

  • Accompaniment of consultants during the conduct of feasibility studies
  • Identification of Village Project Committees
  • Validation of Micro projects by COMES.
  1. 4.      Results: the following results were realized within the municipality;
    1. Communal Development Plan
    2. Consolidated Diagnosis Report
    3. Global Positioning System (way points)
    4. Consolidate Excel Sheets
    5. Consolidated Excel Sheets of  Needs
    6. Atlas of Maps and Pictures
    7. Implantation of a Monitoring Committee at the level of the council.
    8. Implantation of Project Management Committees at Village levels
  1. 5.     Difficulties encountered:

Challenges encountered during the execution of the project centered at four levels namely;

a)      Council level:

i)                    Unavailable secondary about the council even at the level of the supervisory authority.

ii)                  Available information can only be secured from the Mayor who generally was too busy with other council matters.

iii)                The Sub Treasurer was not versed with the Council PNDP operations thus increasing the bottlenecks on planned activities.

b)     Community level:

i)                    Some Councilors of the municipality took a nonchalant approach toward the planning exercise.

ii)                  The terrain was horrible and difficult for the conduct of planning activities..

c)      PNDP level:

i)                    Slow and cumbersome payments of contract values tremendously put undue strain on field operations.

ii)                  Planning process organized during the rainy season when insecurity in maritime areas is high. Timing for data collection during the rains caused working documents to be wet thereby increasing risks of losing data collected.

d)     MUDEC Level:

i)                    Uncommitted staff who did not respect PNDP methodology were suspended thereby causing delays as some activities had to be executed twice.

  1. 6.     Conclusion:

The process to elaborate the CDP of KIC was successful because the main objective was realized. The entire process was challenging because it was participatory with sometimes conflicting viewpoints. It can be effectively appreciated when one looks at the actors and tools at each stage within the process, the timing, the challenges encountered and the way forward.. The level of understanding of stakeholders also added to the challenges as planners had to speak through interpreters with the risk of information being distorted. The timing of the process was problematic because data was collected during the heart of the rainy season with violent sea waves that put immense strain on the research assistants. Due to insecurity within the municipality, researchers were accompanied by BIR elements who were constantly putting pressure on the data collection activities by hurrying to return to their bases because they were not well informed on the need for patience when communicating with villagers. Finally, the collaboration between the main actors in the CDP elaboration process (the council, PNDP, communities, consultants and the LSO) was relatively cordial largely due to the fact that the roles and responsibilities of each were clearly spelt out and constantly being reviewed.

 

 

Report on the Process of Accompanying Consultants during the Conduct of Feasibility Studies in

Kombo Itindi Municipality

Prepared by LSO MUDEC Group.

Submitted to the RCU/PNDP/SW.

Submitted on 8th November 2012.

 

  1. 1.     Introduction:

1.1             Context and justification:

The National Community Driven Development Programme (PNDP) was commissioned to contribute meaningfully toward poverty alleviation using participatory strategies at the level of local councils. Within this framework,  a cooperation agreement was signed in July 2011 between Kombo Itindi Council, the PNDP (SW-RCU) and MUDEC Group (a Local Support Organization) in which the PNDP  offered technical and financial support to enable MUDEC Group facilitate  the elaboration of a Communal Development Plan (CDP) for Kombo Itindi municipality. During the planning exercise, several micro projects within several sectors  were identified in all the thirty two villages that constitute the council area. The total cost of the Communal Development Plan (CDP) for Kombo Itindi Municipality is three thousand four hundred seventy four million, three hundred thousand francs (3.474. 300.000 FCFA) while the Mid Term Expenditure Framework (MITEF 2012 to 2014) is  two thousand one hundred ninety seven million one hundred and sixty thousand francs (2.197.160.000 FCFA)

In the 2012 Annual Investment Plan, twenty (20) projects (in the domains of infrastructure, services and supplies) worth about five hundred and thirteen million (513, 000,000FCFA) were identified for execution. However, based on the available resources, only six projects (representing  30% ) were shortlisted for feasibility studies. These included provision of potable water in three villages (Barracks, Isu and Gold Coast), construction of classrooms and latrines at Government Primary Schools in Isu and Gold Coast and the construction of a fish dryer and warehouse in Barracks. In order to assure a smooth transition betwwen the planning process facilitation and the implementation of micro projects, the Local Support Organization / LSO (MUDEC Group) was required to accompany the consultants who were engaged to carry out fesibility studies. It is within this mind frame that the hydrualics and infrastructure consultants (repectively Professor Richard Akoachere and Mr. John Tendong)  were accompanied by MUDEC Group, Kombo Itindi Council officials, the PNDP  to the concerned villages from 30th May to 1st June 2012 to conduct feasibility studies for the six earmarked projects. The Supervisory Authority provided armed security (marines) to ensure the safety of the team during field operations. During field operations villages were sensitized and information, collected and village project committees formed. An enlarged council session was constituted to deliberate and validate the feasibility studies. Five micro projects were retained for execution and the neccessary contribution by PNDP and the Council determined. Council management was therefore authoried through a municipal decision to initiate the process of awarding contracts for the realization of the five retained micro projects.

 

1.2             Objective of the Accompaniment:

The main objective for the the LSO to accompany the consultants was to foster the participatory process in the field by linking up the all development stakeholders in identified communities and the consultants who had been charged to conduct the feasibility studies.

Specifically, the accompanying the consultants was to;  

  • To provide an enabling environment for the consultants to appreciate the Communal Development Plan of Kombo Itindi Council.
  • To introduce the consultants to the identified communities.
  • To sensitize all development stakeholders within the communities and encourage participation and ownership of the process of implementation of micro projects.
  • Facilitate the creation of  a Village Project Committee to monitor the implementation of micro projects.

2       Methodology:

The methodology included four phases:

2.1             Preparation:

The LSO made initial contacts with the hydraulics and infrastructure consultants soon after they had been contracted to carry out the studies. The CDP was circulated to them and after a period of review; a pre field work meeting was held during which there was brainstorming on possible dates which were communicated to council authorities as well as plans to mobilize human, material and financial resources. The team also solicited security coverage during the trip from the supervisory authority through the management of the council.

2.2             Field work:

Upon arrival in the council area, we held entry level discussions with council management and communicated the work plan to the concerned communities (Barracks, Isu and Gold Coast). During village visits, the LSO introduced the consultants to the Chiefs and the population who later explained their tasks, the proposed action plans and the nature of collaboration from the population. After brief question and answer sessions, Village Project Committees were constituted with clearly defined and understood terms of references in Barracks, Isu and Gold Coast (see annex). The project sites were later identified and the consultants collected and analyzed data. Their findings were presented to the villagers during exit level discussions.

2.3             Reporting:

The consultants and LSO proceeded to document their finding based on PNDP prescriptions which were submitted to technical experts of PNDP for approval. Thereafter, the team advised council management to constitute the COMES for the validation of the feasibility studies.

2.4             Validation of Feasibility Studies:

After the approval of the technical specifications of the studies, discussions were held on possible dates for validation. Council management proceeded to engage the validation on 25th October 2012 in Mundemba during which five projects were validated for execution..

3       Activities:

3.1             Introduction: The activities involved during this accompanying exercise centered on creating enabling environments for all stakeholders to come together and jointly execute their required tasks.

3.2             Facilitation/ Negotiation / Management of Conflicts: In order to  get the

Different stakeholders to work positively toward the desired objectives, there was need for  the LSO to play a facilitating role which sometimes was extremely difficult because of conflicting interests in terms of  dates, time and  venues for planned activities.  Conflicts also surfaced on issues such as joint financing of transportation especially on maritime routes.  Facilitation and negotiation were needed during site identification, the commitments of the population and selection of projects to be validated. In these situations the LSO was instrumental in negotiations which in most cases ended in win -win situations. A major conflict also centered on the proposed construction of a fish dryer and warehouse in Barracks worth thirty seven million seven hundred and eighty two thousand francs (37.782.000FCFA in which the council was to contribute of 15% or 5.667.300 FCFA . A few councilors thought it was important since it will create employment and generate income for the council. However, the lack of finance meant that the project was shelved for 2013. This represented another conflict management situation that was skillfully handled by the LSO.

3.3             Validation: This exercise took place on 25th October 2012 at the MINEPAT hall in Mundemba. About thirty five (35) participants constituting  the Enlarged Council Session (COMES) validated five (5) out of the six (6) micro projects presented by the consultants in the domains of hydraulics and infrastructure.

4       Results:

v  Village Project Committees created  in Barracks, Isu and Gold Coast.

v  Six (6) micro projects were studied and requests for financing submitted for five (5) micro projects.      

v  Five (5) micro projects were validated for financing and execution within four months..

v  Amounts  of contributions for the Council and the  PNDP listed below:

Name / Location of Micro Project Total Costs (TTC) PNDP Contribution / % Council Contribution / %
Purchase and Installation of Desalination Unit for  Water in Isu Village 43.679.776FCFA 41.495.787 FCFA (95%) 2.183.988 FCFA (5%)
Purchase and Installation of Desalination Unit for  Water in Gold Coast 43.679.776FCFA 41.495.787 FCFA (95%) 2.183.988 FCFA (5%)
Purchase and Installation of Desalination Unit for  Water in Barracks 43.679.776FCFA 41.495.787 FCFA (95%) 2.183.988 FCFA (5%)
Construction of 2 classrooms and litrines at GPS Isu. 38.218.460 FCFA 34.396.614 FCFA (90%) 3.821.846 FCFA (10%)
Construction of 2 classrooms and litrines at GPS Isu. 32.742.663 FCFA 29.468.396 FCFA (90%) 3.274.263 FCFA (10%)
Total 2012 Investments 202.000.451 FCFA 188.352.371 FCFA 13.648.073 FCFA

 

5        Difficulties encountered: We encountered several challenges during the exercise to accompany the consultants.. These were centered on three main areas; maritime transportation which is very expensive, usually not readily available and must be arranged in advance with financial commitments. Another major challenge is the terrain which is always wet, marshy and full of mosquitoes. The problem of insecurity is a constant reminder of the dangers of working in the Bakassi zone reasons why we requested armed security coverage.  

6       Conclusion:

The process to accompany the consultants during the conduct of feasibility studies was necessary because it created a link and continuity between the planning and the implementation phases of the elaboration of the CDP. It offered the consultants with ideas on field realities and background information upon which to plan their work. The process also gave opportunities for the council and villagers to easily work with the consultants by building on the rapport that had been created by the LSO. After preparatory activities, six micro projects in three villages (Barracks, Isu and Gold Coast) were shortlisted for study. These villages have project management committees who have been trained to work closely with the follow up committee at the level of the council. Five projects ( 3 in water and 2 in basic education) worth two hundred and two million four hundred and fifty one francs (202.000.451 FCFA) were deliberated and validated by the COMES for financing through the joint PNDP / KIC account. The council will make a contribution of thirteen million six hundred and forty eight thousand seventy three francs (13.648.073 FCFA) representing 6.8% while the PNDP will contribute one hundred eighty eight million three hundred fifty two thousand three hundred and seventy one francs (188.352.371 FCFA) representing 93.2%.

The next step in the implementation phase will be to mobilize the funds into the joint account and award contracts for effective construction to begin.  The upcoming dry season should be exploited to avoid cost overruns and security concerns during the rainy season.

The collaboration between the LSO, the consultants and council management was very cordial during this phase. PNDP representatives gave valuable and timely advice. It is now the duty of the council to hasten deposit of its share into the account and request funds from the PNDP in order that contractors are solicited to begin effective work.

7       Annexes

7.1            Municipal Decision Validating Feasibility Studies

7.2            Land Donation Agreements

7.3            Plan of Action / Realization

7.4            Village Project Committees

7.5            Micro Project Profiles

7.6            Pictures of the Sites / Validation Workshop

7.7            Attendance Sheets.

 

7.3 Action Plan / Realization:

No Planned Activity Dates Team members Outcomes
1 Hold introductory discussions with KIC, Consultants and LSO 23rd April 2012 KIC, Consultants and LSO Familiarity created, work time tables elaborated
2 Submit CDPs to Consultants 23rd April 2012 KIC, Consultants and LSO Consultants knowledge of the terrain and challenges clearly understood
3 Field visit to Barracks 30th May 2012 KIC, PNDP, Consultants and LSO Consultants introduced, project sites identified, land transfer agreements secured, information collected, village project committees created
4 Field visit to Isu 31st May 2012 KIC, PNDP, Consultants and LSO Consultants introduced, project sites identified, land transfer agreements secured, information collected, village project committees created
5 Field visit to Gold Coast 1st June 2012 KIC, PNDP, Consultants and LSO Consultants introduced, project sites identified, land transfer agreements secured, information collected, village project committees created
6 Reporting June to September 2012 Consultants, LSO Technical drafts produced and validated
7 Plan for Validation 20th October 2012 KIC, PNDP, Consultants and LSO Time table of dates, venue and participants produced.
8 Validation by COMES 25th October 2012 KIC, PNDP, Consultants and LSO Municipal Decision bearing on execution of micro projects available

 

7.4 Village Project Committees:

Village Names Position
Isu Chief Sunday Edet  Ndem President
  Frida Edet Anwana Vice President
  Costly John Edet Secretary
  Alex Edem Ekpenyong Vice Secretary
  Nkoyo Alex Treasurer
  Ekaette Effiong Bassey Vice Treasurer
  Effiong Bassey Etim Auditor
  Edet Etim Expo Vice Auditor
  Emmanuel Bullet Adviser 01
  Asuquo Inyang Udoh Adviser 02
Gold Coast Chief Young Authority President
  Mr. Anthony Okon Vice President
  Mr. Mission Nweke Secretary
  Dickson Dickson Usake Vice Secretary
  Mrs. Eno Dominic Treasurer
  Mrs. Love Oweikebi Vice Treasurer
  Mr. Sitorurbi Claudius Auditor
  Mr. Solomon Bassey Vice Auditor