Municipal Development Counselling (MUDEC) Group .:: MUDEC GROUP ::.
  • Our Mission

    • Reducing poverty in our municipalities through encouraging gender equality and increasing citizen (End User) participation in democratic and governance processes.

MUDEC & PNDP collabration (Toko Council)

 

REPUBLIC OF CAMEROON

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Peace – Work – Fatherland

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MINISTRY OF ECONOMY, PLANNING AND REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT

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GENERAL SECRETARY

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NATIONAL COMMUNITY DRIVEN DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

———-

 

SOUTHWEST REGIONAL COORDINATION UNIT

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REPUBLIQUE DU CAMEROUN

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Paix – Travail – Patrie

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MINISTERE DE L’ECONOMIE, DE LA PLANIFICATION ET DE L’AMENAGEMENT DU TERRITOIRE

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SECRETARIAT GENERAL

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PROGRAMME NATIONAL DE DEVELOPPEMENT PARTICIPATIF

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CELLULE REGIONALE DE COORDINATION DE SUD OUEST

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CONSOLIDATED DIAGNOSIS REPORT

 COMMUNAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN FOR TOKO COUNCIL

 

PREPARED BY: MUDEC Group, Buea.

                               South-West Region.

 

SUBMITTED TO: PNDP Regional Coordination Unit (RCU) Buea,

                                South West Region

November, 2011

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS
   
Title Pages
Table of Contents ii
List of Abbreviations iii
List of Tables iv
List of  Figures and Maps iv
Executive Summary v
1. 0.     INTRODUCTION 1
1.1.      Context and Justification 1
1.2.      Participatory Diagnosis Objectives 2
1.3.      Structure of the Document 2
2. 0.     METHODOLOGY 3
2.1.      Preparation of the Process 3
2.2.       Collection and Treatment of Data 3
2.3.       Data Consolidation and Mapping 5
3.0.      CONSOLIDATED RESULTS OF THE PARTICIPATORY DIAGNOSIS 7
3.1.     Summary of Basic Data(Council population, ethnic groups, biophysical environment) 7
3.2.     Maps (Cameroon, South West Region, Toko) 13
3.3.      Reference Situation per Sector 15
3.3.1.  Excel Sheets 15
3.3.2.  Assets, Potentials, Constraints 15
3.3.3.  Synthesis of Main Economic (trade)Activities 16
3.3.4.  Synthesis of Main Institutions 16
3.3.5.   Synthesis of CID (Council SWOT & Priority Areas for Reinforcement) 18
3.3.6.   Land Use Map 22
3.3.7.   Consolidated Problems & Needs per Sector (Villages, Causes, Effects) 23
4.0.     CONCLUSION 33
ANNEXES : 34
Summary Results of Participatory Village Diagnosis per Sector 34
Problem Analysis and Log frames per Sector 53
Village Priority Projects and Village Development Committees 131
List of External Resource Persons 155
   
     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LISTS OF ABBREVATIONS

 

CEFAM        Centre de Formation de l’Administration Municipale (Local Government Training Center)

CDP                Communal Development Plan

CSO                Civil Society Organisation

CIG                 Common Initiative Group

FEICOM        Fonds Special d’Equipement et d’Intervention Intercommunale

(Special Council Support Fund for Local Authorities)

FSLC              First School Leaving Certificate

GCE                General Certificate of Education

GNS                Government Nursery School

GHS                Government High School

GPS                Government Primary School

GSS                 Government Secondary School

GPS                 Global Positioning System

HPI                  Heifer Project International, Cameroon

LBA                Licence Buying Agent

MINFOF        Ministry of Forestry and Wildlife

MUDEC          Municipal Development Counselling Group

NBDC             National Book Development Council

NTFP             Non Timber Forest Products

OSRI               Organization for Sustainable Rural Infrastructure

PTA                Parents Teachers Association

 PNDP            Programme Nationale Developpement Participatif (National Community Driven Development Program)

SDO                Senior Divisional Officer

SG SOC          Sithe Global (American Palm Investing Company)

SWOT           Strengths Weaknesses Opportunities Threats

TOC               Toko Council

VDC               Village Development Committee

 

 

 

 

 

 

LIST OF TABLES

 

Table 1: Different Ethnic Groups…………………………………………………………………………8

Table 2:  Population Densities by Age Groups……………………………………………………..10

Table 3:   Population Distribution by Gender………………………………………………………..11

Table 4: Assets, Potentials and Constraints…………………………………………………………..15

Table 5: Synthesis of Main Economic Activities…………………………………………………..16

Table 6: Main Institutions and Problems encountered…………………………………………….17

Table 7: Analysis of Primary and Nursery schools within Toko Municipality …………35

Table 8: List of Nursery and Primary schools needed ……………………………………………36

Table 9: Enrolment in Secondary Schools ……………………………………………………………38

Table 10: List of Secondary Schools needed…………………………………………………………38

Table 11: Consolidation of data on health ……………………………………………………………40

Table 12: Diagnosis of water situation in the Municipality …………………………………….42

Table 13: Diagnosis on Bore Hole ………………………………………………………………………43

Table 14: Diagnosis of Electricity ………………………………………………………………………44

Table 15: Forest reserve in the council area …………………………………………………………45

Table 16: Diagnosis of Market Infrastructure ………………………………………………………51

 

 

LIST OF FIGURES & MAPS

 

Figure 1: Population distribution by Age Groups………………………………………………….10

Figure 2: Population distribution by Gender…………………………………………………………12

Figure 3: Map of South West showing TOC…………………………………………………………13

Figure 4: Map of TOC……………………………………………………………………………………….14

Figure 5: Land use Map of TOC………………………………………………………………………….22

Figure 6: Enrollment in Basic Education………………………………………………………………34

Figure 7: Teacher situation in Basic Education……………………………………………………..34

Figure 8: Enrolment in Secondary Education………………………………………………………..37

Figure 9: Teacher situation in Secondary Education………………………………………………37

Figure 10: Need of benches in Secondary Education …………………………………………….39

Figure 11: Situation of Health Personnel ……………………………………………………………..41

Figure 12: Distribution of Forest Reserves …………………………………………………………..46

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

 

A major expected result within the framework of the elaboration of the Communal Development Plan of Toko municipality is the production of the consolidated diagnosis report which constitutes the totality of all information gathered and analyzed from all forty nine villages found in the council area. The report is presented in five principal sections including; executive summary, introduction, methodology, consolidated results of participatory diagnosis and conclusion. The primary objective is to analyze and document sector by sector the data collected to enable coherent planning for each sector. The methodology utilized involved three stages including; preparation, data collection and analysis, consolidation and mapping. Twelve research assistants were deployed for this exercise.

The preparatory stage started with an orientation workshop for the LSOs in Ekona. This workshop was replicated to other staff members and baseline data collected from several sources within and outside the council. Several planning and sensitization meetings were held during which identified stakeholders were actively involved. The official workshop to launch effective field operations took place in Toko town on 5nd August 2011.

Information was collected and diagnosed from all forty nine (49) villages within the municipality. From the findings during field operations few key sectors (agriculture, forestry, territorial administration, public security, public health, basic education, commerce and secondary education) are actively represented within the municipality. In the domain of basic education, there are two nursery and twenty one primary schools which are largely ill equipped with teachers, tables, chairs, benches and buildings. In the health sector there are three centres (two owned by the government while one is owned and operated by the Presbyterian Church in Cameroon) all of which are ill equipped with dilapidated structures. The centre in Toko is practically abandoned and lying in waste. The agriculture and forestry sectors each have a post that conducts limited activities. There is an office for the local administration and a brigade for the gendarmerie. A market and a village bank which were constructed with support from the Rumpi Project are under utilized.

Information collected was analyzed with a variety of tools and consolidated into excel sheets. This enabled the production of the draft strategic plan which was the working document for the planning, resource mobilization and programming workshop.

Diagnosed information using statistical software facilitated the differentiation and presentation of qualitative and quantitative analysis. GIS software was used for the production of geo referenced maps. The GPS points were also collected. The consolidated data (presented on excel sheets) was analyzed to generate tables, graphs, pie charts and bar charts.

 

1.0.         INTRODUCTION

1.1.            Context and Justification

The Government of Cameroon in July 2004 enacted the Law on Decentralization as Applicable to Local Council which mandated councils to provide basic services in several domains including economic, social, health, education, and culture and sports development within their municipalities. The Government has since fostered the process through other instruments such as the Growth and Employment Strategy Paper, the MDGs, the MAPUTO & ACCRA Conventions which are geared at making the country an emergent economy by 2035. Councils have received funds transferred through the Public Investment Budget (PIB) in some key ministries such as Basic and Secondary Education, Public Health, Women Empowerment and Social Affairs to mention but a few.

The following decrees have also fostered the process:

v  Decree N° 2010/0242/PM of 26th February 2010 with regards to the promotion of agricultural production and rural development.

v  Decree N° 2010/0242/PM of 26th February 2010 with regards to the promotion of livestock and fish farming.

v  Decree N° 2010/0242/PM of 26th February 2010 with regards to the construction and maintenance of rural unclassified roads and with  regards to potable water supply in the zones not covered by the public network for the distribution of water conceded by the State.

Further to all these efforts, the National Community Driven Development Programme (PNDP) was commissioned to contribute meaningfully toward poverty alleviation using participatory strategies at the level of local councils. Within the framework for the execution of the PNDP, a cooperation agreement was signed on July 4th 2011 in Ekona between Toko Council, the PNDP and MUDEC Group (a Local Support Organization) in which the PNDP has offered technical and financial support to enable MUDEC Group accompany Toko Council toward the elaboration of its Communal Development Plan (CDP).

A major output of the planning process is the production of a council monograph which represents a sector by sector consolidated report of the findings within each village.

 

1.2.            Participatory Diagnosis Objectives

  • To analyze and document sector by sector the data collected to enable coherent planning for each sector
  • To facilitate knowledge on the development needs in each sector within the municipality.

 

1.3.      Structure of the Document

            The structure of this report constitutes the following sections:

  • Executive Summary
  • Introduction.
  • Methodology.
  • Consolidated Results of Diagnosis.
  • Conclusion
  • Annexes

2.0.         METHODOLOGY

2.1.            Preparatory Process

The preparatory process for the elaboration of the CDP of Toko council area involved several stakeholders and activities. It started with a two week training of key LSO personnel in Ekona which was facilitated by officials of the PNDP. The training ended with the signing of the execution contract between the council, the LSO and the PNDP South West Regional Coordination Unit. The training was thereafter resituated to other MUDEC research assistants while several brainstorming and planning sessions were held with Toko council management.  Secondary data on the socio economic and environmental situation within the municipality was collected and triangulated at the sub divisional, divisional and regional levels of technical services. The council guided by its LSO elaborated a sensitization campaign involving a combination of radio and Church announcements, banners, fliers and the village criers targeting stakeholders including traditional authorities, social and cultural groups, women and youth group representatives, the local heads of technical services, socio professional groups and international organizations operating within the municipality. All sensitization material carried the planning process as well as messages designed to heighten participation of all stakeholders. This process ended with the holding of the official launching workshop on the 5th of August 2011. MUDEC presented an elaborate program of the data to be collected at the council, urban space and in all villages per sector. A Steering Committee was proposed by the mayor and installed by the traditional authorities and the PNDP representatives. Their clearly defined terms of reference were presented to the villagers by the LSO. An expected result was for stakeholders to return with concise memories of their roles and responsibilities in the data collection process. The workshop had 114 participants who represented all shades of opinion within the municipality.

2.2.            Information Collection  and Analysis

Primary data was collected and diagnosed at three different levels namely; the Council Institutional Diagnosis (CID), the Urban Space Diagnosis (USD) and the Sectorial Village by Village Diagnosis. During the CID, researchers started with literature review by reading through council documents relating to financial, material and personnel matters. Interviews and focus group discussions were also conducted to enable the team update and triangulate information gathered. At the internal level of the CID, council service heads such as the Mayor, councilors, Secretary General, Civil Status Registrar and the Finance Clerk represented sources of information while at the external level traditional and religious authorities, VDC members, technical service heads, contractors, beneficiaries of council services and development partners such as KORUP and SITHE GLOBAL were interviewed. Through this method, descriptive data was collected on the systems, structures, staff, management style, culture of the council as well as established the strengths and weaknesses of the council. Data related to the level of interaction between development partners and the council was collected. Data was collected using a variety of tools including semi structured interviews, direct observations, focus discussions and questionnaires. All information collected was triangulated with other sources at the council, divisional or regional levels.

The USD was conducted in Madie I which is the commercial center and in Toko which is the seat of the local administration. Both locations are sparsely populated and have little to show in terms of infrastructure. The services of local facilitators and the use of village criers contributed to the high rate of participation in almost all forty nine villages. Data was collected and analyzed using a variety of tools including participatory mapping, socio economic and environmental surveys and meetings with socio professional group representatives. Participants also engaged in transect walks, simple ranking, producing venn diagrams, focus group discussions and problem analysis using problem and objective trees. Waypoints were collected using the Global Positioning System (GPS). Interactive discussions, direct observations and site visits were also utilized in certain areas in the municipality. The historical timeline assisted participants to identify previous development efforts and their partners within the urban spaces.

The participatory village by village and sector by sector diagnosis covered 49 villages in the municipality including; Toko, Bweme, Mobenge, Ikoti I, Ikoti II,  Bekita, Bokuba, Iboko, Meangwe I, Bonabeanga, Basari,  Nwamoki, Iyombo, Ikoi,  Dikome,  Iwasa,  Ngamoki I,  Moboka, Madie, Madie New Town, Madie III Boembe, Mapanja (Ngamoki II), Mofako, Dienge, Dipundu , Tombe, Banyo, Ndoi,  Itali,  Debonda Koroki, Debonda Mosina, Masaka,  Bombangi, Babiabanga, Ipongi, Bareka II, Lobe Batanga, Baromba,  Bareka I, Manya,  Lipenja, Ikenge, Esukotan, Iyoe, Illondo, Kilekile, Mayeka,Esoki and Lowe.

A total of twelve researchers with clearly defined terms of reference were constituted into three teams of four individuals. They spent an average of three days per village in order to collect and diagnose information as prescribed in the PNDP methodology.

The village by village and sector by sector data collection and diagnosis (Problem Identification and Analysis) were participatory in that all the different stakeholders and all shades of opinion were given equal opportunities to make valuable contributions. During plenary exercises men, women and youth collectively identified the core problems per sector which were later prioritized, analyzed and reformulated using problem and objective trees for causes and effects.

Participatory Rural Appraisal (PRA) methods with gender considerations were utilized to assemble field realities. These included: meetings, semi structured interviews, focus group discussions, participative mappings, transect walks, simple ranking, venn diagrams, and problem analysis using problem and objective trees.   Interactive discussions, direct observations and site visits were also utilized in certain areas in the municipality. Waypoints were collected using the Global Positioning System (GPS). Information collected was triangulated with various sources at the council, sub divisional, divisional and regional levels.

 

Focus group Discussion

Participatory diagnosis/gender approach in diagnosis

 

2.3.            Data Consolidation & Mapping

 

The consolidated data (presented on excel sheets) was analyzed using software that enabled us to generate tables, graphs, pie charts and bar charts. The GIS software also assisted in the production of geo referenced maps.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Villagers using planning Materials

Collection of GPS points in Lipenja.

Display of information sheets.

Participatory mapping.

Participatory Village meetings.

Village Housing.

Data Collection in Villages.

3.0.                           CONSOLIDATED RESULTS OF THE PARTICIPATORY DIAGNOSIS.

3.1.         Synthesis of Basic General Data 

 

The council was created within the framework of decree no. 77/203 of 19th June 1977 to setup councils and define their boundaries. A Presidential decree in April 1995 created Toko District which was later upgraded to a sub division by another decree in 2009. It is located between latitude 465133, 600763 N and longitude 493410, 5360303 E with an altitude of about 795 above sea level at Ndoi/ Bombangi. It is bordered to the north by Dikume Balue, to the south by Eyumojock, to the east by Konye and Nguti and to the west by Mundemba.

The council is located about forty two (42) km away from Mudemba which is the seat of the Divisional Administration of Ndian.

Description of the Biophysical Environment

Climate

Toko municipality has an equatorial climate where there are two distinct seasons: a long rainy season of about eight months and a relatively shorter dry season of about four months.  The annual amount of rainfall ranges from 3500mm to 5000mm.The rainfall pattern provides suitable conditions for the growth of both perennial and annual crops thus allowing for two cropping seasons a year. Rainfall is a major determinant on agricultural production in terms of the crops grown, the farming system and the sequence and timing of farming operations.

Daily temperatures are relatively moderate throughout the year and ranges from 20°C to 30°C. Humidity varies with the absolute value and the seasonal distribution of rainfall, being uniformly moderate throughout the wet season, and falling to lower levels during the dry season

Soils

The Toko municipality has rich clay loam and lateritic soil type which is very fertile for agricultural production.  This has greatly influenced the cultivation of both cash and food crops. Due to poor farming techniques in the area, the soil is gradually losing its fertility.

Relief 

The topography is undulating with hills and slopes ranging from between 200 to about 1000m.  Hence, movement from one village to the other within municipality which is done primarily on foot as result of the poor road network is very difficult.

Hydrology

The Toko council area has so many streams, springs and waterfalls which have direct bearings with the river Meme which takes it rise from the Rumpi Hills as it drains the highlands of Madie, Dikome Balue and the coastal lowlands of Mbonge in the Meme Division before emptying into the Atlantic Ocean. The Combrany River which originates from within Toko municipality also empties itself into the Meme River.  These features can serve as potential tourist sites within the municipality when developed. Despite the seemingly abundant availability of ware, only three villages have made meaningful effort at having portable water supply including Madie Ngolo, Madie New Town and Toko. The rest of the population depends entirely on springs, streams and rainfall as sources of drinking water.

 Vegetation and Fauna.       

The vegetation is characterised by the evergreen tropical forest most of which contains tree species of immense economic value. The Korup Project, Rumpi Hills and Philanthropic forest reserves of the area contains a rich variety of flora and fauna. Many non-timber forest products are also found, including kola nuts and bush pepper, njansang, bitter cola and a variety of medicinal plants.

The difference in topography, vegetation and climate gives rise to a variety of both food and cash crops which includes; banana, cocoyam, maize, cassava, plantains cocoa, and oil palm. Cocoa is the main cash crop within the municipality.

Some of the animal species includes; elephants, monkeys, porcupines etc.

 

The History of the People within the municipality (origin of the people, population, ethnic groups, religions, main economic activities)

Ethnic Groups and inter-ethnic relations

The indigenes of Toko municipality comprise the Ngolo, Batanga and Bakoko. There are other migrants from different parts of the Cameroon such as the Bayangi, Dongolo, Bakundu and indigenes of North West Region are coexisting in the municipality and inter married.

 

Table 1: Different Ethnic Groups within the municipality

No. Villages Main Ethnic group Ethnic group 1 Ethnic group  2 Ethnic group   3 Ethnic group 4
1 Madie Ngolo Ngolo (Ekama Clan) Grass fielders Batanga
2 Madie New Town Ngolo (Ekama Clan) Batanga
3 Madie III Boembe Ngolo (Ekama Clan) Batanga
4 Banyo Ngolo
5 Iyombo Ngolo
6 Bonabeanga Ngolo
7 Mofako Batanga
8 Bweme Ngolo Dongolo Oroko
9 Dienge Ngolo
10 Ngamoki I Ngolo (Ekama Clan)
11 Illondo Ngolo
12 Kilekile Ngolo
13 Iwasa Ngolo
14 Mapanja (Ngamoki II) Ngolo (Ekama Clan)
15 Ikoi Ngolo
16 Iyoe Batanga
17 Mobenge Ngolo Oroko
18 Ndoi Ngolo
19 Dikome Ngolo Ngolo
20 Tombe Ngolo
21 Moboka Ngolo
22 Meangwe I Ngolo
23 Toko Ngolo Batanga Bakoko Orocko
24 Manya Ngolo
25 Mayeke Batanga
26 Bareka I Batanga
27 B asari Ngolo
28 Dipundu Batanga
29 Nwamoki Ngolo
30 Itali Batanga
31 Debonda II Batanga
32 Debonda I Batanga
33 Masaka Batanga
34 Bombangi Batanga
35 Ipongi Batanga
36 Babiabanga Batanga
37 Lobe Batanga Batanga
38 Bareka II Batanga
39 Betika Ngolo
40 Bokuba Ngolo
41 Iboko Ngolo
42 Lipenja Batanga Grassfielders
43 Baromba Batanga
44 Ikoti II Ngolo
45 Esoki Batanga
46 Lowe Batanga
47 Ikoti Ngolo
48 Ikenge Bakoko
49 Esukotan Bakoko Ngolo Bayangi Bakundu Grass fielders

                 Source: Village Survey (Aug. / Sept.  2011)

 

Religion

Christianity is the predominant religion within Toko Municipality and there is freedom of worship.  The main Christian denomination in the area is the the Presbyterians and Pentecostals.

The Presbyterian Church in Cameroon contributes to the development of the municipality by providing basic health facilities, such as the Presbyterian Health Center at Madie Ngolo.

 

Mobility of the population

The rate of movement into and out Toko Municipality is very low. This is due to a large extent to the absence of employment opportunities in the council area and the inaccessibility of villages within the municipality as a result of the poor road network. There are civil servants who have been transferred to the different schools and health centres within the Toko sub division and who are hardly around due to the harsh living realities in the council area.

There is high rate of rural exodus as people, especially the youth move from the municipality to other sub divisions and cities either to search for jobs, better education (attend universities or professional schools) and to do business.

Basic Socio Economic Infrastructure

Size and structure of the population

The total population size of Toko municipality in 2010 was estimated at seven thousand and thirty five (7.035) inhabitants of whom there are 3.515 men and 3.520 women. (Source: Bureau of Census & Population Studies). But from field survey, the population was estimate to be 14.045 inhabitants of whom   are men 3815,   women 4480 and 5625 being children.

 

The municipality has a total surface area of 103,413 hectares (1,034.13 km2) representing a population density of fifteen to thirty (15 to 30) inhabitants per km2 (source: South West Master Plan). This low population density in Toko is due to the dense tropical forest most of which are reserved. The table below shows the structure of the population within the municipality.

 

Table 2: Population Densities by age group

No. Age bracket

Total population

1 0-6years

395

2 6-14  years

2,327

3 15-19years

2,913

4 20-34years

7,323

5 35-59 years

536

6 60+ years

551

  Total

14.045

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fig: 1 Age structure of the population

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 3: Population distributions by gender in the Municipality

 

No.

Village Men Women Children Total

1

Madie Ngolo

100

100

500

700

2

Madie New Town

80

85

200

365

3

Madie III Boembe

60

63

150

273

4

Banyo

30

40

57

127

5

Iyombo

93

30

40

163

6

Bonabeanga

8

6

11

25

7

Mofako

150

300

400

850

8

Bweme

21

16

24

61

9

Dienge

262

200

150

612

10

Ngamoki I

207

293

110

610

11

Illondo

7

19

39

65

12

Kilekile

16

18

30

64

13

Iwasa

120

150

105

375

14

Nwamoki

29

55

30

114

15

Mapanja (Ngamoki II)

200

250

215

665

16

Ikoi

150

250

145

545

17

Iyoe

9

12

43

64

18

Mobenge

17

34

34

85

19

Ndoi

92

100

65

257

20

Dikome Ngolo

150

62

85

297

21

Tombe

11

10

17

38

22

Moboka

100

150

261

511

23

Meangwe I

150

159

291

600

24

Toko

250

261

300

811

25

Manya

1

0

0

1

26

Mayeka

5

4

1

10

27

Bareka I

120

200

120

440

28

Itali

60

90

70

220

29

Dibonda II

170

210

120

500

30

Dibonda I

50

95

65

210

31

Masaka

5

9

49

63

32

Bombangi

50

74

78

202

33

Ipongi

53

55

117

225

34

Babiabanga

45

50

105

200

35

Lobe Batanga

15

30

22

67

36

Bareka II

30

27

61

118

37

Betika

157

93

150

400

38

Bokuba

51

100

49

200

39

Iboko

100

105

45

250

40

Lipenja

100

117

283

500

41

Boromba

1

0

0

1

42

Ikoti II Batanga

210

190

300

700

43

Esoki

45

20

60

125

44

Lowe

1

1

5

7

45

Ikoti

22

40

18

80

46

Ikenge

80

100

170

350

47

Esukotan

150

200

160

510

48

Basari

15

15

20

50

49

Dipundu

12

12

15

39

  Total Population

3815

4480

5625

14.045

             

                 Source: Village Survey (Aug. / Sept.  2011)

 

 

 

 Fig 2: Population distribution by gender

From the analysis of the findings, men constitute 27% of the total population while women and children constitute 32% and 41% respectively. Persons of primary school age (6-14 years) represent 17 % of the population while individuals between the ages 20-34years make up 54% of the population thus indicating that Toko municipality has a very youthful population. This indicator is in line with the national trends in population.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.2.            Maps of Cameroon, South West Region & Toko

Fig 3: Map of the South West Region showing the Toko Council Area

 

 

 

Fig. 4: Map of TOC

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.3.            Reference Situation per Sector:

3.3.1.      Excel Sheets

3.3.2.      Natural Assets, Potentials and Constraints within the Municipality  

The main assets and potentials within the municipality include numerous waterfalls, forest reserves, streams, rivers and caves.

Sector

Assets

Potentials 

Constraints

Tourism Waterfalls  

-Tourist sites

-Generate  Hydro electricity-Inaccessible  road network

– Poorly constructed bridges

–  Landslides Caves-Tourist sites

-Inaccessible road network

– Poorly constructed bridges

–  Landslides

Forestry and wildlife

Rumpi  Hills-Monkeys, Alligators, porcupines 

-Medicinal plants, NTFPs

-Timber-Illegal exploitation of timber species

-Illegal poachingKorup Forest-Monkeys, Alligators, alligators, elephants, Medicinal plants, NTFPs

-Timber-Illegal exploitation of timber species

-Illegal poachingChristian Philanthropic forest-Monkeys, Alligators, alligators, elephants

– Medicinal plants, NTFPs

-Timber-Illegal exploitation of timber species

-Illegal poachingWater and EnergyStreams , Rivers, Springs-Sand extraction,

-Fresh Water Sources-Drought

-PollutionCommerceSG SOC-Plantation Agriculture

.Employment Opportunities-Landslides

-Village Land Disputes

Table 4: Assets, Potentials and Constraints of the Biophysical Environ


3.3.3.      Synthesis of Main Economic (Trade) Activities

 

Gender Main Economic Activity
Men
  • Farming of Cash Crops (cocoa)
  • Hunting
  • Fishing
Women ü  Farming of food crops (banana, cocoyam, plantains, vegetable and spices)ü  Trading (buyam sellam)ü  Restoration
Youth v  Farming (cash/food crops)v  Hunting/Trappingv  Fishing

Table 5: Synthesis of Main Economic Activities

Source: Village Study Aug./ Sept. 2011

 

3.3.4.      List of Main Institutions and problems encountered (Table 6):

No Name & Status of Groups Activity Problems encountered
01 Toko Development Women (registered CIG) Farming plantains & banana Limited Access to fertilizers, equipment and modern techniques
02 Chosobola Group (registered CIG) Animal rearing Limited Access to high breed and feed, equipment
03 Center for Rural Development Production (CEFAP)/ registered Crop production and marketing Limited Access to fertilizers, equipment and modern techniques
04 Rural Progressive (registered CIG) Rearing goats Limited Access to high breed and feed, equipment
05 Senase (registered CIG) Crop farming Limited Access to fertilizers, equipment and modern techniques
06 Se-keke Royal Progressive Group (registered) Rearing goats and fowls Limited Access to high breed and feed, equipment
07 MOBIA (registered CIG) Farming plantain and banana Limited Access to fertilizers, equipment and modern techniques
08 Ngekenesesopole (registered CIG) Mixed crop farming Limited Access to fertilizers, equipment and modern techniques
09 Dynamic Women of Toko Savings and Loans Scheme Not registered
10 Christian Women Fellowship Spiritual/ evangelization work Not registered
11 BAKE (registered CIG) Mixed crop farming Limited Access to fertilizers, equipment and modern techniques
12 IBOKO CIG (registered) Animal rearing Limited Access to high breed and feed, equipment
13 BASAMAI CIG (registered) Farming plantains and banana Limited Access to fertilizers, equipment and modern techniques

 

 


3.3.5. Synthesis of CID

3.3.5.1. SWOT Analysis of TOC

  Strengths Human Resources
  • Youthful and Committed Staff
General Administration v  Legal Entity with identified boundariesv  Regular Deliberations by at least 85% of Councilors
Financial Resources
  • Standard Operating Procedure for Revenue Collection
Assets
  • Available equipment such Tipper and 4×4 Hilux
  • Available Council Chambers
  • Available Council Real Estate
Relation with Partners v  Cordial Relationship with Supervisory Authority
Weaknesses Human Resources v  No Municipal Treasurerv  No clearly elaborated Job Descriptions for staffv  No system of staff evaluationv  No Gender Policyv  Absence of Staff Meetingsv  Under Staffed with limited knowledge on Council Management

v  Limited training opportunities for council staffs

v  Untrained Councilors

v  Non Functional Council Standing Committees

General Administration
  • Irregular Payment of staff salaries
  • Limited Delegation of Authority
  • Poor collaboration among council executive
  • General laxity at work (Deputies Mayors & SG are not always on seat)
  • Low rate of implementation of Municipal Decisions
  • Limited Flow of Information at all levels
  • Poor Filing System (No archives)
  • No Standard Operating Manuals and Procedures on Council Functioning
Financial Resources v  Poor Tax Basev  Limited Cooperation between the Council and the business communityv  Inadequate strategies for revenue collection
Assets
  • No Policy on the use of council assets
  • Obsolete office equipment
Relations with Partners v  Non collaboration with business community and other development actors within the municipalityv  No Open Day programs between the population and the council.v  No Policy for Public Private Partnerships within the municipality
Opportunities   v  Tropical Forests with potentials for Research, Conservation, by International and National partners (Korup National Park, Rumpi Forest, Christian Philanthropic Forest.
    v  Availability of tourist potentials e.g. waterfalls, caves, Eco Tourismv  Available Land for Agro Industrial Production (SG SOC) oil palm exploitationv  Available Funding partners e.g. FEICOM, PNDPv  Potentials for hire (payment) by the community.
Threats   v  Non resident heads of technical servicesv  Risky & undulating terrainv  Rural Exodus for the youthv  Poor Tax Base

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.3.5.2. Priority Areas for Reinforcement of TOC:

No. Main axes of reinforcement Activities for Reinforcement 
1 Human Resource capacities Train Staff & Councilors based on their training needs
Elaborate Job descriptions for each staff
Pay Staff outstanding salaries (unpaid since December 2010)
Develop Internal Rules and Regulations for staff
Solicit the services of a Municipal Treasurer
2 Financial Resource Mobilization Develop Financial Procedures on council revenue and expenditures
Identify & Sensitize all taxable resources  and activitiesDevelop Strategies for effective Collection of Global Tax.
3 Reinforce Collaboration with Council Stakeholders
  • Identify all Council Stakeholders
  • Organise Toko Development Forum
  • Stimulate Functioning of Water and Electricity Committees in Madie & Toko villages.
  • Elaborate Twinning opportunities for Toko Municipality
4 Management of Council Assets v  Render Market in Meangwe I to be functionalv  Develop Standard Operating Procedures for the use of the council 4×4 pick up vehicle and the Tipper.v  Acquire office equipment (data processing and furniture)v  Paint the Council Chambersv  Initiate Agro Business on 300 hectares of land
         

 

 

3.3.6. Land Use Map of TOC (Fig. 5):

 


 

3.3.7. Consolidated Problems and Needs per Sector

Sector

Core

Problem

Causes

Effects

Needs

Basic Education   Limited access to quality Basic Education
  • Insufficient qualified teaching staff
  • Insufficient classrooms
  • Insufficient  benches
  • Limited permanent classrooms
  • Limited access to didactic materials
  • No functional school libraries
  • No residence for staff
  • Insufficient latrines and water points in schools
  • High illiteracy rate
  • Juvenile delinquency
  • Rural Exodus
  • Poor Results at Public Examinations
  • High rate of school dropouts
  • Construct permanent structures and additional classrooms in schools
  • Recruit qualified teaching personnel
  • Supply didactic materials and other school needs
  • Construct water points, latrines, fences, libraries
  • Initiate contacts with NBDC
   
Secondary Education   Limited access to quality Secondary Education
  • Insufficient number of secondary schools
  • Insufficient qualified teaching staff
  • No play groups in schools
  • Limited classroom equipment and furniture
  • Limited access to didactic materials (students and teachers)
  • No functional school libraries
  • No latrines, fences and water points in schools
  • Low scolarisation rate
  • Poor performance of school
  • High rate of school drop outs
  • High rate of illiteracy
  • Juvenile delinquency
  • High rate of prostitution
  • Rural exodus
 
  • Construct additional classrooms in schools
  • Recruit qualified teaching personnel
  • Supply didactic materials and other school needs
  • Construct water points, latrines, fences, libraries
  • Create a high school within the council area
  • Initiate contacts with NBDC

 

Public Health  Limited access to quality health care services
  • Insufficient health equipment for consultations, pharmacy, laboratory
  • Insufficient qualified medical personnel
  • Insufficient and inadequate coverage of community outreach programs
  • Inadequate  health infrastructures
  • Long distance trek to existing  health units

 

  • High cost of health treatment
  • High prevalence of diseases
  • High infant mortality rate
  • High rate of rural exodus
  • Drop in per capital income
  • High cost of  expenditure
  • High death rate
  • Low standards of living
  • Recruit qualified medical personnel
  • Supply modern health equipment (beds, refrigerators, laboratory, drugs)
Water   Poor access to potable water
  • Insufficient potable water points
  • Inadequate alternative sources of potable water.
  • None functional pipe borne water supply
  • Long distance to fetch water in streams
  • Poorly treated available sources like the community wells
  • § High prevalence of water borne diseases
  • § High cost to treat related water borne diseases
  • § Drop in per capital income
  • § Low standards of living
  • § Construct more water schemes in more villages
  • § Rehabilitate existing water points In Madie and Toko
  • § Initiate contacts with OSRI
   
Energy  Poor access to electricity supply
  • None functional thermal electricity plants  in Toko and Madie Ngolo
  • No connection to the national electricity supply network (AES SONEL)
  • None functional maintenance committees for community generators
  • High cost to maintain  community generators
  • § Difficulty using electrical appliances
  • § High incidence in  health hazards like eye problems
  • § Difficulties for students  to study  at night
  • § High rate of insecurity
  • § Difficulty managing perishable foods
 
  • § Rehabilitate  electrification networks in in Toko and Madie Ngolo
  • Extension of AES SONEL  from Mundemba to Toko
Public Works   Poor state of rural road network
  • None maintenance of earth roads
  • Poor  state of culverts and bridges
  • Insufficient farm to market roads
  • Poor community mobilization
  • None existence of road maintenance committees
  • High cost of transportation
  • Limited circulation of persons, good and services
  • Rural exodus
  • Overloading of persons on clandestine vehicles
  • Drop in per capital income
  • Drop in living standards
  • High rate of accidents
  • Constant maintenance of existing road network
  • Construct bridges and culverts
  • Extend road network to other villages
  • Acquire front head loader
  • Rehabilitate council tipper
  • Initiate contacts with OSRI
   
Women Empowerment and  the Promotion of the Family   Marginalization of women and children
  • Absence of social structures
  • Insufficient and inadequate social facilities
  • Weak economic power of women
  • Insufficient and inadequate representation and participation of women in development and political issues
  • Ignorance of women on their rights
  • Under scholarisation of the girl child
  • Absence of  gender policy
  • Insufficient opportunities for the women and the girl child
  • High dependence rate of women
  • High prevalence  of early births for the girl child
  • High prevalence of abandoned children
  • High prevalence of early girl child marriages
  • Mobilize and sensitize on gender equality and related topics
  • Train administrative and council authorities on gender mainstreaming
  • Equip Home Economics Center in Toko.
  • Sensitize and train on women’s rights and the family
  • Train and support women on income generating activities
  • Initiate contacts with REACH OUT, Cameroon
   
Commerce  InsufficientBusiness and commercial activities
  • Insufficient market facilities
  • Poor information on prices of goods in other areas
  • Poor road network
  • Insufficient financial institutions
  • High price speculation on products
  • Insufficient revenue
  • Risk of diseases and loss of goods
  • Exploitation of the communities by traders (buyam-sellams)
  • Construct modern periodic market in Madie
  • Improve on Market in Toko Information Systems
  • Regularly maintain road network
  • Initiate contacts with SG SOC & KORUP
  • Activate Toko Village Bank
  • Lobby for Installation of Micro finance institution
   
Agriculture and Rural Development Low  agricultural production / productivity
  • § High cost of farm inputs
  • § Inadequate technical know how
  • § Pest and diseases attack on cocoa (black pod)
  • § Limited access to improved planting materials
  • Insufficient and inadequate transport facilities
  • § Limited access to agricultural equipment and inputs
  • § Insufficient training of farmers
  • § Low financial capacity on producers
  • § Insufficient technical personnel
  • § Limited access to training opportunities
  • § No storage facilities
  • § Drop in agricultural out put
  • § Low  revenue
  • § Poor living standards
  • § Low purchasing power
  • § Low harvest
  • § High post harvest losses
  • § Rural Exodus
 
  • § Organize trainings on modern production techniques and agricultural inputs utilization
  • § Provide modern farming equipment   to farmers
  • § Recruit trained agricultural personnel
  • § Provide modern storage facilities for perishable products
  • § Create and constantly maintain farm to market roads
  • § Network with KORUP Management Plan
  • § Network with SG SOC Management Plan
  • § Network with Christian Philanthropic Management Plan
Livestock, Fisheries and Animal Industries Low livestock and fisheries production/productivity
  • High cost of animal feed
  • Poor techniques of animal rearing (free range)
  • Inadequate technical know how.
  • Poor methods on animal rearing
  • Limited access to livestock technical services.
  • Fish Poisoning
  • § High rate of diseases outbreaks
  • § Limited Production of high  breed  animal species
  • § Low intake of protein
  • § Reduced revenue
  • § Low standards of living

 

  • Organize capacity building for animal breeders
  • Restructure  CIGs
  • Assist animal farmers with seed capital.
  • Initiate contacts with HPI
State Property and Land Tenure  High insecurity of state property and land
  • Limited number of title deeds for state and private property
  • Cultural limitations
  • Poor community sensitization on the importance of land titles and how to go about it
  • § Illegal possession of land
  • § Conflicts between individuals and  neighboring villages
  • § Create Sub delegation in the municipality
  • § Facilitate access to title deeds.
  • § Sensitize population on land issues.
   
Housing and Urban Development   Poor Town Planning
  • Construction of housing using local and temporal materials
  • Poor financial capacity of the population
  • Insecurity of occupied land
  •  Limited access to a communal electrification network
  • Absence of urban development and housing facilities
  • Absence of a Council Plan for villages
  • Absence of waste management plan
    • Haphazard building of houses
    • Poor construction of houses
    • Absence of vision and consciousness on construction of modern houses
    • High rate of water borne diseases
    • High rate of fire disasters
    • High rate of promiscuity
    • High rate of accidents
    • § Create and institute functional communal electricity and pipe borne water networks
    • § Elaborate Town plan
    • § Facilitate access to construction and building materials/equipment
   
Environment, Nature Protection and Sustainable Development High rate of Environmental degradation
  • High rate of water pollution
  • Poor management of natural resources
  • High rate of timber exploitation by illegal exploiters
  • Poor drainage system
  • § Displacement and extinction of animal  species
  • § High rate of erosion
  • § High incident of climate change
  • § Increase rate of pollution
    • Encourage tree planting
    • Sensitize on the impact on environmental issues
   
Forestry and Wildlife  High rate of forest exploitation
  • Illegal exploitation of the forests  for timber
  • Illegal hunting in the forest
  • Poor knowledge of forestry laws
  • Insufficient Forest controllers
  • Absence of a structure for the forestry post.
  • § Disappearance of certain species
  • § Destruction of biodiversity
  • § Climate change
  • Displacement of animal species
  • § Construct forestry post
  • § Increase number of technical staff in the forestry post
  • § Sensitize on the forestry laws
   
Territorial Administration and Decentralization  Insufficient local administrative services
  • Unavailable  personnel
  • Insufficient equipment
  • Limited collaboration with VTC
  • Slow classification of Chiefs
  • High  costs associated with administrative services
  • § High rate of rural exodus
  • § Drop in population
  • § Reduced trust of local administration
    • Transfer personnel and supply working equipment
    • Speed up process of classifying Chiefs
    • Develop confidence building measures and Sensitize population
   
Higher Education Inaccessibility to higher education
  • Absence of  professional education facilities
  • Insufficient  financial resources of parents

 

  • Difficult access to socio-professional training
  • High educational fees
  • Abandonment of studies
  • Juvenile delinquency
  • Under-development
  • Insufficient number of educated elites
  • § Offer scholarships to youths who have completed secondary education
 
Social Affairs   Insufficient social services and empowerment of vulnerable persons
  • Non existence of a data base of vulnerable persons
  • Absence of social centre and other infrastructure
  • None existence of social workers
  • Psychological trauma
  • Juvenile delinquency
  • Construct social centre
  • Recruit social workers to be at their disposal and to offer psycho-social assistance to them when need be
  • Establish lists of vulnerable.
  • Initiate contacts with REACHOUT
   
 Youth and Citizen Education  Insufficient youth empowerment facilities and programs
  • Insufficient trainers and youth animators
  • Limited entrepreneurial capacities
  • Limited access to funding youth interests
  • High illiteracy rate
  • Absence of youth empowerment structures and services
  • Limited mobilization of youths on income generating activities
  • § High rate of unemployment
  • § High illiteracy rate
  • § Juvenile  delinquency
  • § High rate of teenagers pregnancies
  • § High prevalence and spread of HIV and AIDS
  • § High rate of rural exodus
  • § Increase sensitization of youths on different opportunities available
  • § Create  functional youth empowerment centers
  • § Recruit youth trainers and animators
   
Sports and Physical Education  Insufficient  sporting activities
  • Insufficient sporting activities
  • Insufficient sport equipment in schools
  • Insufficient sport teachers in the different schools
  • § Low rate of physical exercise
  • § Poor development of sports and leisure disciplines
  • § Absence of sport organizations
  • § Insufficient  sport competitions
  • § Construct a sports complex
  • § Institute Proper management of the available sports facilities
  • § Employ sport teachers in schools
  • § Organize local  sporting activities
   
Transport Poor means of  transportation
  • Non existence of transport agencies in the municipality
  • Non existent transporters union
  • High cost of transport
  • Poor state of roads
  • Poor state of vehicles
  • Overloading of vehicles  and motor bikes
  • High rate of accidents
  • Inadequate circulation of persons and goods
  • Low economic activities
  • Drop in the labor force
  • High cost of transport
  • Rural exodus
  • Reorganize rural transportation network
   
Employment and Vocational Training  High rate of unemployment
  • Absence of a vocational training centre
  • Insufficient  employment opportunities
  • High illiteracy rate
  • Absence of professional training for potential job seekers
  • Absence of professional training schools
  • § High rate of illegal activities
  • § Juvenile delinquency
  • § High crime wave
  • § Construct SAR-SM and a professional training centre
  • § Support self employment through supply of seed capital
   
Small and Medium size Enterprises, Social Economy and Handicraft Insufficient actors in the informal sector  
  • Ignorance on procedures and formalities on enterprises creation
  • Limited opportunities for (mechanics, tailoring, panel beating/welding etc)
  • Weak vision and entrepreneurial capacity
  • Low capacity and skills of the population
  • Slow and weak promotion of the sector
  • High prices for basic services
  • High taxes for existing enterprises
  • Weak economic power of the population and the council
  • Insufficient revenue collection and diversification strategies
  • Create enabling environment to attract informal sector actors
  • Sensitize on small and medium size enterprises services
  • Support creation  of small and medium size enterprises and related services
   
Scientific Research and Innovation  Limited access to scientific innovations
  • Absence of research facilities (structures, personnel, equipment)
  • Poor dissemination of scientific innovations
  • Poor policy formulation and programming by the state with petroleum companies
  • Little or no information on agro pastoral innovations
  • Limited access to improved planting materials
  • Poor promotion of sectoral activities
  • Low quality of agricultural / Livestock products
  • Rudimentary production techniques
  • Poor production
  • Low revenues
  • High poverty rates
  • Train local community researchers
  • Institute Award of best innovative research projects
  • Carry out research on other  potentials
  • Initiate contacts with research departments of KORUP and PAMOL.
   
Tourism and Leisure  Poor development of touristic potentials
  • Absence of touristic infrastructures
  • Poor development of touristic sites
  • Enclave communities
  • Poor Road network
  • § Poor attraction of tourists
  • § Poor economic power of the population and the communities
  • § Limited benefits from Pro Poor Tourism activities
  • § Develop touristic sites
  • § Construct touristic infrastructures (hotels, restaurants and guest houses)
  • § Maintain road network
   
Arts and Culture    High rate of deterioration of cultural values
  • § Absence of  community halls
  • § Poor development and promotion of cultural initiatives
  • § Poor socio-cultural infrastructure
  • § Poor financial and organizational capacity
  • § Poor community  mobilization
  • § Non-binding decisions of ‘Palaver Houses’
  • § Loss of cultural values
  • § No cultural contribution in the economic growth of   communities
  • § Rural Exodus
 
  • § Construct community halls
  • § Organize cultural events
  • § Construct cultural Shrines

 

Industry, Mines and Technological Development Limited Development of the mining /  industrial sector
  • No feasibility studies carried out in this sector
  • Absence of trainings
  • Poor sensitization of the population
  • Absence of mining and industrial serctor policy

 

  • Poor conception of development plans
  • Over exploitation of resources
  • None financing of micro projects by companies
  • Weak economic power of the council and population
  • High rate of poverty in the communities
  • Conduct feasibility study on existing minerals within the municipality.
  • Organize a Toko Development Conference
 
Post and Telecommunications  Difficult access to information and postal services
  • Poor access to Radio,  TV and internet signals
  • Poor Mobile Telecommunication network
  • Absence of Community radio station

 

  • § Population is less informed
  • § Poor exposure to the outside world
  • § Difficulties in communicating with people within and out of the community
  • § High rate of unemployment
    • § Install radio and TV network antennas
    • § Establish Community radio
    • § Institute Mobile Telecommunication net works
 
Labour and Social Security  High rate of Job insecurity
  • Insufficient number of stabilized enterprises and organizations
  • Poor organization and structuring of self employment
  • High taxes
  • Poor sensitization
  • § Poor participation in development activities
  • § High rate of poverty
  • § High rate of rural exodus
    • § Attract enterprises in the municipality
    • § Sensitize on the rights of the employee
   
Public Security  High rate of insecurity
  • No resident public security staff
  • No permanent security offices
  • Refusal of transferred staff to reside in the municipality
  • High rates of unprosecuted domestic disputes
  •   High crime wave
  •  Create public security post
  • Transfer security staff
  • Construct houses for security staff
   
Communication  Poor communication networks
  • Poor access to Cameroon TV and Radio signals
  • Poor lobbying capacity
  • No community radio
  • Poor initiation of community radio project
  • Poor circulation of newspapers
  • No newspaper agents
  • Poor circulation of information
  • Limited access to development programs
  • Limited access to world events
  • Install CRTV antenna
  • Create community radio
  • Install news paper vendors
   

 

 

 

 

 

 


4.0.         CONCLUSION:

 

The Consolidated Diagnosis phase for elaborating the Communal Development Plan of Toko can best be assessed through a bird’s eye review of the processes involved, the timing, the interaction of the partners and the expected outputs.

The process constituted three principal stages including the preparatory stage (training, planning and sensitization meetings and the holding of the official launching workshop of stakeholders), the information collection and analysis stage which involved working with internal as well as external stakeholders of the council and the inhabitants of two urban centres (Madie I and Toko). Information was also collected sector by sector in all forty nine villages using a variety of tools. Attendance sheets were completed by participants after each meeting. The third stage in the process was the consolidation of information into excels sheets which also permitted the production of graphs, charts and tables.

 

The timing for the execution of this phase of the work (August, September, October and November 2011) was challenging as resource persons had to perform their tasks during heavy rainfall with over flooded rivers which are located within the municipality.

The key partners who facilitated this exercise included the council, the LSO and the PNDP who collaborated effectively to achieve the required result.

 

Along side the consolidated diagnosis, two other expected outputs were realized. These include the Council Institutional Diagnosis (CID) which summarizes the prevailing situation (SWOT) of the council and proposes priority actions for reinforcement. The second output is the Urban Space Diagnosis (USD) conducted in two major villages which have some basic infrastructure to be delimited as urban centres. These include Toko which is the seat of the local administration and Madie I which has a vibrant population that enjoys a few basic social services.

 

The problem and objective trees, log frames and activities with their related costs were validated by an enlarged council session. The consolidated diagnosis enabled the production of a draft strategic plan which was used during the planning, resource mobilization and programming workshop.

 

 

 

ANNEXES:

SUMMARY RESULTS OF PARTICIPATORY VILLAGE DIAGNOSIS PER SECTOR

 

Basic Education

Toko municipality has a total of twenty one (21) Government Primary Schools and two (2) Nursery Schools distributed in twenty one villages within the municipality.  There is no lay private institution within this sector in the council area. None of the schools has access to neither a water point nor a fence. Four (4) schools (19%) have a pit latrine. Forty nine percent (49%) of the pupil population are girls while fifty one percent (51%) are boys. The table below shows the situation of pupils and teachers within the municipality.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                          Fig 6: Enrolment in Basic Education.

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

Fig: 7 Teachers Situation in Basic education (There are 86 teachers within the sector)

 

 

Table 7:   Analysis of Primary and Nursery schools within Toko municipality

  School Total Enrolment Classrooms Effective number of teachers Number of desks Classroom/ Pupil ratio Teacher/Pupil ratio Desk/ Pupil ratio Number of schools having water points Number of schools having toilets Number of schools fenced
No. Type   Boys Girls Total Permanent Semi permanent Temporal
1 GS Madie New Town

68

58

126

2

2

0

3

56

1 :32

1 :42

1 :3

N

N

N

2 GS Madie I

46

42

88

2

2

0

7

80

1 :44

1 :13

1 :1

N

Y

N

3 GS Madie III Boembe

25

20

45

0

0

5

8

70

1 :9

1 :6

1 :1

N

N

N

4 GS Banyo

22

12

34

0

0

5

3

10

1 :7

1 :11

1 :4

N

N

N

5 GS Mofako Batanga

56

67

123

0

6

0

3

30

1 :21

1 :41

1 :4

N

Y

N

6 GS Bweme

59

45

104

4

0

5

3

55

1 :12

1 :35

1 :2

N

N

N

7 GS Kilekile

17

17

34

0

0

2

2

10

1 :2

1 :17

1 :4

N

N

N

8 GS Ikoi

71

63

134

2

0

2

2

41

1 :34

1 :67

1 :3

N

N

N

9 GS Dikome

47

42

89

2

3

0

4

32

1 :18

1 :23

1 :3

N

N

N

10 GS Moboka

32

28

60

0

0

2

3

10

1 :30

1 :20

1 :6

N

N

N

11 GS Meangwe I

40

50

90

0

3

0

5

60

1 :30

1 :18

1 :2

N

Y

N

12 GS Toko

46

53

99

2

0

0

8

60

1 :50

1 : 13

1 : 2

N

N

N

13 *GNS Toko

8

7

15

0

0

2

2

7

1 :8

1 :8

1 :2

N

N

N

14 GS Betika

20

13

33

0

0

2

3

10

1 :17

1 :11

1 :4

N

N

N

15 GS Dibonda

44

47

91

2

0

2

3

50

1 :23

1 :30

1 :2

N

N

N

16 GS Bombangi

35

41

76

0

5

0

3

100

1 :15

1 :25

1 :1

N

N

N

17 GS Lipenja

52

51

103

2

0

4

10

40

1 :17

1 :10

1 :3

N

Y

N

18 *GNS Lipenja

5

5

10

0

0

2

2

7

1 :5

1 :5

1 :1

N

N

N

19 GS Ikenge

   50

59

109

0

0

5

6

25

1 :22

1 :19

1 :5

N

N

N

20 GS Esukotan

29

26

55

0

4

1

7

20

1 :5

1 :8

1 :3

N

N

N

21 GS Nwamoki

10

7

17

0

0

1

1

0

1 :17

1 :17

1 :17

N

N

N

22 GS Itali

17

13

30

0

0

1

1

0

1 :30

1 :30

1 :30

N

N

N

23 GS Ndoi

13

8

21

0

0

1

1

0

1 :21

1 :21

1 :21

N

N

N

Source:  Field Survey Aug. – Sept. 2011                                                   * indicates Nursery Schools

From the analysis of the teachers’ situation for basic education within the municipality, there are eighty six (86) teachers of whom 39% are contract teachers, 30% civil servants and 31% are PTA teachers.

 

Table 8: List of Nursery and Primary Schools Needs

School

Needs

Classroom (Number needed) Pupils’ Desk (Number needed) Tables (number needed) Teachers’ Chairs (number needed) Water point (Y/N) Toilet (Y/N) Fence (Y/N) Teachers

Nursery schools

 

GNS Toko

1

1

1

2

Y

Y

Y

0

GNS Lipenja

1

0

1

2

Y

Y

Y

0

Primary Schools
GS Madie N.T

4

7

6

12

Y

Y

Y

4

GS Madie Ngolo

4

0

6

               12

Y

N

Y

3

GS Boembe Madie III

6

0

6

12

Y

Y

Y

4

GS Banyo

6

7

6

12

Y

Y

Y

3

GS Mofako Batanga

6

32

6

12

Y

N

Y

4

GS Bweme

2

0

6

12

Y

Y

N

3

GS Kilekile

6

7

6

12

Y

Y

Y

4

GS Ikoi Ngolo

4

26

6

12

Y

Y

Y

4

GS Dikome N

4

13

6

12

Y

Y

Y

2

GS Moboka

6

20

6

12

Y

Y

Y

4

GS Meangwe I

6

0

6

12

Y

N

Y

2

GS Toko

4

0

6

12

Y

Y

Y

0

GS Betika

6

36

6

12

Y

Y

Y

3

GS Dibonda

4

0

6

12

Y

Y

N

3

GS Bombangi

6

0

6

12

Y

Y

Y

3

GS Lipenja

6

12

6

12

Y

N

Y

0

GS Ikenge

6

30

6

12

Y

Y

Y

0

GS Esukotan

6

8

6

12

Y

Y

Y

0

GS Nwamoki

6

10

2

2

Y

Y

Y

6

GS Itali

6

10

2

2

Y

Y

Y

6

GS Ndoi

6

10

2

2

Y

Y

Y

6

Total Needs

112

223

116

226

23

19

23

64

Source:  Field Survey Aug. – Sept. 2011.

 

 

 

A needs analysis reveal that 112 additional classrooms, 223 benches and 64 teachers should be put in place to meet the required standards within the basic education sector.

A majority of the schools have semi permanent and temporal structures with very few permanent buildings. Hence, there is need for quality classrooms by renovating existing dilapidated structures while planning for the construction of permanent ones.

 

Secondary Education

There are two secondary schools located in Toko and Madie with one technical school is located in Lipenja. All are public schools.  The total number of students is 315 of which I68 are boys (49%) and 162 girls (51%).Fig 6 &7 below shows enrolment and teachers situation in these schools.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                            Fig 8: Enrolment in Secondary Education                                    Fig 9: Teachers situation in Secondary Education

 

 

School Total Enrolment Classrooms Effective number of teachers Number of desks Classroom/ Pupil ratio Teacher/ Pupil ratio Desk/ Pupil ratio Schools having water points Schools having toilets Schools fenced
Type Boys Girls Total Permanent Semi permanent Temporal Y/N Y/N Y/N
       
GSS Madie Ngolo

59

84

143

1

4

0

5

25

1 :29

1 :29

1 :8

N

Y

N

GSS Toko

77

73

150

1

4

0

5

15

1 :30

1 :30

1 :10

N

Y

N

GTC Lipenja

17

5

22

1

2

0

3

7

1 :7

1 :7

1 :3

N

N

N

Table 9: Enrolment in Secondary Schools

From the analysis in fig 7 above shows that there are thirteen (13) teachers of whom 69% are contract, 23% PTA and 8% Civil servants.

 

Table 10: List of Secondary School Needs

School

Needs

Classroom and workshops Desks Teachers’ Tables (No. needed) Teachers’ Chairs Water point Toilet Fence Teachers
(No. needed) (No. needed) (No. needed) (Y/N) (Y/N) (Y/N)
GSS Madie Ngolo

3

47

5

10

Y

N

Y

5

GSS Toko

3

60

5

10

Y

N

Y

5

GTC Lipenja

1

4

3

6

Y

Y

Y

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

From the findings, all the schools do not have have access to basic social facilities such as water points and fences. However, GSS Toko and Madie have pit latrines.  There is the need to construct a toilet in GTC Lipenja and a water point in each of the schools. It was also discovered that all the schools have limited permanent structures to accommodate a convenient learning environment hence there is urgent need for the construction of classrooms.

 

 

            Fig 10: Need of benches in Secondary Education


 

Public Health

Toko municipality has four (4) health centres (3 Government and 1 Private of the Presbyterian Church in Cameroon). The government health centres are highly understaffed with non existent health services such as consultations and drug administration especially in Toko; despite the permanent structures that have been constructed. All minor medical problems are handled by the Presbyterian health center in Madie, Lipenja and Dikome while serious cases are transported to Mundemba, Ekondo Titi and Kumba hospitals. The poor road network contributes to the death of several patients before they reach nearby hospitals.

From available records at the Presbyterian health unit, less than 5% of the population do their HIV and AIDs status tests. Only pregnant women are tested during maternal check up in order to know their status to prevent transmission from mother to child during delivery.

The table below gives the situation of the health institutions within the municipality.

 

 

 

Table 11: Consolidation of data on health

Village

Population

Realisation

General information of centre

Personnel

Infrastructure

Equipments

Furnishing

 Health data

Centre Mgt

Enterprise

Source of finance

Year of constuction

Health area

health district

Status of the centre

Year of creation

Doctor

SRN

Asst. Nurse

Nurse aid

Ward servant

others

No. of buildings

State

Bed

Lab.

Maternity

Pharmacy

Refrigerator

Water point

Latrine

Reaforestation

Fence

Waste disposal system

Doctor’s residence

Level of sanitary cover

Level of visit

Average No. of births

Level of Vacccination cover

Epidemic

Existence of mgt committee

existence of health committee

         

(i)

             

Good

Avge

Bad

 

(Y/N)

(Y/N)

(Y/N)

 

(Y/N)

(Y/N)

(Y/N)

(Y/N)

(ii)

(Y/N)

%

%

%

%

 

(Y/N)

(Y/N)

Madie 1 Ngolo

700

PCC

PCC

1972

Toko

Mundemba

Private

1984

0

1

1

1

0

0

1

 

Y

 

12

Y

Y

Y

2

 Y

Y

N

N

N

N

 60

 80

 60

80

N

N

N

Lipenja

500

GOC

GOC

1983

Toko

Mundemba

Public

1983

0

2

1

0

0

0

1

   

Y

10

N

Y

Y

1

N

Y

N

N

N

N

40

60

50

80

N

Y

Y

Dikome Ngolo

297

GOC

GOC

1996

Toko

Mundemba

Public

1996

0

1

1

0

0

0

1

 

Y

 

10

N

Y

N

1

N

Y

N

N

N

N

60

35

40

80

N

Y

Y

Toko

 811

GOC

GOC

2010

Toko

Mundemba

Public

2010

0

1

0

0

0

0

1

 Y

   

10

N

Y

N

1

Y

Y

N

N

N

Y

80

0

0

80

N

N

N

Total

1511

             

0

5

3

1

0

0

4

     

42

     

5

                         

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fig 11: Situation of Health Personnel

The analysis above indicates that out of the three staffs in Madie, one is a SRN while one is an assistant nurse and the other is a nurse aid.  Toko on the other hand has only one staff and he is a SRN. Lipenja has two SRN and one assistant nurse while Dikome on the other hand has one SRN and one assistant nurse. There is no medical doctor in the municipality.   With an estimated population of 13, 318 inhabitants there is need to recruit more personnel that would offer basic health services (laboratory, maternity, pharmacy) in the council area. Another needed priority action is the constitution of functional health committees.

 

Environment and Nature Protection

There are natural sites with ecological importance, like forests, carves and waterfalls. These natural sites provide basic habitat for the numerous wildlife that are found within the municipality.

In recent years, the natural environment has witnessed a deterioration of existing ecosystems, loss of bio-diversity and decrease in soil fertility as a result of indiscriminate clearance of forests in favour of farmlands, poor farming practices, unsustainable felling of trees for fuel and construction. Furthermore, there are several landslides especially during the rainy season which also contributes to environmental degradation.

 

 

 

            Water Resources

Water supply in the area is mainly through community water schemes. There are pipe borne water schemes in four villages within the municipality. The tables below show the distribution of water resources in the Municipality.

Table 12: Diagnosis of Water Situation in the Municipality

Village Population (a) Work type Realization Structure Characteristics Functionality
Scan water Portable water supply CDE Enterprise Source of financing Fixed date Water capturing Number of water towers Number of bore holes Number of public taps Number of connections Capacity Drive lengths Functional Adduction Water tower / Functional capturing Number of non fuctional bore holes Number of non functional public taps Management
            (i)         in litre (in m) (O/N)       (ii)
Toko 811 N Y N Helvetas/ GTZ Helvetas/ GTZ 2010   0 1 7 0     N 0 0 6 N
Madie New Town 365 N Y N Helvetas/ GTZ Helvetas/ GTZ 1989   0 0 2 0     N 0 0 0 N
Madie Ngolo   700  N  Y  N Helvetas/ GTZ  Helvetas/ GTZ  1997    0  0  8  0      N  0  0  1  N
Meangwe 1 600 N Y N Helvetas/ GTZ Helvetas/ GTZ 2010   0 0 2 0 0   N 0 0 2 N

                                                                                                                                                  

 

 

Table 13: Diagnosis on Bore Hole

Village Population (a) REALISATION STRUCTURE CHARACTERISTICS State of work MAINTENANCE QUANTITY AND QUALITY OF WATER
Enterprise Source of financing Starting date Anti mire Area Cleanliness Bore hole diameter Bore hole depth Water height Pompe type Mark Functioning Cause of breakdown Exploitation of work The existence of a management committee CG Functioning Sufficient quantity Water quality Water borne diseases
      (O/N) (O/N) (m) (m) (m) (i)   (O/N) (O/N) (ii) (iii) (O/N) (O/N) (O/N) (iv) (O/N)
Toko  811  GOC  GOC  2010  Y Y m m m  –  – Y N Y Y Good N

 

          Energy Resources

There are two communities with thermal generators and none is functional. The Municipality has a good number of waterfalls that can be used to generate electricity. The communities within the municipality do not have the financial capacity to purchase thermal generators and poor management of existing generators makes smooth and daily running difficult.  100% of the inhabitants within the municipality use the local bush lamp for lighting of their homes. Kerosene for bush lamps is purchased from Mundemba and is relatively scarce during the rainy season.

The table below shows the distribution of thermal energy.

 

 

 

 

 

Table 14: Diagnosis of Electricity   

Village Population REALISATION STRUCTURAL CHARACTERISTICS FUNCTIONALITY  GEOGRAPHIC CONTACTS OF THE STRUCTURES
Enterprise Source of finance Date of start of operation Nature Neighbourhood  served No. of transformers No. of installed poles Average  tension length Low tension length No. of connections Functionality of the network No. of non functional transformers No. of non functional poles (bad or fallen) Existence of a  group of technicians (committee for the extension of connection) Existence of management committee Generator Transformer 1
      (i)  Y/N     (in km) (in Km)   (Y/N)       (ii) X Y Z X Y Z
Toko

811

PIB

Gov’t

2004

Bad

Y

0

12

0

0

5

N

0

1

N

N

5.0404

9.1337

895m

N/A

N/A

N/A

Meangwe 1

600

PIB

GOC

2004

Bad

Y

0

5

0

0

3

N

0

0

N

N

5.0404

9.1337

895m

N/A

N/A

N/A

Madie Ngolo

700

TOC

TOC

2010

Bad

 N

0

0

0

0

 0

N

0

0

N

N

5.0127

9.2139

917m

N/A

N/A

N/A

v  Toko & Meangwe I share the same generator.

v  Electricity supply in Madie Ngolo uses non stahdard poles (from Indian Bamboo).

v  There is need to extend the electricity network from Mundemba to Toko in order to increase on economic activities of the area and reduce rural exodus of inhabitants especially the youth.

 

 

Forestry and Wildlife

Toko municipality is located within the dense equatorial forest of the Congo Basin. It has three distinct vegetation types consisting of the wet and dry equatorial rain forests.

There is high rate of illegal exploitation of timber resources especially by known licensed exploiters for fuel and the construction of houses. The commonly exploited species in the council area includes; black and white afara, iroko, mahogany, small leaf and bobinga. Exploitation of NTFPs (Non Timber Forest Products) is a common practice among women in the area whose harvests include: njangsa, bush pepper, bitter cola, bush onion, eru and some medicinal species.

There are three forest reserves within the municipality which protect an extensive area (about 60% of total land space) of habitat for wildlife. These include the Rumpi Hills, Korup National Park and the Christian Philanthropic Community Forest Reserve. As a result of high rate of deforestation of the non protected land, vegetation cover has greatly suffered. Trapping and hunting has also reduced the quantity and specie type of wildlife within the municipality. Some of the animal species includes; elephants, bush pigs, red tail monkeys, alligators, antelopes, cane rat and crocodiles. Other species such as porcupine, pangolin, pythons, alligator, deer, monkey, and squirrel are mostly hunted in the secondary forests and farmlands by local hunters who usually set locally designed traps.

 

      Table 15:  Forest reserve in the council area

No. Forest Reserve Number of Hectares
1 Korup National Park 49.105
2 Rumpi Hills 5.445
3 Christian Philanthropic Community Forest 4.928

         Source: MINFOF Buea (Sept. 2011)

 

 

 

                                         Fig 12: Distribution of Forest Reserves

 

Financial Institutions

There is only one financial institution within the municipality which is called the Village Bank that was implanted with assistance from the Rumpi Area Participatory Development Project. Since it was handed over to a local management committee it has seldom offered any banking services to its members and the entire Toko population.

 

A majority of the population, especially women are members of local njangi groups which are generally constituted on tribal lines or professional interests. These njangi houses are active in savings and loans and other self help activities. The absence of formal financial institutions within the municipality has adverse effects on the potentials for vibrant business climate as well as on the tax base of the council.

 

Territorial Administration and Decentralization

There is a Divisional Officer who coordinates and ensures the smooth functioning of technical services within the municipality. He is assisted by an assistant. Together they work with village heads to among others settle all sorts of disputes.

There is a Gendarmerie Brigade in Toko headed by a Brigade Commander who ensures law and order as well support the council during tax recovery missions. Like several services which are effectively present within the municipality, they are under staffed and have no equipment to facilitate their smooth functioning.

There no Police Post within the municipality.

 

Housing and Urban Development

All the houses constructed within the municipality are of plank with zinc roofs (semi permanent infrastructure where some are in good state while others are in bad state) and have no building permits. Toko council does not have a town planning service or a master plan for any of its villages.

Land Use: Land in the municipality is used for perennial and annual crop production; settlements, access roads, play grounds, market areas, and construction of government and private services and religious structures.

Land Tenure System:  Land within the municipality is acquired mainly through inheritance but can be purchased from another family. Traditional Councils working with the Chief can also apportion land for development purposes. Women do not inherit land but can purchase and own land.

Tourism and Leisure

The tourist industry is not developed in Toko municipality. However, many tourist potentials exist that can be exploited. The rich culture of the people exhibited in traditional dances during festivals and national celebrations can attract tourists. In addition, the beautiful and exquisite topography, the Rumpi Hills, Korup National Park and numerous waterfalls and carves can boost the local economy of the council if properly exploited. The road network to Toko however presents numerous challenges to this sector.

 

Arts and Culture

Toko municipality has three major tribes all of whom belong to the main Orocko people who are descendants of Ngoe. These tribes which include the Ngolos, Batangas and Bakokos speak similar languages, dancing and also inter marry. Their shared cultural values are further portrayed through their beliefs, music, dressing, housing and food. This sector can be of great importance to the people if a cultural plan is elaborated.

 

Transport

The transport system in the Toko municipality is tremendously underdeveloped. Only four wheel drive vehicles ply the main access road that links Toko to Mundemba. Motor bikes are a surer means of transport in that they can create tracks within the road. Trekking accounts for more than 90% of inter village movement thus making movement within the municipality very difficult and expensive. The topography and the bad nature of the roads especially during the raining seasons make moving a nightmare.

 

Public Works

 

Road network in Toko Municipality

 

Earth roads linking Mundemba and Toko with a side road to Lipenja are not regularly maintained thus rendering them impassable especially during the rainy season.  The council equally does not have road maintenance equipment. Problems identified by the community include poor drainage systems, poor road maintenance, poor construction of culverts and bridges.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Higher Education

Toko municipality has no institution for higher education beyond the secondary level. Students who complete secondary education move to Mundemba or beyond to obtain higher education or vocational and professional training.

 

Agriculture and Rural Development

Agriculture represents the back bone of the local economy employing about 95% of inhabitants within the municipality. The highly fertile loam soils and favorable climatic conditions have favored a cultivation of a variety of both food and cash crops in the municipality such as cocoa, oil palm, cassava, plantains, banana, pepper, maize, egusi cocoyam and vegetables. Despite the fertile soils, yields are still very low due to the poor methods of farming, high cost of inputs such as fertilizers, difficult access to improved planting materials, pests and disease attacks on cocoa and cocoyam. Farmers in this sector also suffer from unscrupulous License Buying Agents (LBAs) who exploit the usually helpless nature of the inhabitants of the council area.

Livestock, fisheries and animal industries 

Animal species which are domesticated includes pigs, sheep, goats and fowls. These animals roam freely within villages and are usually caught when ready for use during ceremonies and for periodic home consumption.

There are several challenges within this sector including; absence of veterinary personnel, facilities and services which gives room for bacterial diseases such as swine erysipelas in pigs and cocsidiasis in poultry.

Limited fishing activities for household consumption are carried out in the streams and rivers.

Women Empowerment and the Promotion of the Family 

There is no existing structure that particularly caters for the interests of women of the girl child. A Home Economic Centre (CEAC) has been recently approved to be based in Toko and two sewing machines and some buckets have arrived Toko but there are no staffs or a convenient structure to host the centre..

There is need to send staff and related equipment in order to render the center functional.

Youth and Citizen Education

The delegation of youth affairs is not represented within the municipality; hence youths of the council area do not have access to youth programs which are offered by the Ministry of Youth Affairs. Also, the council has no specific programs for the youths.

 

Sports and Physical Education

There are no sporting activities organized beyond inter school sports. The council does not organize activities that specifically benefits the youth within this sector.

 

Employment and Vocational Training

There is need for a vocational training centre in the Municipality.  Most of the youths go out of the council area (Buea and Mundemba) in order to acquire professional training.

 

 

 

Small and Medium-size Enterprises, Social Economy and Handicrafts

The municipality has very few business activities such as provision stores and road side markets. However, an American Company called SG SOC has recently taken shop and opened palms nursery in Lipenja which is sure to create the first enterprise within the municipality. SG SOC will certainly create employment for Toko children as well as provide income for the council through payment of taxes.

 

Social Affairs

There is no infrastructure in this sector despite the presence of vulnerable persons in the council area. Most of the vulnerable persons are handicapped (unable to walk) and have never received any support neither from the council nor the delegation of social affairs in Mundemba. The problems identified include limited access to social services and limited knowledge on available social services and benefits.

 

Scientific Research and Innovation

The delegation is not represented in the division thus the rich variety in tree types with potentials medicinal values in the municipality are catered for by the conservation institutions. The local population also extracts and treats medicinal plants (kanda stick) for health issues. There is need to improve on this sector.

 

Industry, Mines and Technological Development  

This sector is not represented in the council area. There is no mining or industry that is located in the area.

 

Posts and Telecommunications

There are neither radio nor television signals within the municipality.  The municipality is in desperate situation as far as this sector is concerned. There are no CAMTEL, MTN and Orange mobile telephone networks hence communication is extremely difficult. There are equally no postal services within the municipality.

 

Labour and Social Security

The only employment opportunities within the municipality are from the government through schools and the health institutions including that of the PCC. There is no delegation of Labour and social Security in the municipality.

There is high rate of unemployment leading to increase rural exodus.

State Property and Land Tenure

The municipality has several government buildings harboring government technical services, schools, health center and other social facilities. However some of these buildings are dilapidated and need renovation.

A majority of the population do not possess land certificates resulting to several cases of land disputes.  Most houses do not have building permits and the council has no resident town planner.

 

 

Commerce

There is one market within the municipality located in Toko which was constructed with financial support from the Rumpi Project. Since its construction in 2008, it has seldom functioned because buyers cannot come to Toko due to the very poor state of roads. The market has under utilized permanent structures where a few women gather every Tuesday in wait for buyers.   Other commercial activities in the council area include very few beer parlour, eating houses, and petty trading stores. Below is the diagnosis of the market situation.

 

 

 

 

Table 16: Diagnosis of Market Infrastructures

Village Type of infrastructure Realisation Characterictic of Project

Equipement existant

Facilities Management
Shop Market/commercial complex Bus station Livestock farm Slaughter house Nursery Others Enterprise Source of finance Year of construction Capacity Nature Market days Present state Counter Shop Shed Butcher’s shop Fish store Cold store Others Water point Latrine Waste treatment system Reaforestation Electricity Speed ramps for handicaps Office Others Management method Existing management committee Monthly income
                     

(i)

(ii)

(iii)

              (Y/N) (Y/N) (Y/N) (Y/N) (Y/N) (Y/N) (Y/N) (Y/N) (iv) (Y/N  
Toko

N

Y

N

N

N

N

 

Rumpi

Rumpi

2008

100

periodic

Tuesdyas

Good

 12 0 52 N N N   N N N N N N N N Direct N  


PROBLEM ANALYSIS: WOMEN EMPOWERMENT AND THE PROMOTION OF THE FAMILY

 

 

High dependence rate of women

High rate of poverty among women

Violence against women

Unfavorable decision taken for women

High prevalence of early birth for the girl child

Marginalization of women and children

Weak economic power of women

Inadequate representation and participation of women in development and political issues

Ignorance of women on their rights

Low level of education of women

Few women entrepreneurs

Male domination

Women are not educated on their rights

Under scholarisation of the girl child

V

 

LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: WOMEN EMPOWERMENT AND THE PROMOTION OF THE FAMILY

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Decision making by women improved At least 50% of women take decisions on matters that concern them by 2020. – Testimonies- Administrative reports Negative cultural practices against women reduced.
Specific objective Marginalization of women and children reduced By 2015 at least 50% of women are empowered personally, economically, socially, culturally and politically. – Administrative reports-  Testimonies Male subordination reduced
Results 1. Economic power of women increased At least 40% of women embark on profitable income generating activities by 2015. – Business records- Administrative reports Favourable economic conditions
2. Representation and participation of women in development and political issues increased. By 2015, at least 50% of members in development and political committees are women –  Administrative reports-Testimonies – Negative socio-cultural biases.-  Inferiority complex of women reduced.
3. Ignorance of women on their rights reduced By 2015, at least 50% of the women in the municipalities know their rights and apply them – Testimonies-  Reports Male subordination reduced
  4. Level of education for women increased At least 20% of young girls enroll in schools at all levels yearly. School enrollment registers Negative cultural practices reduced
Activities Quantity Place

Cost (cfa)

R1. Economic power of women increased      
1.1 Train women on various income generating activities 49 trainings All the villages 5,000,000
1.2 Support women with capital to start income generating activities 2000 women Selected from all the villages 100,000,000
R2 Representation and participation of women in development and political issues increased      
2.1 Sensitize women on the importance of their participation in development issues 49 All villages 2,500,000
2.2 Institute a quota system in membership of development and political committees 49 All villages 1,500,000
R3 Ignorance of women on their right reduced      
3.1 Sensitize women on their rights 49 All villages 2,500,000
R4 Level of education of women increased      
4.1 Sensitize the population on the importance of the education of the girl child 49 All villages 2,500,000
4.2 Award scholarship to girls at all level of education 200 All villages 10,000,000
Total     124.000.000
               

 

 

 

PROBLEM ANALYSIS: PUBLIC WORKS

 

Limited circulation of persons and goods

High cost of transportation

Overloading of persons and clandestine vehicles

Poor transportation of agricultural products

High rate of accident

High cost of transportation

Insufficient farm to market roads

Poor conditions of existing roads

Poor state of culverts and bridges

Poor maintenance of culverts and bridges

No maintenance committees

Poor community mobilization

Insufficient funds

Poor maintenance of existing roads

Poor community mobilization

No maintenance committee


 

LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: PUBLIC WORKS

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Circulation of goods and persons increased By 2020 transport means increase in the municipality yearly by at least 15% –          Traffic counts-          Testimonies Stable economic  environment
Specific objective Rural roads network improved By 2020, at least 30% of the communities  are accessible all seasons –          Transport records-          Testimonies-          Visits –          Community collaboration-          Stable economic environment
Results 1. Farm to market roads increased By 2020, at least 40km of roads constructed, regularly maintained and accessible all seasons. –          Administrative reports-          Visits –          Community collaboration-          Stable economic environment
2. Conditions of existing roads improved At least 30km of existing roads are regularly maintained and accessible all seasons by 2015 –          Visits-          Administrative reports Community collaboration
3. State of culverts and bridges improved 25%  of broken down culvers and bridges are rehabilitated and used by 2015 –          Visits-          Testimonies Community collaboration
Activities Quantity Place

Cost (cfa)

R1. Farm to market roads increased      
1.1 Conduct studies 2 2 villages 2,000.000
1.2 Construct new roads 40 km 2 villages 2.800,000.000
1.3 Maintain new roads 40 km 2 villages 40,000.000
R2. Conditions of existing roads improved      
2.1 Conduct studies 2 studies 2 villages 2,000,000
2.2 Rehabilitate roads 40 km 2 villages 300,000,000
2.3 Maintain roads 30 km 2 villages 40,000,000
R3. State of culvert and bridges improved      
3.1 Conduct studies 2 2 villages 5.000.000
3.2 Rehabilitate culverts and bridges 46 2 villages 30.000.000
Total     3.219.000.000
               

 

PROBLEM ANALYSIS: ENERGY RESOURCES

 

High rate of insecurity

Poor lighting of the municipality

Poor storage of perishable foods

Inadequate economic activities

Insufficient reading by students at night

Poor access to electricity supply

Non functional thermal electricity plants in Toko and Madie Ngolo

Poor maintenance of thermal electricity plants

No connection to the national electricity supply network (AES SONEL)

Non functional community generators

Installation of community generators

Poor lobbying

 

LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: ENERGY RESOURCES

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Lighting of communities improved By 2020, at least 30% of communities in the municipality are regularly supplied with electricity –          Public interviews-          Administrative reports-          Observations Favorable economic and political environment
Specific objective Access to electricity supply increased At least 20% of the population use electricity for lighting of their houses and businesses by 2015 –          Business records-          Interviews Favorable economic and political environment
Results 1. Thermal electricity plants in Toko and Madie Ngolo made functional By 2015, two thermal electricity plants in Toko and Madie Ngolo are maintained regularly, and supply electricity throughout. –          Observations-          Testimonies-          Administrative reports Stable economic environment
2.   Community generators increased and functional At least 20 community generators installed and functional by 2015. –          Testimonies-          Observations Community collaboration
3. Connection to the national electricity supply network (AES SONEL) enhanced By 2015, Toko town has functional AES SONEL installations –          Administrative report-          Public interviews Stable political environment
Activities Quantity Place

Cost (cfa)

R1 Thermal electricity plants in Toko and Madie Ngolo made functional.      
1.1 Rehabilitate thermal electricity plants 2 Toko and Madie Ngolo 2,000,000
1.2 Maintain thermal electricity plants 2 Took and Madie Ngolo 2,000,000
R2 Community generators increased and functional      
2.1 Install community generators 20 Bweme, Mobenge, Bekita, Bokuba, Iboka, Meangwe I, Ngamoki I, Mapanja, Mofako, Drenge, Dipundu, Tombe, Banyo, Ndio, Debonda Koroki, Masaka, Bombangi, Lipenja, Kilekile, Meyeka 200,000,000
2.2 Maintain community generators 20 20,000,000
R3 Connections to the national electricity supply network supply (AES SONEL) enhanced      
3.1 Lobby for the installation of AES SONEL 1 Toko 1,000,000
Total     225.000.000
               

 

 

PROBLEM ANALYSIS:   WATER RESOURCES

 

High cost to treat related water borne diseases

High prevalence of water borne diseases

Women and children walk long distances to fetch potable water

Poor access to portable water

Inadequate potable water schemes

Non functional pipe borne water supply

Insufficient treatment of water on community wells

Contanmination of available water sources

Insufficient community participation

Poor mobilization of communities

Limited knowledge on hygiene and sanitation

Poor maintenance

Insufficient funds

No maintenance committee put in place

 

LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: WATER RESOURCES

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Prevalence of water born diseases reduced By 2020, the  number of reported cases of water borne diseases reduce by at least 50% in all the communities with portable water –          Health centre records-          Testimonies Water pollution reduced
Specific objective Access to potable water increased At least 10 communities have  access to potable water by 2020 –          Administrative reports-          Visits-          Testimonies Favorable policy framework
Results 1. Potable water schemes increased At least 10 communities have functional portable water schemes by 2020 –          Site visits-          Administrative reports An enabling economic and political conditions
2. Functional water schemes increased All existing water schemes are maintained regularly and functional by 2015. –          Site visits-          Administrative reports An enabling economic and political conditions
3. Contamination of available water sources reduced. At least 20% of water sources in the municipality are good for drinking by 2015 –          Testimonies-          Site visits-          Council reports Community collaboration
Activities Quantity Place

Cost (cfa)

R1 Potable water schemes increased      
1.1 Conduct studies 46 Bweme, Mobenge, Ikoti I, Ikoti 2, Bekita, Bokuba,  Meangwe I, Bonabeanga, Basan,  Nwamoki, Iyombo, Ikoi, Dikome, Iwasa,  Ngamoki I, Moboka, Madie, Madie Newtown,Madie III, Boeme, Mapanja, Ngamoki II, Mofako, Dienge, Dipundu, Tombe, Banyo, Ndoi, Itali,  Debonda Koroki, Debonda mesina, Masaka, Bombangi, Babia bangam Ipongi, Bareka II, Lobem Batanga, Baromba, Bereka I, Manya, Lipenja, Ikenge, Esukotan, Iyoe, Illondo, Killekile, Mayaka, Esoki, Lowe 46,000,000
1.2 Submit project proposal for external funding 46 Transport200,000
1.3 Construct water schemes 46 1,840,000,000
R2 Functional water schemes increased 3 Toko, Madie Newtown, Madie Ngolo  
2.1 Mobilized community contribution 3 Toko, Madie Newtown, Madie Ngolo 600,000
2.2 Create and equip water maintenance committees 3 Toko, Madie Newtown, Madie Ngolo 1,500,000
2.3 Rehabilitate water schemes 3 Toko, Madie Newtown, Madie Ngolo 90,000,000
R3. Contamination of available water sources reduced      
3.1 Sensitize the communities on Hygiene  and sanitation 49 All villages 25,000,000
3.2 Enact and implement laws on use of sources of water 49 All villages
R4 Treatment of water in community  improved      
4.1  Institute levies for water   Toko
4.2  Train caretakers 49 Toko 1.000,000
Total     2.004.300.000
               

 

 

 

 

 

PROBLEM ANALYSIS: SECONDARY EDUCATION

 

Low scholarisation rate at secondary school level

High rate of school drop outs

High rate of illiteracy

Poor performance of school

Limited access to quality secondary education

Insufficient qualified teachers

Insufficient infrastructures (classrooms, latrines, water points, fences, play grounds)

Limited equipment  and Limited enrolment of students


LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: SECONDARY EDUCATION

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Global objective Illiteracy rate at the secondary level reduced By 2020, literacy rate increased by at least 20% in the municipality –          Administrative and management reports Favorable policy framework
Specific objective Access to quality secondary education increased At least 60% of pupils from primary school have access to secondary education and at least 60% obtain 4 “O” level subjects or more by 2015 –          GCE ‘O’ level results-          Administrative and management report Favorable economic and political environment
Results 1. Qualified teachers increased By 2015 each secondary schools have at least 10 qualified teachers –          Transfer decision-          Administrative and management report Favorable economic and political environment
2. Infrastructure increased All secondary and technical schools have at least five classroom blocks, a water point, a latrine, a library and workshop  by 2015. –          Visit to schools-          Administrative and management reports Favorable economic condition
3. Equipment increased By 2015, all classrooms constructed are equipped with desks , chairs, tables & blackboards –          Visits to schools-          Inventory records Favorable economic condition
Activities Quantity Place

Cost (cfa)

R1 Qualified teachers increased      
1.1 Lobby for the transfer of trained teachers 10 GSS Madie Ngole 5GSS Toko 5 Three trips to Buea and Yaounde300,000
R2 Infrastructure increased      
2.1 Construct classrooms and workshops 7 GSS Madie Ngolo 3GSS Toko 3GTC Lipenja  1 workshop 63,000,000
2.2 Construct latrines 3 GSS Madie Ngolo 3GSS Toko 3GTC Lipenja  1 workshop 10,500,000
2.3 Construct water points 3 GSS Madie Ngolo 3GSS Toko 3GTC Lipenja  1 workshop 6,000,000
2.4 Construct fences 3 GSS Madie Ngolo 3GSS Toko 3GTC Lipenja  1 workshop 12,000,000
R3  Equipment increased 4    
3.1 Supply desks 111 GSS Madie Ngolo 47GSS Toko 60GTC Lipenja 4 6,660,000
3.2 Supply teachers tables and chairs 6 lots of chairs and tables GSS Madie NgoloGSS TokoGTC Lipenja 1,500,000
Total     99.960.000
               

 

PROBLEM ANALYSIS: BASIC EDUCATION

 

High illiteracy rate

Poor result at public examinations

High rate of school drop outs

Juvenile delinquency

Limited access to quality basic education

Insufficient qualified teaching staff

Insufficient school infrastructure (classrooms, latrines, libraries, water points, staff residence

Insufficient school equipment / materials (benches, didactic materials)

Limited financial resources

Inadequate transfer of qualified staff


LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: BASIC EDUCATION

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Global objective Illiteracy rate at the basic level  reduced By 2020 at least 70% of children (half of them girls between the ages of 12 – 14) obtain F.S.L.C –          Reports of the inspectors of basic education-          F.S.L.C results –          Favorable policy framework-          Favorable economic and political environment
Specific objective Access to quality basic education increased By the year 2020 at least 80% of the children (half of them girls) within the municipality have access to quality basic education –          F.S.L.C results-          Administrative and management reports –          Favorable policy framework-           Favorable economic and political environment
Results 1. Qualified teachers increased At least 90% of nursery and primary schools have at least four functional qualified teachers by 2015. –          Transfer decisions-          Administrative and management reports –          Favorable policy framework-           Favorable economic and political environment
2. School infrastructure increase (classroom, latrines, libraries, water points, staff residence) At least 70% of nursery and primary schools in the municipality have at least four classrooms, a water point, a latrine and a library by 2015. –          Visit to schools-          Administrative and management report Favorable economic conditions
  3.  School equipment / materials increased By 2015 at least 70% of classrooms constructed are fully equipped with desks, chairs, tables, blackboards and required didactic materials yearly.   –          Visit to schools-          Administrative and management report Favorable economic conditions
Activities Quantity Place

Cost (cfa)

R1 Qualified teachers increased      
1.1 Lobby for the transfer of trained teachers 46 trained teachers needed GS: Madue Newtown, Madie, Ngolo, Boembi Madie III, Banyo, Mofako, Batamga, Bweme, Kilekile, Ikoi Ngolo, Dikome N, Moboka, Meangwe I, Toko, Betika, Dibonda, Bombangi, Lipenja, Ikenge, Esukotan Five trips to Buea and Yaounde 500,000
R2 School infrastructure increased      
2.1  Construct classrooms 94 GNS: 1 Toko, 1 LipenjaGS: Madei newtown 4, Madie Ngolo 4, Boembe Madie III 6, Banyo 6, Mofako, Batanga 6, Bweme 2, Kilekile 6, Ikoi Ngolo 4, Dikome 45, Maboka 6, Meangwe I 65, Toko 4, Betika 65, Dibonda 4, Bombangi 6, Lipenja 6, Ikenge 6, Esukotan 6.   752,000,000
2.2 Construct latrines 23 GNS: Toko, LipenjaGS Boembe Madie IIIBanyo, Dikome N, Moboka, Meangwe I, Toko, Betikas, Dibonda 35,000,000
2.3 Construct water points 23 All nursery and primary schools 40,000,000
2.4 Construct fences 23 All nursery and primary schools 40,000,000
R3  School equipment / materials increase      
3.1  Supply Desks 193 GNS: Toko 1GS: Madie Newtown 7, Banyo 7, Mofako Batanga 32, Kilekile 7, Ikoi Ngole 26, Dikome N 13, Mobota 20, Betika 36, Lipenka 12, Ikenge 30, Esukotan 8 11,580,000
3.2  Supply didactic materials 23 lots (assorted) All schools 20,000,000
3.3  Supply teachers tables and chairs 23 lots of Chairs and Tables All schools 10,000,000
Total     909.080.000
               

 

 

PROBLEM ANALYSIS: PUBLIC HEALTH

 

Drop in household income

High rate of rural exodus

High death rate

Poor health status

High cost of health treatment

Limited access to quality health care services

High infant mortality rate

High prevalence of diseases

Inadequate health infrastructure

Insufficient funds

Insufficient health equipment (beds, delivery kits, laboratory equipment)

Limited access to quality and affordable essential drugs

Insufficient qualified health personnel

Uneven distribution of health equipment

Few pro-pharmacies


LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: PUBLIC HEALTH

Strategy

Indicators

Sources of Verification

Assumptions

Level Formulation
Global objective Health status improved By 2015, the death rate reduces by a least 30% each year. –          Health centre records-          Testimonies –          Economic and political stability.-          Epidemic reduced
Specific objective Access to quality health services improved By 2015 at least 60% of the population have access to quality health services –          Health centre records-          Testimonies Cooperation of stakeholders
Results 1. Health infrastructure increased By 2015, all health centers created are constructed according to required specifications –          Visit to health centers-          Health centre reports Favorable economic and political environment
2. Health equipment increased (beds, delivery beds and kits, laboratory equipment etc) By 2020, all health centers have at least 50% of required basic equipment –          Visit to health centers.-          Inventory records Favorable economic and political environment
3.  Access to quality and affordable essential drugs increased All health centers have pro-pharmacies with regular supply of essential drugs by 2015 –          Visit to health centre and pro-pharmacy-          Testimonies Favorable economic and political environment
4.  Qualified health personnel increased By 2015 all centers have at least 3 functional qualified staff –          Health centre reports-          Transfer decisions Favorable policy framework
 Activities Quantity Place

Cost (cfa)

R1 Health infrastructure increased      
1.1 Renovate health centre 2 Dikome Ngolo & Lipenja 50.000.000
R2 Health equipment increased      
2.1 Supply normal beds 20 Dikome Ngolo & Lipenja 10.000.000
2.2 Supply delivery beds 4 Dikome Ngolo & Lipenja 2.000.000
2.3 Supply delivery kits   Dikome Ngolo & Lipenja 2.000.000
2.4 Supply laboratory equipment      
R3. Access to quality and affordable essential drugs increased      
3.1  Rehabilitate pharmacy 2 pharmacy Dikome Ngolo & Lipenja 10,000,000frs
3.2 Train local pharmacies 2 pharmacy Attendants Dikome Ngolo & Lipenja 500,000frs
R4. Qualified health personnel increased      
4.1  Lobby for the transfer of qualified staff 1 Assistant nurse1 nurse aid2 ward servants Toko and Dikome Ngolo & Lipenja 2 trips to Buea and Yaounde200,000frs
Total     74.700.000
               

 


PROBLEM ANALYSIS: COMMERCE

 

Insufficient revenue

Exploitation by traders (Buyam Sellams)

High rate of post harvest losses

High price speculation on products

Poor diversification of commercial activities 

Insufficient market facilities

Poor information on prices of goods in other areas

Insufficient capital

No market information system

Insufficient funds

Limited access to credits


LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: COMMERCE

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Global objective Commercial activities  increased within the municipality By 2014, revenue of the council  from commercial activities increase by at least 15% annually –          Accounts document-          Testimonies Favorable taxation policy
Specific objective Commercial activities increased Diversified commercial activities increase by at least 30% by 2015 –          Visit to business places-          Council revenue reports Enabling business climate
Results 1. Micro – enterprises increased At last 50 lucrative micro – enterprise exists by 2015 –          Visit to market-          Council report Favorable economic environment
2. Marketing of products improved By 2015 at least 70% of the population market their products in appropriate environment and fetch good prices –          Interviews with market masters.-          Radio announcements on market prices Availability of funds ensured
Commercial activities  increased within the municipality By 2014, revenue of the council  from commercial activities increase by at least 15% annually –          Visit to micro-finance-          Testimonies Laws establishing micro-finance institutions respected
Activities Quantity Place

Cost (cfa)

R1 Market facilities increased      
1.1 Construct market 1 Madie 35,000,000
1.2  Maintain markets 2 Madie, Meangwe I 10,000,000
R2 Information on prices of goods in other areas regularly disseminated      
2.1 Disseminate market prices of goods in other areas 4 areas Mundemba, Ekondo Titi, Kumba, Douala 4,000,000
R3. Capital increased      
3.1 Lobby for the creation of micro-finance institution 2 Madie & Lipenja Contact visits1,000,000
Total     59,000,000frs
               

PROBLEM ANALYSIS: AGRICULTURE & RURAL DEVELOPMENT

 

Insufficient availability of food in the municipality

Low income level

Rural exodus

Low agricultural production and productivity  

Pests and diseases attach on cocoa (black pod)

Insufficient use of improved planting materials

Poor farming practices

Limited access to improved planting materials

Poor farm maintenance

Limited access to fertilizers

Limited use of fungicides and pesticides

Limited use of fertilizers (organic and inorganic)

High rate of post harvest loss

Insufficient technical knowledge

Limited knowledge on post harvest losses

Limited access to post harvest facilities


LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: AGRICULTURE & RURAL DEVELOPMENT

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Global objective Agricultural products regularly available in the municipality Varieties of agricultural products available in the municipality all cropping seasons by 2015 –          Administrative reports-          Testimonies Favorable climatic conditions
Specific objective Agricultural production and productivity increased By 2015 at least 40% of farmers increase their yields by at least 10% yearly –          Farm visits-          Farm records-          Administrative reports Epidemic outbreak reduced
Results 1. Pests and diseases attack on cocoa (black pod) reduced At least 20% reduction in losses due to pests and diseases attack by 2015 –          Farm records / visits-          Administrative reports Favorable prices for fungicides and pesticides
2. Use of improved planting materials increased By 2013 at least 40% of farmers use improved planting materials yearly and experience an increase in yields, –          Farm records-          Administrative report Timely availability of improved planting materials
3.  Use of fertilizers increased (organic and inorganic) By 2015, at  least 30% of farmers use organic and inorganic fertilizers and increase their yields by at least 10% yearly. –          Farm records-          Administrative reports Favorable prices for inorganic fertilizers
4.  Farming practices improved By 2014 at least 30% of farmers practice improved farming techniques –          Farm visit administrative reports Bush fires reduced
  5. Post harvest losses reduced By 2014 at least 30% of farmers reduce post harvest losses by at least 50% –          Administrative reports-          Interviews Rural road network improved
Activities Quantity Place

Cost (cfa)

R1. Pests and diseases attack on cocoa (black pods) reduced      
1.1 Train farmers on pests and disease control 12 trainings All the villages 10,000,000
1.2  Organize farmers to have access to fungicides and pesticides 12 meetings All the villages 30,000,000
R2.  Use of improved planting materials increased      
2.1  Sensitize farmers on the use of improved planting materials 12 meetings All the villages 3,000,000
2.2 Distribute improved planting materials to farmers at a subsidize rate (SOWEDA rates) 10 trips500,000 cassava cuttings200000 maize seeds150000 plantain suckers500000 cocoa pots All the villages 250.000.000
R3 Use of fertilizers increased (organic and inorganic)      
3.1 Train farmers on soil improvement techniques 12 trainings All the villages 10,000,000
R4. Farming practices improved      
4,1 Train farmers on improved farming practices 12 trainings All the villages 10,000,000
R5. Post harvest losses reduced      
5.1Train farmers on post harvest losses 12 trainings All the villages 10,000,000
Total     323.000.000
               

 

 

 

Low intake of protein

Low income

Low living standard

High rate of diseases incidents

Low livestock production and productivity  

Poor livestock production practices (free range)

Limited use of improved livestock breeds

Limited use of quality livestock feed

Limited access to improved livestock breeds

Limited knowledge on improved livestock production

Limited access to quality livestock feed

Malnutrition

Limited access to veterinary drugs

PROBLEM ANALYSIS: LIVESTOCK  


LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: LIVESTOCK

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Global objective Nutritional conditions of the population improved At least 40% of the population increase protein intake by at least 10% annually –          Testimonies-          Health records Epidemic outbreak reduced
Specific objective Livestock production and productivity increased By 2020 at least 30% of the population keep livestock and increase production by at least 10% yearly –          Farm records-          Administrative reports Epidemic outbreak reduced
Results 1.  Livestock production practices improved At least 50% of livestock farmers practice improved breeding techniques by 2015 –          Farm visits Epidemic outbreak reduced
2. Use of improved livestock breed increased By 2015 at least 60% of farmers use improved livestock breed and increase the production –          Farm visits-          Administrative reports Favorable economic environment
3. Use of quality livestock feed increased By 2015 at least 50% of farmers use quality livestock feed and increase their production by at least 5% –          Farm records-          Administrative reports Favorable prices for livestock feed
4. Rate of diseases incident reduced By 2015, disease attack on animals reduce by at least 3% annually –          Farm records-          Administrative reports Epidemic outbreak reduced
Activities Quantity Place

Cost (cfa)

R1. Livestock production practices improved      
1.1  Train livestock farmers on improved practices 20 trainings All villages 10,000,000
R2. Use of improved livestock breeds increased      
2.1 Sensitize on improved livestock breeds at subsidized rates 10 trips All villages 200,000
R3  use of quality livestock feed increased      
3.1  Train livestock farmers on the production of livestock feed using local materials 20 trainings All villages 10,000,000
3.2  Link farmers up with livestock feed supplement sales stores 2 trips Kumba 100,000
R4.  Rate of diseases incidents reduced      
4.1 Lobby for the creation of veterinary clinics 2 trips Buea, Yaounde 500,000
4.2  Construct veterinary clinics 2 Toko and Madie Ngole 60,000,000
4.3  Train livestock farmers on disease prevention and treatment 10 All villages 1,000,000
4.4 Create farmer’s Association 15 Toko and Madie Ngole 1.500.000
Total     83.300.000
               

 

PROBLEM ANALYSIS:     FISHERIES

 

Low protein intake

Low income

Low fish production

No fish ponds

 

Poor fish harvesting methods (fish poisoning)

Insufficient knowledge in fish pond establishment

Insufficient technical knowledge

Limited access to improved fishing equipment

Insufficient funds to establish fish ponds

 

LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: FISHERIES 

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Global objective Nutritional intake of the population improved By 2015 at least 30% of the population increases their protein intake by at least 10% yearly. –          Testimonies-          Health records Stable economic environment
Specific objective Fish production and productivity  increased By 2015, the fishing population increase their harvest by at least 3% annually –          Administrative reports Fish poisoning reduced
Results 1.  Sustainable Fish harvesting methods increased By 2015, at least 50% of fish harvesting is done with improved equipment –          Visit to fishing  sites-          Administrative reports Environmental laws respected
2. Fish ponds increased At least 4 functional fish ponds exist in the municipality by 2015 –          Visit to fish ponds-          Administrative reports Stable economic environment
Activities Quantity Place

Cost (cfa)

R1 Fish harvesting methods reduced      
1.1 Organize training on improved fish harvesting methods 4 Toko, Dienge, Banyo, Lipenja 5,000,000
1.2 Distribute fishing equipment to fishermen / women 100 persons Toko, Dienge, Banyo, Lipenja 20,000,000
R2. Fish ponds increased      
2.1 Train farmers on fish production 4 training Toko 4,000,000
2.2 Assist farmers in the construction of fish ponds 4 ponds Toko, Dienge, Banyo, Lipenja 40,000,000
2.3  Supply fingerlings to fish farmers 4 farmers   2,000,000
Total     51.000.000
               

PROBLEM ANALYSIS:     STATE PROPERTY AND LAND TENURE

 

Illegal possession of land

High rate of conflicts between individuals and neighboring villages

High insecurity of state property and land

Poor management of state property and land

 

Absence of title deeds for state property and land occupied

Poor community sensitization on the importance of land titles and how to obtain them

No management strategy put in place

 

LOGICAL FRAMEWORK:  STATE PROPERTY AND LAND TENURE

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Global objective Security of State and Private properties improved. By 2015 at least 40% of state property and land  secured –          Visits-          Administrative reports –          Favorable land tenure policy.-          Enabling political and economic climate
Specific objective Legal possession of land increased. By 2015 at least 30% of Government property are in good state with reduced  illegal possession –          Visits-          Land certificates-          Administrative reports- –          Favorable land tenure policy.-          Favorable political and economic climate
Results 1. Title deeds for state and private land increased. At least 20% of land have land certificates and are developed by 2015 Land certificates Conflict management ensured
2. Management of state property and land occupied improved By 2015, a management plan is developed and implemented by all stakeholders. Management plan Collaboration of all stakeholders
Activities Quantity Place

Cost (cfa)

R1.  Title deeds for state and private land increased.      
1.1 Sensitize population on land ownership procedures 2 meetings Toko and Madie Ngolo 300,000
1.2  Issue land certificates As requested Toko and Madie Ngolo 100,000
R2 Management of state property and land occupied improved      
2.1  Developed a management plan 2 workshops Toko and Madie Ngolo 1,000,000
2.2  Monitor implementation of plan 8 times Toko and Madie Ngolo 4,000,000
Total     5.300.000
               

Unattractive towns

Poor hygiene and sanitation

Few visitors

Poor town planning and housing

No master plan for Toko and Madie Ngolo towns

Poor collaboration with town planning officials

Poorly constructed houses (use of temporal and local materials)

Haphazard building of houses

None issuing of building permits

No strategy put in place to promote permanent houses (cement blocks)

PROBLEM ANALYSIS: HOUSING & URBAN DEVELOPMENT
LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: HOUSING & URBAN DEVELOPMENT

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Master plan for the municipality developed At least 3 major towns in the municipality have master plans by 2015 –          Town visit

–          Administrative reportsCollaboration between council and urban development and housingSpecific objective Town planning improvedBy 2015, the towns of Toko, Madie 1 and Lipenja are well presented with streets-          Town visit

–          Administrative reportsCollaboration between council and urban development and housingResults 1. Master plans of the municipality made availableMaster plans of Toko, Madie 1 and Lipenja put in place and used by 2013-          Master plan

–          Administrative reportsCollaboration between council and urban development and housing2.  Construction of houses using permanent materials increasedAt least 30% of the houses in the municipality are permanent structures by 2015-          Permits

–          Council reportsCollaboration between council and urban development and housing3.  Haphazard building of houses reducedAt least 40% of the population construct their houses with building permits by 2015-          Town visits

–          Council reportsFavorable economic conditionsActivitiesQuantityPlace

Cost (cfa)

R1 Master plans for Toko and Madie Ngolo towns made available   1.1  Design master plans3Toko, Lipenja and Madie Ngolo2 000,0001.2 Monitor the implementation of master plan6 timesToko, Lipenja and Madie Ngolo4,000,000R2 Haphazard building of houses reduced   2.1 Sensitize  population2 meetingsToko, Lipenja and Madie Ngolo400,0002.2 Issue building permitsAs requestedToko, Lipenja and Madie Ngolo100,0002.3  Monitor the building of houses6 timesToko, Lipenja and Madie Ngolo4,000,000R3. Constructed of houses improved (use of permanent materials)   3.1  Sensitize population on use of permanent materials2 meetingsToko, Lipenja and Madie Ngolo400,000Total  10.900.000 

 

 

 

 

Poor hygiene and sanitation

Increased rate of pollution

Increased rate of erosion

High rate of environmental degradation 

Poor management of natural resources

High rate of water pollution

Poor drainage system

Poor waste management

No waste management strategies put in place

High rate of illegal exploitation of timber

PROBLEM ANALYSIS: ENVIRONMENT AND NATURE PROTECTION  
LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: ENVIRONMENT AND NATURE PROTECTION

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Rate of pollution reduced Water and air pollution reduce in the municipality by at least 20% by 2015 –          Site visits-          Administrative reports Environmental laws respected
Specific objective Environmental degradation reduced Environmental degradation due to human practices reduce by at least 20% by 2015 –          Site visits-          Testimonies

–          Administrative reports-          Environmental laws respected-          Community collaborationResults1. Management of natural resources improvedAt least 20% of natural resources are sustainably managed by 2015-          Visits to forests, water sources and famers-          Administrative reports-          Environmental laws respected-          Community collaboration2.  Waste management improvedBy 2014 a functional waster management system is put in place-          Town visits-          Council reportsCommunity collaboration3.  Drainage system improvedBy 2014, drainage systems are constructed, functional and regularly maintained-          Site visits-          Council reports-          Favorable economic conditions-          Community collaborationActivitiesQuantityPlaceCost (cfa)R1. Management of natural resource improved   1.1 Sensitize the population49 meetingsAll villages4,900,000R2  Waste management improved   2.1  Sensitize population on domestic waste and sewage disposal4 townsToko, Lipenja, Dikome and Madie Ngolo200,0002.2  Install garbage cans in strategic places40Toko, Lipenja, Dikome and Madie Ngolo2,000,0002.3 Dispose content of garbage cans regularly40 (weekly)Toko, Lipenja, Dikome and Madie Ngolo10,000,0002.4  Create a garbage disposal site2Toko and Madie Ngolo2,000,000R3  Drainage system improved   3.1  Construct culverts and gutters2 townsToko and Madie Ngolo10,000,0003.2 Maintain culvers and gutters2 townsToko and Madie Ngolo5,000,000Total  34.100.000

 

 

Limited income NTFP
Extinction of forest values
Degradation of the forest
Unsustainable exploitation of forest resources

Illegal exploitation of timber Limited implementation of the law   Limited forestation   Decline in non timber forest products   No forestation strategy put in place   Limited sources of protein Illegal hunting   Non domestication of NTFPs Unsustainable harvesting of NTFPs Limited sources of alternative income PROBLEM ANALYSIS: FORESTRY AND WILDLIFE LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: FORESTRY AND WILDLIFE Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions Level Formulation Overall objective Extinction of forest resources reduced By 2015, destruction of biodiversity reduced by at least 20% –          Administrative report –          Visits to forest –          Forest laws respected –           Fire disasters reduce Specific objective Management of forest resources improved By 2015 at least 50% of the population practice sustainable forest management techniques –          Site visits –          Administrative report   –          Forest laws respected   Results 1. Illegal exploitation of timber reduced By 2015, Illegal exploitation of the forest reduced by at least 20% –          Administrative report –          Visits to forest –          Forest laws respected –          Conflict over land use reduced 2. Illegal hunting reduced By 2015, Illegal hunting reduced by at least 20% –          Administrative report –          Testimonies –          Forest laws respected   3. Non timber forest products sustainably managed By 2015 at least 10.000 NTFPs are domesticated and sustainably harvested –          Visits to forest and farms –          Testimonies Community collaboration 4.  Forestation increased.  By 2015 at least 5000 trees are planted in the municipality –          Visits to the forest –          Community collaboration Activities Quantity Place COST (CFA) R1 Illegal exploitation of timber reduced       1.1  Sensitize the population on forestry laws 49 All villages 4,900,000 1.2 Issue permits for forestry exploitation 5 Toko 1.000,000 R2.  Illegal hunting reduced       2.1  Sensitize the population on illegal hunting 49 meetings All villages 4,900,000 R3.  Non timber forest products sustainably managed (NTFPs)       3.1  Organized trainings on domestication and sustainable harvesting of NTFPs 49 All villages 4,900,000 3.2 Supply NTFPs seedlings for planting 10,000 seedlings All villages 10,000,000 R4. Forestation increased       4.1 Sensitize the population on forestation 49 All villages 4,900,000 4.2 Supply tree seedlings for planting 5000 seedlings All villages 5,000,000 Total     35.600.000       PROBLEM ANALYSIS:     TOURISM & LEISURE   Few tourists    Low revenue from the tourism sector    Poor development of tourist potentials  Absence of tourist infrastructures (hotel, restaurants, guest houses)  Poor community mobilization     Poor development of tourist sites     Poor economic power Poor attraction of tourists LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: TOURISM & LEISURE Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions Level Formulation Overall objective Revenue from the tourism sector  increased Annual revenue from the tourism sector increase by at least 20% –          Council accounts records –          Testimonies Favorable economic and political conditions Specific objective Development of tourist potentials increased By 2015 at least 100 tourists visit the municipality annually –          Council reports –          testimonies Favorable political conditions Results 1. Tourist infrastructures such as hotels and restaurants increased By 2014 at least 1 functional standard hotel and restaurant exist in the municipality –          site visit –          administrative  reports Enabling economic conditions 2.  Development of tourist sites increased At least 3 tourist sites are developed and attract tourists by 2014 –          site visits –          council report Enabling economic conditions 3.  Community mobilization improved By 2014, at least 10  tourist guides  trained and functional –          testimonies –          council reports Community solidarity ensured Activities Quantity Place Cost (cfa) R1. Touristic infrastructures such as hotels and restaurants increased       1.1 Construct hotel and restaurant 1 Toko 50,000,000 R2. Development of tourist sites increased       2.1  Develop tourist sties 3   12,000,000 R3. Community mobilization improved       3,1 Train local tourist guides 10 youths Toko 1,000,000 Total     63.000.000       PROBLEM ANALYSIS:     ARTS & CULTURE   Loss of cultural values    Rural exodus     High deterioration rate of cultural values   Poor development and promotion of cultural activities   Poor community mobilization      Few cultural infrastructure (community halls) museums     Uncultured youthful population Limited cultural contribution in the economic growth  LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: ARTS & CULTURE Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions Level Formulation Overall objective Cultural values enhanced By 2015, Cultural awareness within the municipality increase by at least 50% –          reports Stable economic and political climate Specific objective Deterioration of cultural values reduced Cultural values in the  municipality are practiced by at least 50% of the population by 2015 –          testimonies –          reports Community solidarity ensured Results 1. Development and promotion of cultural activities increased By 2015, at least 50% of cultural activities are revived and practiced in the municipality –          testimonies –          administrative reports Stable political climate 2.  Cultural infrastructures established By 2015 at least 2 functional community halls and museums exist and are used –          site visits –          council reports Stable economic environment 3. Community mobilization improved At least 60% of the population take part in cultural activities yearly –          reports –          testimonies Community solidarity ensured Activities Quantity Place Cost (cfa) R1. Development and promotion of cultural activities increased       1.1 Develop a strategy to revive cultural activities 1 meeting Toko 500,000 1.2 Organize cultural activities 10 cultural activities Toko, Madie Ngolo and Lipenja 50,000,000 R2.  Cultural infrastructures such as community halls and museums increased       2.1 Construct community halls and museums 3 Toko, Madie Ngolo and Lipenja 100,000,000 R3.  Community mobilization improved       3.1  Sensitize the population on the organization of cultural activities 49 meetings All villages 4,900,000 Total     155.400.000   PROBLEM ANALYSIS: INDUSTRY, MINES AND TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT   Limited benefits by the population and the council from the mining sector    High rate of poverty in the communities     Poor development of the industrial and mining sector  Non availability of database on research carried out on mines  Poor community mobilization      Limited Knowledge on mining potentials      Non financing of micro –projects by companies LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: INDUSTRY MINES AND TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions Level Formulation Overall objective Industrial base of the municipality increased Council industrial policy put in place  by 2013 –          Visits –          Administrative reports –            Favorable policy framework Specific objective Development of the mining and industrial  sector improved At least one feasibility studies conducted by 2014 –          Administrative reports –          Testimonies Favorable policy framework Results 1. Mining activities in the municipality promoted  At least 1 processing industry functional by 2015 –          Prospection reports –          data Favorable policy framework 2. An industrial zone put in place By 2015 at leas one industrial zone exists –          Site visits –          Reports Favorable political climate Activities Quantity Place Cost (cfa) R1. Data base on research carried out made available       1.1 Contact mining companies 1 trip Yaounde and Douala 250,000 R2.  Mining industries put in place       2.1 Lobby for mining industry 1 trip Yaoune and Douala 250,000 R3. Community mobilization improved       3.1  Sensitize communities 49 meetings All villages 2,500,000 Total     3.000.000       PROBLEM ANALYSIS: COMMUNICATION   Poor circulation of information     Poor exposure to the outside world      Poor access to information    Poor access to radio, TV and internet signals  Limited availability of newspaper       Absence of community radio       Population is less informed  LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: COMMUNICATION Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions Level Formulation Overall objective Circulation of information improved By 2015, at least 50% of the population are informed on major events –          Testimonies –          Reports Favorable policy framework Specific objective Access to information increased .By 2015 at least 50% of the population can regularly send and receive information –          Testimonies –          Reports Favorable policy framework Results 1. Access to radio, TV and internet signals improved By 2015, at 30% of the population receive CRTV and other signals –          Home visits –          Reports Favorable policy framework 2.  Community radio put in place By 2015, at least one functional community radio exist in the municipality –          Visit to radio –          Reports Favorable economic conditions 3. Circulation of news papers increased By 2014 at least one functional newspaper vendor exist in the municipality –          Available newspapers –          Reports Favorable economic conditions Activities Quantity Place Cost (cfa) R1 Access to radio, TV and internet signals improved       1.1 Lobby for the installation of CRTV transmission antennas 2 trips Buea, Yaounde 500,000 R2. Community radio put in place       2.1 Lobby for the creation of a community radio 2 trips Buea, Yaounde 500,000 2.2 Install community radio 1 Toko 25,000,000 R3. Circulation newspaper increased       3.1 Contact newspaper vendors 2 trips Kumba and Buea 300,000 Total     26.300.000 PROBLEM ANALYSIS: POST AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS   Poor communication with people within and out of the country      Limited access to postal services and telecommunications    Poor mobile telecommunication network   No fixed telephone network        Non functional post office       Population is less informed   LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: POST AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions Level Formulation Overall objective Communication with people within and out of the country improved By 2015 at least 50% of the population regularly send and receive information using telecommunication –          Testimonies –          reports Favorable policy framework Specific objective Access to postal services and telecommunication increased By 2015 at least 50% of the population are satisfied with postal and telecommunication services –          testimonies Favorable policy framework Results 1. Mobile telecommunication network increased By 2015 at least 2 functional mobile telephone networks exist in the municipality –          list of subscribers –          testimonies Stable economic environment 2.  Functional post office put in place By 2015 at least 1 functional post office exist in the municipality –          visit –          administrative reports –          testimonies Favorable policy framework Activities Quantity Place Cost (cfa) R1.  Mobile telecommunication network increased       1.1 Lobby for the extension of mobile telephone networks 2 trips Buea. Yaounde 1,000,000 R2. Functional post office put in place       2.1 Lobby for the creation of a post office 2 trips Buea, Yaounde 500,000 2.2  Construct post office 1 Toko 18,000,000 2.3  Lobby for the transfer of staff 2 trips Buea, Yaounde 500,000 Total     20.000.000   PROBLEM ANALYSIS: LABOUR AND SOCIAL SECURITY   High rate of unemployment      High rate of rural exodus      High rate of job insecurity     Insufficient number of established enterprises and organizations  Limited self-employment opportunities          Social instability   LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: LABOUR AND SOCIAL SECURITY Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions Level Formulation Overall objective Job security increased At least 50% of the working population have job security by 2015 –          Testimonies –          Administrative reports Favorable economic climate Specific objective Employee Social security payments improved By 2015, 50% employers regularly contribute social security for  their workers –          Testimonies –          Administrative reports Favorable economic climate Results 1. Stable Institutions increased  By 2014 at least 5 stable and profitable institutions established within the municipality   –          Visit –           council reports Favorable economic climate Activities Quantity Place Cost (cfa) R1.  Established enterprises and organizations increased       1.1 Support the establishment of enterprises 5 Toko and Madie Ngolo 11,000,000 1.2 sensitize workers on social security policies such as pensions, allowances, industrial risks etc. 2 meetings Toko and Madie Ngolo 5,400.000 Total     16.400.000     PROBLEM ANALYSIS: PUBLIC SECURITY Increased crime wave      Reduced population       High rate of insecurity      Insufficient security officers   Poor lighting of the municipality   Rural exodus    No permanent structures for gendarmes, police and customary court     LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: PUBLIC SECURITY Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions Level Formulation Overall objective Crime ware reduced By 2015, at least 40% of the population in the municipality circulate freely and live in peace –          Testimonies –          Administrative reports Enabling economic and political climate Specific objective Insecurity reduced By 2015 the number of criminal cases reduce by at least 30% yearly –          Testimonies –          Security reports Enabling economic and political climate Results 1. Security officers increased By 2015 at least 10 new elements of the  forces of law and order are transferred and functional –          Transfer decision –          Administrative reports Favorable policy framework  2. Permanent structures for forces of law and order and customary court put in place By 2015 gendarmerie brigade, police post and customary court structures are constructed and functional –          Visit  –          Administrative reports Favorable policy framework  3.  Lighting of the municipality increased By 2015, the streets of Toko and Madie Ngolo are regularly lighted. –          Visit –          Council reports Favorable policy framework  Activities Quantity Place Cost (cfa) R1  Security officers increased       1.1 Lobby for the transfer of security officers 10 security officers 2 trips Buea and Yaounde 500,000 R2.  Permanent structures for Gendarmes, police and customary court put in place       2.1  Construct Gendarme brigade, police post and customary court 3 structures Toko 100,000,000 R3.  Lighting of the municipality increased       3.1  Install street lights 2 towns Toko and Madie Ngolo 20,000,000 Total     120.500.000 PROBLEM ANALYSIS: TERRITORIAL ADMINISTRATION AND DECENTRALIZATION   Poor realization of community projects       Suspicious community members        Reduced Trust between communities and the Local Administration       Poor collaboration between communities and local administration.   Poor community awareness, commitment and mobilization   Poor development of the community     LOGICAL FRAMEWORK:  TERRITORIAL ADMINISTRATION AND DECENTRALIZATION Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions Level Formulation Overall objective Peaceful coexistence and mutual respect within the municipality By 2015 at least 70% of communities express willingness to collaborate with local administrators –          Visits –          Administrative reports Favorable economic and political condition Specific objective Trust in local administration increased By 2014 at least 50% of the population respect their chiefs, community laws and the local administration –          Testimonies –          Reports  Enabling political climate Results 1. Collaboration improved and classification of Chiefs improved By 2014 at least 60% of Chiefs are recognized and serve as auxiliaries of the administration. –          Testimonies –          Administrative Reports  Enabling political climate 2. Community awareness, commitment & mobilization improved By 2014, at least 60% of the population regularly participates in meetings initiated by the administration. –          Testimonies –          Reports  Collaboration community members ensured Activities Quantity Place Cost (cfa) R1. Leadership improved       1.1 Train & classify traditional rulers on leadership and management 1 training for 49 Chiefs and 20 Chiefs reclassified Toko 5,000,000 R2.  Community mobilization improved       2.1 Sensitize communities on self-help development 49 meetings All villages 4,900,000 Total     9.900.000   PROBLEM ANALYSIS: SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH AND INNOVATION   Reduced production and productivity        Limited access to improved technology        Poor dissemination of research findings     Non participatory technology development   Poor economic benefits     LOGICAL FRAMEWORK:  SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH AND INNOVATION Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions Level Formulation Overall objective Access to Scientific benefits increased within the municipality By 2015 at least 70% of the population have  access to scientific innovations  –          Testimonies –          Administrative reports Favorable economic climate Specific objective Technological innovations increased By 2015,  improved scientific technologies in agriculture and livestock available within the municipality –          Visits –          Administrative Reports  Appropriateness of technology ensured  Results 1. Dissemination of scientific innovations (inputs) improved By 2015 scientific inputs in agriculture and livestock made available in 49 villages –          Testimonies –          Field visits –          Reports   Timeliness and appropriateness of research findings 2. Research outreach programs increased By 2013, research outreach programs  exist in the municipality –          Testimonies –          Research Reports  Collaboration of stakeholders ensured Activities Quantity Place Cost (cfa) R1. Dissemination of research findings improved       1.1  Develop research dissemination strategy 1 Research centre Barombi Kang and Ekona 100,000 1.2 Implement research dissemination strategy 1 All villages 5,000,000 R2. Participatory technology development increased       2.1 Sensitize communities 49 meetings All villages 4,900,000 2.2  Conduct research with stakeholders 20 on farm trials 20 villages (to be determined by researchers) 10,000,000 Total     20.000.000   PROBLEM ANALYSIS: SOCIAL AFFAIRS Insufficient awareness on the availability of social benefits for vulnerable persons. No assistance to vulnerable population Non existence of social workers Absence of social center Insufficient social services Increase in psychological trauma     LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: SOCIAL AFFAIRS Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions Level Formulation Overall objective Assistance to vulnerable population increased By 2015, at least 70% of vulnerable persons are empowered and satisfied with the services rendered    –          reports –          testimonies Enabling political and economic conditions Specific objective Social services improved By 2015 at least 70% of vulnerable persons have access to quality social services -Reports -Testimonies Enabling economic conditions Results     1.Social Centers increased At least 2 functional social centers exist by 2014 -Site visits -Reports Enabling economic conditions 2.Social workers increased By 2014, at least 4 functional trained social workers exist -Transfer decision -Administrative report Favorable policy framework 3.Awareness on available social benefits for vulnerable persons increased At least 80% of vulnerable persons know their social benefits and at least 70% get them regularly -Administrative reports -Testimonies Enabling economic conditions Activities Quantity Place Costs (CFA) R1. Social centers increased       1.1. Construct social centers 2 Toko and Madie Ngolo 100,000,000 R2. Social workers increased       2.1. Lobby for the transfer of social workers 2trips , 2staff Buea and Yaounde 500,000 R3 Awareness on available social benefits for vulnerable persons increased.       3.1. Sensitize vulnerable persons on social benefits and how they can have access to them. 2 meetings Toko and Madie Ngolo 200,000 Total     100.700.000   PROBLEM ANALYSIS: YOUTH & CITIZEN EDUCATION   Poverty among youths High illiteracy rate High rate of rural exodus High prevalence of HIV/AIDS High rate of unemployment Juvenile delinquency Insufficient empowerment of the youth. Insufficient trainers and youth animators Absence of youth empowerment structures Poor mobilization of youth.         Prostitution Early marriages of the girl child                           LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: YOUTH & CITIZEN EDUCATION Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions Level Formulation Overall objective Awareness on youthful living and civic  responsibilities increased At least 70% of youths are living responsible lives by 2014 -Visit -Reports Favorable economic conditions Specific objective Youth empowerment facilities and programs increased By 2014, realistic youth programs are drawn up and implemented yearly in conducive environments -Visit -reports Favorable education policy Results   Trainers and youth animators increased By 2014 at least 2 functional youths animators are in place and functional -visit -Report Favorable economic conditions   Youth empowerment structures and services increased By 2015 at least 1 youth animation centre is constructed and functional -Transfer decision -Administrative report Favorable policy framework.   Mobilization of youths on income generating activities increased At least 10% of youths operate gainful businesses by 2014 -Reports Enabling political conditions. Activities Quantity Place Cost (CFA) R1. Youth empowerment structures increased       1.1. Construct youth and animation centers 2 Toko and Madie Ngolo 100,000.000 R2. Trainers and youth animators increased       2.1. Lobby for the transfers of trainers and youth animators 2 animators 2 trips Buea and Yaounde 500,000 R3. Mobilization of youths improved       3.1. sensitize youths 49 meetings All villages 4,900,000 Total     105.400.000   Insufficient sports activities. Low rate of physical exercise  Insufficient sport teachers Insufficient sports equipment in schools Insufficient sporting activities Insufficient sport competitions Poor development of sports and leisure discipline No sports complex PROBLEM ANALYSIS: SPORTS AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION           LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: SPORTS AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions Level Formulation Overall objective Physical education exercises increased. By 2015, at least 50% of the population carry out physical exercises -Testimonies -Visits Change of attitude in sporting activities  Specific objective Sporting activities increased  Diversified sporting activities increased by at least 20%  and promoted regularly  -Reports -Observations  Enabling economic conditions Results                   1.Sports equipment in schools increased  By 2015 each school is equipped with at least 3 sports equipment -School records -Visits  Enabling economic conditions  2.Sports teachers increased  At least 5 functional trained teachers in place by 2013 -Transfer decision -Reports Favorable policy framework. 3.Sports complex increased  At least 2 sports complex exist and used. -Visits -Reports Enabling economic conditions. 4.Local sports activities increased At least 2 sports competitions organized yearly -Council reports -Testimonies Enabling economic conditions Activities Quantity Place Cost (CFA) R1. Sports equipment in primary schools increased       1.1. supply schools with sports equipment 24 All villages with G. S and G.S.S and Technical Schools 20.000,000 R2. Sports teachers increased        2.1. Lobby for 5sports teachers 1 trip Buea and Yaounde 300,000 R3. Sports platform increased       3.1. Construct sport complex 2 Toko    35,000,000 R.4. Local sports activities increased       4.1 Organize football competitions 2 Toko and Madie Ngolo 2,000,000 Total     57.300.000 PROBLEM ANALYSIS: EMPLOYMENT AND VOCATIONAL TRAINING High crime wave High rate of illegal activities (smuggling) Low exploitation of human potentials Juvenile delinquency High unemployment rate Insufficient skills for professional self employment Insufficient employment opportunities Limited social economic operators for apprenticeship                 Limited capital for individual ventures Little self employment Limited Access to credit facilities Few enterprises               LOGICAL FRAMEWORK:  EMPLOYMENT AND VOCATIONAL TRAINING Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions   Level Formulation   Overall objective Skills development increased. By 2015, marketable skills transferred to at least 40% of persons within the employable age  -Testimonies -Trainees evaluation reports  Enabling economic conditions     Specific objective Employment increased  By 2015, at least 40% of individuals with professional skills are gainfully employed  -Employment contracts -Testimonies  Enabling economic conditions   Results                                         1.Training opportunities increased   By 2014,at least 500 individuals trained on small business start ups -Reports -Testimonies   Favorable policy framework    2.Self employment increased By 2015, at least 50% of those trained are self employed – Visit to business places – Tax receipts Enabling business climate   Activities Quantity Place Cost (CFA) R1. Employment opportunities increased         1.1. Lobby for the establishment of business enterprises 10 businesses 2 trips Kumba and Douala 300,000   R2. Self employment increased          2.1. Link youths to various social economic operators such as hair dressers, mechanics, carpenters etc. 1 trip Mundemba and Toko 500,000   2.2. Support unemployed trained and supported with seed capital (PIAISI) 500 persons Toko, Madie, Lipenja, Dikome 210.000.000   Total     210.800.000                                   PROBLEM ANALYSIS: TRANSPORT Poor circulation  Low economic activities Frequent accidents  High cost of transport fares Limited means of transportation. Poor state of vehicles Few transport vehicles  Irregular maintenance of vehicles Over loading of vehicles and motorbikes No transport agencies                                                                                                                                                                                            LOGICAL FRAMEWORK:  TRANSPORT Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions Level Formulation Overall objective Circulation of goods and persons improved  At least 50% of the population move safely and on time within and outside the municipality by 2015 -Observations -Council records -Testimonies Favorable economic and political conditions   Specific objective Means of transportation improved   By 2015, at least 50% of the population travel in good vehicles with affordable fares -Testimonies -Council records  Cooperation of transporters ensured  Results               1.Transport vehicles increased   By 2015, transport vehicles and motorbikes increase by at least 40% -Council records -Observations   Enabling economic conditions  2.State of vehicles improved   At least 70% of vehicles and motorbikes are regularly maintained -Visit to garages -Testimonies -Records of broken down vehicles Enabling economic conditions. 3.Overloading of vehicles and motorbikes reduced   At least 40% of passengers travel comfortably in vehicles and on motorbikes regularly. -Testimonies -Transport records Cooperative transporters union  Activities Quantity Place Cost (CFA) R1. Transport vehicles increased        1.1. Organize meetings with transporters  2 meetings Toko and Madie Ngolo 20.000,000 R2. State of vehicles improved        2.1. Sensitize transporters on the importance of vehicle maintenance  2 meetings  Toko and Madie Ngolo 20.000,000 R3. Overloading of vehicles and motorbikes reduced       3.1. Sensitize passengers and transporters 2 meetings Toko and Madie Ngolo  20.000,000 3.2. Sanction defaulters – – – Total     60.000.000 Under development  Insufficient number of elites with gainful   professions Limited access to higher education Absence of  professional schools   Poor orientation toward higher education   Poor lobbying  PROBLEM ANALYSIS: HIGHER EDUCATION                                   LOGICAL FRAMEWORK:  HIGHER EDUCATION Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions Level Formulation Overall objective Number of professional institutions  increased At least 1 professional institution exist in the municipality by 2014 -Testimonies -Reports Enabling economic conditions   Specific objective Access to quality higher education increased At least 25% of youths obtain Diplomas and degrees by 2015 -Enrollment register -Testimonies  Favorable economic and political environment   Results     1. Access to professional schools increased At least 25% of youths are admitted into professional schools by 2015 -Visit -Decision creating the school    Favorable political environment 2. Higher professional schools in the division increased At least 1 professional school created  by 2014 -Testimonies   Enabling economic conditions. Activities Quantity Place Cost (CFA) R1. higher  professional schools increased       1.1. Lobby for the creation of higher professional school  2 trips Buea and Yaounde 1.500,000 R2. Orientation on higher education enhanced        2.1. organize orientation meetings in schools   3  G.S.S Madie Ngolo G.S.S Toko G.T.C Lipenja   3.000,000 Total     4.500.000   PROBLEM ANALYSIS: SMALL AND MEDIUM SIZE ENTERPRISES AND HANDICRAFT High rate of unregistered activities  Weak tax base of the council  High rate of unemployment  Few Actors in the Informal Sector High rate of exploitation of mangroves for fish smoking Limited access to the services provided within this sector  Low business knowledge and skills of the population  Few business operators within the municipality   LOGICAL FRAMEWORK: SMALL AND MEDIUM SIZE ENTERPRISES AND HANDICRAFT Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions Level Formulation Overall objective Actors in the Informal Sector within the municipality increased By 2015  informal sector actors increase by at least 35% yearly –          council revenue reports –          testimonies –          security ensured –          enabling economic environment Specific objective Small and medium size  enterprises increased By 2015 at least 40 small and medium size enterprises are operational in the municipality –          Visit –          Council reports enabling economic environment Results 1. Capacity and skills of the population for informal sector activities increased At least 400 persons  acquire knowledge and skills and operate small enterprise (restoration, woodwork, hair dressers, mechanics, tailoring) –          Visit to business places –          Council reports –          enabling economic environment –          enthusiasm of the population 2.  Access to the services of small and medium size enterprises increased At least 70% of the population attend various training organized by this sector by 2013 Training reports –          enabling economic environment –          wiliness of the population ensured Activities Quantity Place Cost (cfa) R1.  Capacity and skills of the population increased        1.1 Organize sensitization meetings for people to attend training / apprentices 49 meetings All villages 1,000,000 1.2  Support  the establishment of small and medium size enterprises 400 persons Madie I, Lipenja, Toko   13, 700,000 R2  Access to the services of small and medium size enterprises increased       2.1 Lobby for the transfer of at least 2 qualified staff 2 trips Buea and Yaounde 300,000 2.2 Train on various trades and crafts 3 trainings All village 5, 000,000 Total     20.000.000   PROBLEM ANALYSIS: – TOKO COUNCIL Poor development of the municipality Unrealistic project Unsustainable exploitation of natural resources Poor standard of living of the population     Poor revenue collection Limited implementation of management procedures Insufficient sources of revenue   Insufficient involvement of stakeholders in the implementation of development projects  Poor staff evaluation Poor staff motivation Insufficient funds  Poor management of council assets   Poor collaboration with main stakeholders   Poor staff performance  Few qualified staff No approved council, 1 organigram No internal rules and regulations for staff  No clearly defined job descriptions Poor human resource management  Weak Functional capacity of the council V  LOGICAL FRAMEWORK:  TOKO COUNCIL Strategy Indicators Sources of verification Assumption Level Formulation Overall objective Development of the council sustainably improved   At least 40% of the population have access to basic facilities such as water, light, health, roads etc by 2015 –  Visits –  Observations –  Pictures – Administrative reports Enabling economic and political environment  Specific objective Functional capacity of Toko council strengthened    By 2015, at least 50% of earmarked projects are realized and benefit the population  –  Testimonies –  Administrative report –  Visits –  Pictures  – Collaboration of main stakeholders – Enabling economic conditions Results         1. Human resource management improved – By 2015, the council is equipped with sufficient qualified staff and regularly motivated. – By 2012 the council has an approved 2 organigram me in place and implemented  –  List of council staff – Organigram – Council reports  – Permanent residence of staff ensured  – Favorable policy framework 2.  Funds increased Council funds increased yearly by at least 5% and used following budget allocations –           Financial report –          Testimonies Favorable economic conditions 3. Management of council assets increased By 2015 at least 50% of council basic assets are acquired and used according to laid down procedures –          Visit –          Council report Favorable economic conditions Collaboration of all stakeholders ensured 4.  Collaboration with main stakeholders improved By 2013, at least 50% of the main stakeholders participate in the realization of development projects in the municipality -Testimonies Council reports   Conducive political climate Activities Quantity Place Cost (cfa) R1 Human resource management improved       1.1 Approve council organigram 1 Toko 200.000 1.2 Train staff and councilors 4 trainings according to assessed needs Toko, CEFAM, Buea 20.000.000 1.3 Organize staff meeting Monthly Toko 6.000.000 1.4 Define job descriptions and internal rules and regularities 1 Toko 200.000 1.5 Pay staff salaries Monthly Toko 24.000.000 1.6 Evaluate staff performance Once a year : 4 years Toko 400.000 R2 Funds increased       2.1 Identify potential sources of revenue 1 meeting Toko 200.000 2.2 Develop strategies for effective collection of revenue 1 meeting Toko 200.000 2.3 Write project proposals for external funding 5 projects Toko 1.000.000 2.4 Carry out annual auditing Once a year: 4 years Toko 4.000.000 2.5 Lobby for a municipal treasurer 2 trips Buea and Yaounde 300.000 R3 Management of council assets increased       3.1 Acquire office equipment 1 Lot Kumba 10.000.000 3.2 Paint the council chambers   Toko 3.000.000 3.3 Facilitate the functioning of Meangwe market 4 sensitization meetings All villages concerned 500.000 3.4 Develop standard operating procedures for the use of the council 4×4 pick vehicle and the tipper 1 meeting Toko 1.000.000 4. Collaboration with main stakeholders improved       4.1 Identify all council stakeholders 1 meeting Toko 200.000 4.2 Organize a forum with main stakeholders 1 Toko 1.000.000 4.3 Elaborate training opportunities for Toko municipality 1 meeting Toko 2.000.000 4.4 Involve stakeholders in planning, monitoring and evaluation of micro-projects 2 meetings yearly 8 Toko 4.000.000 Total     78.200.000         Table of Village Priority Projects (in key sectors) and Village Development Committees (VDC) in Toko Municipality. Below are the priority projects identified and ranked per village including the development committees that were either activated or constituted as at 30th November 2011. Three villages including Manya, Boromba and Lowe have less than five persons each who could not constitute a VDC. However, they have all the main needs including resettlement of the population that left several years ago. Their priorities have been grouped at the end of the table below. The Terms of Reference for the VDCs were clearly agreed upon to include: v  Work in close collaboration with the Council Development Agent to follow up projects v  Facilitate data collection and updating all development activities within the village v  Ensure a strict follow up of the local solutions calendar v  Assist the Chiefs and Traditional council to seek funds to implement the projects as well as maintain the high commitment and ownership level of the village. v  Negotiate with relevant resource persons in and out of the village for project implementation v  Implement the M&E plan: collect, analyze and document all monitoring and evaluation information. v  Remind respective village resource persons of the activities planned for them in each project v  Develop annual implementation plans v  Document the VDP implementation process and inform the villagers of the process and constraints and opportunities   No Village Micro Projects in Priority Village Development  Committee Members Sector Micro Project Name Position Occupation 1 Toko  Public Works Rehabilitate road network Maliba Elvis President Councilor Energy  Rehabilitate and extend thermal electricity plant Ogen Philip Secretary Farmer Water Rehabilitate and extend water scheme Esona Rosaline Financial Sec. House wife Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Mulango Jacobine Treasurer House wife Public Health Equip the health centre with essential drugs and equipment Maliba Edward Adviser 01 Farmer Commerce Equip market with lock up stores Mathias Penda Adviser 02 Farmer Arts & Culture Construction of a community hall for cultural manifestation Iquoh Sophie Adviser 03 House wife Basic Education Equipment and furniture in GS (pupil desks, table’s chairs for teachers)       Secondary Education Construction of four classrooms to GSS and supply of didactic materials       Forestry Plant trees and sensitize on aforestation       Livestock Provide high breed species to farmers         2 Madie 1 Public Works Rehabilitate road network Nesoah Martin President Farmer Energy  Rehabilitate and extend thermal electricity plant NgandaValantine Secretary Mayor Water Rehabilitate and extend water scheme MolikiThimoty Financial Secretary Farmer Public Health Supply of basic health equipment and drugs to health center Maurice Mekumba Treasurer Nurse Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Metoko Abel Adviser 01 Farmer Commerce Construct a modern permanent  market Elibe Jeremiah Adviser 02 Farmer Basic Education Equipment and furniture (pupil desks, table’s chairs for teachers)       Secondary Education Construction of four classrooms to GSS and supply of didactic materials       Culture Construct a community hall for cultural manifestations       Forestry Plant trees and sensitize on aforestation       Livestock Provide high breed species to farmers         3 Moboka Public Works Maintenance of existing road network and rehabilitation of culverts and bridges Nakeli Namoa President Farmer Energy Install thermal electricity Eboa Simon Secretary Farmer Water Install water scheme Moni Victor Financial Secretary Farmer Public Health Construction of a  health centre and   public toilets Mokele Samuel Treasurer Businessman Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers EkoiUrga Adviser 01 Housewife Commerce Construction of a modern permanent  market Ngomo Martin Adviser 02 Farmer Basic Education Construction of  8 classrooms to four GSs  and supply didactic materials Itie Oscar Adviser 03 Farmer Secondary Education Construction of four classrooms to GSS and supply of didactic materials       Forestry Plant trees and sensitize on aforestation       Livestock Provide high breed species to farmers       4 Dikome Ngolo Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network and construction of culverts/bridges Moses Nakomo President Farmer Water and Energy Supply  of a potable water scheme EffiongBevser Secretary Farmer   Install thermal electricity (3) OsiakaAsah Financial Secretary farmer Public Health  Rehabilitate health centre Madam Esube Treasurer Farmer Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Bonge Adviser 01 Farmer Commerce Construct modern  market EbotaNotuah Adviser 02 Farmer Basic Education Construction of 6 addition classrooms in GS Dikome, Mapanja and Dibonda John Diso Adviser 03 farmer Livestock Provide high breed species to farmers       5 Ngamoki 1 Water Install water scheme Nitwa Andreas President Farmer Energy Install thermal electricity Motia Kingsly Secretary Hunter Public Health Construction health center and equip   with basic essential  drugs  Okalome Daniel Financial Secretary farmer Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Isah Henry Treasurer Farmer Commerce Construct  market Bebore Samuel Adviser 01 Farmer   Joan Misori Adviser 02 Farmer John Epimba Adviser 03 farmer 6 Tombe Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network Eboka Paul President Farmer Water Install water schemes and form  functional management committee Sakwe Stephan Secretary Farmer Energy Install thermal  electricity plants (4) EbokaEmerencia Financial Secretary farmer  Public Health Construction of health centre and equip   with basic essential  drugs  Esemu Dorothy Treasurer Farmer Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Chief Ebeka Lucas Adviser 01 Farmer Commerce Construct modern  market Dipenda Joseph Adviser 02 Farmer  Basic Education Construction of 4 additional classrooms Dipenda Mathias Adviser 03 farmer 7 Nwamoki Water Install water scheme Oponde Simon President Farmer Energy Install thermal electricity Orume Richard Secretary Farmer Public Health Construction health center and equip   with basic essential  drugs  Ngoe David Financial Secretary farmer Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Sophie Black Treasurer Farmer Commerce Construct  market Morundu Linus Adviser 01 Farmer   Ojoh Patrick Adviser 02 Farmer Elemitah Esther Adviser 03 Housewife 8 Mapanja (Ngamoki 2) Water Install water scheme Mokongo Johnson President Teacher Energy Install thermal electricity Ebongo Collet Secretary Teacher Public Health Construction health center and equip   with basic essential  drugs  Elangwe Emmanuel Financial Secretary farmer Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Ambalo Paul Treasurer Farmer Commerce Construct  market Akotry George Adviser 01 Farmer     Helen Ekpe Adviser 02 Housewife     Mosongo Jonas Ngembeni Adviser 03 farmer 9 Meangwe 1  Public Works Rehabilitate road network Patric Ngime President Teacher Energy  Rehabilitate and extend thermal electricity plant Itabina Moses Secretary Contractor Water Rehabilitate and extend water scheme Nganda Austin Vice president Farmer Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Charles Mekume Treasurer Court manager Public Health Equip the health centre with essential drugs and equipment Nanya Banabas Member Retired teacher Commerce Equip market with lock up stores Ngomo Sylvanus Member Farmer Arts & Culture Construction of a community hall for cultural manifestation Aja Lawrence Adviser 03 Retired teacher Basic Education Equipment and furniture in GS (pupil desks, table’s chairs for teachers)       Forestry Plant trees and sensitize on aforestation       Livestock Provide high breed species to farmers         10 Iboko Public Works Rahabilitate existing road network Moki Joseph President Teacher Energy Install thermal electricity Eta Felix Secretary Nurse Water Construct a water scheme with gravity Esona Pius Financial Secretary farmer  Public Health Construct and equiped  health centre BeleBalemba Treasurer Teacher Culture Construct community hall for cultural manifestations Linus Balemba Adviser 01 Farmer   Dio Manfred Adviser 02 Farmer EkpeniNazereth Adviser 03 Nurse 11 Itali Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network OrumePaulinus President Farmer Water Supply of  pipe borne  water scheme by gravity Agbor Johnson Secretary Farmer Energy Install thermal electricity Penda Agnes Financial Secretary farmer Public Health  Rehabilitate health centre NatekeliMicheal Treasurer Farmer Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Penda George Adviser 01 Farmer Commerce Construct modern  market Makongo Henry Adviser 02 Farmer Culture Construct community hall for cultural manifestations Agbor Oliver Adviser 03 farmer 12 Bareka 1 Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network Obase Austine Out President Teacher Water Install water schemes and form  functional management committee Mokoe Felix Mokoe Secretary Farmer Energy Install thermal  electricity plant Njoke Charles Kobo Financial Secretary farmer Public Health Construction of health center Njoke Angelina B. Treasurer Housewife Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Esaw Raymond Adviser 01 Pensioner Basic Education Construction of 6 classrooms and equip with  teachers desk and didactic materials Angi Felix Adviser 02 Farmer Culture Construct  community hall for cultural manifestation, Chief Obase Jonas D. Adviser 03 farmer 13 Dibonda Mosina Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network and construction of culverts/bridges Masango Amos President Farmer Water Supply  of a potable water scheme Meriki Vincent Secretary Farmer Energy Install thermal electricity Anaman Bertha Mandesi Financial Secretary Housewife Public Health  Rehabilitate health centre Malle George Treasurer Farmer Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Chief Anamani Anthony Adviser 01 Farmer Commerce Construct modern  market Nayaba John Adviser 02 Pensioner Basic Education Construction of 4 addition classrooms in GS Nayaba Joan Adviser 03 Housewife Livestock Provide high breed species to farmers       14 Masaka Batanga Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network Motabo George Bekima President Farmer Water Install water scheme and form  functional management committee Motiti John Secretary Farmer Energy Install thermal  electricity plant Ekole Venus Financial Secretary farmer  Public Health Construction of health centre and equip   with basic essential  drugs  BolembaBenedicta Treasurer Farmer Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Chief Besong David Adviser 01 Farmer Commerce Construct modern  market Motoko Jonas Adviser 02 Farmer   Besong Sophie Adviser 03 farmer 15 Bombangi Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network Oponde Roland President Farmer Water Supply of  pipe borne  water scheme by gravity Moloko Simon Secretary Farmer Energy Install thermal electricity Nasamai Clifford Financial Secretary farmer Public Health  Rehabilitate health centre Ewang Mary Treasurer Housewife Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Chief Ebune Francis Adviser 01 Farmer Commerce Construct modern  market Obie Pius Adviser 02 Farmer Culture Construct community hall for cultural manifestations Ekoi Susan Adviser 03 Housewife 16 Ipongi Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network Motia Mathias Balemba President Farmer Water Supply of  pipe borne  water scheme by gravity Epelenga Michael Secretary Farmer Energy Install thermal electricity Aloliase Lawrence Financial Secretary farmer Public Health  Rehabilitate health centre Ekine Elizabeth Treasurer Farmer Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Chief Epelenga Manfred Adviser 01 Farmer Commerce Construct modern  market Asangi Alex Balemba Adviser 02 Farmer Culture Construct community hall for cultural manifestations Ekine Rebecca Adviser 03 farmer 17 Babiabanga Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network Nandori Linus President Farmer Water Supply of  pipe borne  water scheme by gravity Mokala Adolf Secretary Farmer Energy Install thermal electricity Songo Emilia Financial Secretary Housewife Public Health  Rehabilitate health centre AshumAsha Mary Treasurer Housewife Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Mekanya Robert S. Adviser 01 Chief/farmer Commerce Construct modern  market Songo Philip AshumAshu Adviser 02 Chief council Culture Construct community hall for cultural manifestations Ngoe Rachael Adviser 03 farmer 18 Lobe Batanga Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network Martin Nemba President Teacher Water Install water scheme and form  functional management committee Iselle Isaac Secretary Farmer Energy Install thermal  electricity plant Nerius Mosuma Financial Secretary farmer  Public Health Construction of health centre and equip   with basic essential  drugs  Nemba Comfort Treasurer Housewife Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Nemba Sunday Lobe Adviser 01 Chief/farmer Commerce Construct modern  market Mokete Alex Adviser 02 Farmer  Basic Education Construction of 4 additional classrooms Iselle Susan Adviser 03 Housewife 19 Bareka 2 Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network Okon Jackson President Farmer Water Install water scheme and form  functional management committee Moluako Charles Secretary Farmer Energy Install thermal  electricity plant Komba Philip Financial Secretary farmer Public Health Construction of health center Mobele Elizabeth Treasurer housewife Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Ebebe Noah Oponde Adviser 01 Chief/farmer Basic Education Construction of 2 classrooms and equip with  teachers desk and didactic materials KombaZachaia Adviser 02 Chief/council Culture Construct  community hall for cultural manifestation, Lobe Martha Adviser 03 Housewife 20 Madie New Town Public Works Rehabilitate road network Edward Disonge Obie President Businessman Energy  Rehabilitate and extend thermal electricity plant Ndiba William Secretary Journalist Water Rehabilitate and extend water scheme EsemeMicheal Financial Secretary Teacher Public Health Supply of basic health equipment and drugs to health center Mbongi Angela Treasurer Businesswoman Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Dienge Adviser 01 Businessman Commerce Construct a modern permanent  market Obie Stephan Adviser 02 Civil  army Basic Education Equipment and furniture (pupil desks, table’s chairs for teachers) EpimbeMokala Adviser 03 farmer Secondary Education Construction of four classrooms to GSS and supply of didactic materials       Culture Construct a community hall for cultural manifestations       Forestry Plant trees and sensitize on aforestation       Livestock Provide high breed species to farmers         21 Madie Boembe Public Works Rehabilitate road network Moki Suffer Meboka President Farmer Energy  Rehabilitate and extend thermal electricity plant Moki Pascal Eboka Secretary Applicant Water Rehabilitate and extend water scheme Moki Abraham Financial Secretary farmer Public Health Supply of basic health equipment and drugs to health center Itoe Elizabeth Treasurer Housewife Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers MayouaJenet Adviser 01 Housewife Commerce Construct a modern permanent  market DikuruLoveline Adviser 02 Housewife Basic Education Equipment and furniture (pupil desks, table’s chairs for teachers)       Secondary Education Construction of four classrooms to GSS and supply of didactic materials       Culture Construct a community hall for cultural manifestations       Forestry Plant trees and sensitize on aforestation       Livestock Provide high breed species to farmers       22 Banyo Public Works Rehabilitate road network Molioh Benard President Farmer Energy Install thermal electricity plant Meyango Victor Secretary Farmer Water Install water scheme Diwala William Eyoh Financial Secretary Farmer  Public Health Construct and equip  health centre Moleba Mbenda Treasurer farmer Basic Education Rehabilitation of classrooms and supply of didactic materials Chief Ogen M. Adviser 01 Farmer Secondary Education Provide Technical College (GTC) Moleka Mathias Adviser 02 Farmer Employment & VocationalTraining Construct and equip SAR SM and make functional DiwolaElen Adviser 03 Farmer 23 Iwasa Public Works Rahabilitate existing road network Mukete Emmanuel President Teacher Energy Install thermal electricity Meboka Daniel Secretary Farmer Water Construct a water scheme with gravity HellenNakeli Financial Secretary farmer  Public Health Construct and equiped  health centre EbukuMargrat Treasurer Farmer Culture Construct community hall for cultural manifestations Ochoe Thomas Adviser 01 Farmer 24 Kile Kile Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network Chief Solomon Ndoka President Chief Water Supply of  pipe borne  water scheme by gravity Songo Julius Secretary Teacher Energy Install thermal electricity Cecilia Kosa Financial Secretary Housewife Public Health  Rehabilitate health centre Mboka Alice Treasurer Teacher Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Bisingi Edward Adviser 01 Farmer Commerce Construct modern  market Oponde Daniel Adviser 02 Farmer Culture Construct community hall for cultural manifestations Sakwe Johas Adviser 03 farmer Forestry Plant trees and sensitize on aforestation       Livestock Provide high breed species to farmers         25 Iyombo Public Works Rahabilitate existing road network Pius Nangia President Farmer Energy Install thermal electricity Felix Motia Secretary Farmer Water Construct a water scheme with gravity Alfred Dibo Financial Secretary farmer  Public Health Construct and equiped  health centre Linus Elangwe Treasurer Farmer Culture Construct community hall for cultural manifestations Jacob Neba Adviser 01 Farmer     Johnson Ngolo Adviser 02 Farmer 26 Dienge Public Works Rahabilitate existing road network Esobo Daniel President Farmer Energy Install thermal electricity Epie Felix Secretary Farmer Water Construct a water scheme with gravity Oponde Patricia Financial Secretary farmer  Public Health Construct and equiped  health centre Eboka Smith Treasurer Farmer Culture Construct community hall for cultural manifestations Bisingi Ben Adviser 01 Farmer   Ekabe Sophie Adviser 02 Farmer Esobo Sabina Adviser 03 farmer 27 Illondo Public Works Maintenance of existing road network and rehabilitation of culverts and bridges Ekale Riles President Farmer Energy Install thermal electricity Osake Cosmos Secretary Farmer Water Install water scheme Peter Ebone Financial Secretary farmer Public Health Construction of a  health centre and   public toilets Elizabeth Ebone Treasurer Farmer Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Anastasia Ikoe Adviser 01 Farmer Commerce Construction of a modern permanent  market Osaka Elizabeth Adviser 02 Farmer Basic Education Construction of  8 classrooms to four GSs  and supply didactic materials       Forestry Plant trees and sensitize on aforestation       Livestock Provide high breed species to farmers       28 Mobenge Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network Musango Michael President Farmer Water Supply of  pipe borne  water scheme by gravity Ekoli Mercy Secretary Farmer Energy Install thermal electricity Ebune Paul Financial Secretary Pastor (PCC) Public Health  Rehabilitate health centre Ekole Gilbert Treasurer Fascilitayors Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Nombo Margaret Adviser 01 Housewife Commerce Construct modern  market Ekota Comfort Adviser 02 Housewife Culture Construct community hall for cultural manifestations       Forestry Plant trees and sensitize on aforestation       Livestock Provide high breed species to farmers         29 Lipenja Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network Mbamene Javis President Electrician Energy Install thermal electricity plants Bamobe Cecilia I. Secretary Teacher Water Install water scheme Moleke Elvis E. Financial Secretary Graduate Public Health Rehabilitate  and equip  health centre EpakaJosophine Treasurer Housewife Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Chief Epaka Johnson Adviser 01 Farmer Basic Education Construction of additional 3 classrooms and supply with teacher desks       Culture Construct a community hall for cultural manifestations       Commerce Construct modern  market       30 Mofako Public Works Maintenance of existing road network and rehabilitation of culverts and bridges Tute Paus President Farmer Energy Install thermal electricity Ikose Felix Secretary Farmer Water Install water scheme Anamani Nelson Financial Secretary farmer Public Health Construction of a  health centre and   public toilets OsakeEnerst Treasurer Farmer Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Meriki Black Adviser 01 Farmer Commerce Construction of a modern permanent  market Massango Joseph Adviser 02 Farmer Basic Education Construction of  4 classrooms to four GSs  and supply didactic materials Osake Mathew Adviser 03 farmer Forestry Plant trees and sensitize on aforestation       Livestock Provide high breed species to farmers       31 Ikoi Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network John Anamity President Farming Water Install water scheme and form  functional management committee Mitongo David Secretary Businessman Energy Install thermal  electricity plant Belo Felix Financial Secretary Applicant Public Health Construction of health center Mukete Francis Treasurer Farming Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Ndingi Mathias Adviser 01 Farmer Basic Education Construction of 2 classrooms and equip with  teachers desk and didactic materials       Culture Construct  community hall for cultural manifestation,       32 Bokuba Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network Chief Echoe Thomas President Council Staff Water Install water scheme and form  functional management committee Mr. Divine Moto Secretary Farmer Energy Install thermal  electricity plant Mr. Godwin Itoe Financial Secretary Farmer Public Health Construction of health center Mrs. Cecil Ekoe Treasurer Farmer Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Mrs. Rose Besingi Adviser Farmer Basic Education Construction of 2 classrooms and equip with  teachers desk and didactic materials Mrs. Ebune Susan B. Member Farmer Culture Construct  community hall for cultural manifestation, Marie Osake Member Farmer 33 Bonabeanga  Public Work Rehabilitate road network Samson Ekpe President Farmer Energy  Rehabilitate and extend thermal electricity plant Jerine Besumbu Secretary Housewife Water Rehabilitate and extend water scheme Esomba Cecelia Financial Secretary Applicant Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Veronica Makumba Treasurer Housewife Public Health Equip the health centre with essential drugs and equipment Elemita Monica Adviser 01 Housewife Commerce Equip market with lock up stores Okpomiseh Chanel Adviser 02 Applicant Arts & Culture Construction of a community hall for cultural manifestation Sumbe Julie Adviser 03 Housewife Basic Education Equipment and furniture in GS (pupil desks, table’s chairs for teachers)       Forestry Plant trees and sensitize on aforestation       Livestock Provide high breed species to farmers         34 Bweme  Public Works Rehabilitate road network Makongo Joseph Monyangi President chief Energy  Rehabilitate and extend thermal electricity plant Mawba John Isele Secretary Farmer Water Rehabilitate and extend water scheme Mbutu Victor Financial Secretary Farmer Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Comfort moyengi Treasurer Farmer Public Health Equip the health centre with essential drugs and equipment Olivia Mbeli Adviser 01 Farmer Commerce Equip market with lock up stores Frida Sakwe Adviser 02 Farmer Arts & Culture Construction of a community hall for cultural manifestation Frida Isange Adviser 03 Farmer Basic Education Equipment and furniture in GS (pupil desks, table’s chairs for teachers)       Forestry Plant trees and sensitize on aforestation       Livestock Provide high breed species to farmers         35 Iyoe Public Works Maintenance of existing road network and rehabilitation of culverts and bridges Nalenya ZacNdo President Farming Energy Install thermal electricity Mekenya Linus Secretary Farmer Water Install water scheme Nche Manfred Oke Financial Sec farming Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Oke Abraham Adviser 01 Farmer Commerce Construction of a modern permanent  market Moli David Itabina Adviser 02 Farmer Basic Education Construction of  8 classrooms to four GSs  and supply didactic materials Youngweh Agnes Adviser 03 farmer Forestry Plant trees and sensitize on aforestation       Livestock Provide high breed species to farmers       36 Ndoi Public Works Maintenance of existing road network and rehabilitation of culverts and bridges  Chief Regent President Farming Energy Install thermal electricity Mr. Agbor Simon Secretary Farmer Water Install water scheme Ndoh Edward D. Financial Sec farming Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Mr. Awoh Zach. Adviser 01 Farmer Commerce Construction of a modern permanent  market Mr. Agbor Paul Adviser 02 farmer Basic Education Construction of  8 classrooms to four GSs  and supply didactic materials       Forestry Plant trees and sensitize on aforestation       Livestock Provide high breed species to farmers       37 Basari Public Works Maintenance of existing road network and rehabilitation of culverts and bridges Obase Augustine Otu President Farming Energy Install thermal electricity Nganda Samuel Secretary Farmer Water Install water scheme Epie Rosaline Financial Sec farming Public Health Construction of a  health centre and   public toilets Iselle Rudolf Treasurer Farmer Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Orume Patricia Adviser 01 Farmer Commerce Construction of a modern permanent  market Obase Mathew Adviser 02 Farmer Basic Education Construction of  8 classrooms to four GSs  and supply didactic materials       Forestry Plant trees and sensitize on aforestation       Livestock Provide high breed species to farmers       38 Esukotan Public Works Rehabilitate road network Awoh Zacharia President Farming Energy Install 3 thermal electricity plants Ndoh Edward Secretary Farmer Water Install 3 water schemes Nwese Samson Financial Sec farming  Public Health Construct and equip  health centre (2) Agbor Sanson Treasurer Farmer Basic Education Rehabilitation of classrooms and supply of didactic materials Effim Peter Adviser 01 Farmer Secondary Education Provide Technical College (GTC) Besinga Gladys Adviser 02 Farmer Employment & VocationalTraining Construct and equip SAR SM and make functional Moki Emilia Adviser 03 farmer 39 Ikenge Public Works, Water and Energy Rehabilitate road network Asito Samuel President Farming   Install 3 thermal electricity plants Oke Abraham Secretary Farmer   Install 3 water schemes Nemba Thomas Financial Sec farming  Public Health Construct and equip  health centre (2) Oben Elibe Treasurer Farmer Basic Education Rehabilitation of classrooms and supply of didactic materials David Mboka Adviser 01 Farmer Secondary Education Provide Technical College (GTC) Nalenya Zacheus Adviser 02 Farmer Employment & VocationalTraining Construct and equip SAR SM and make functional Elibe Sophina Adviser 03 farmer 40 Basari Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network Monyana Eric President Farming Water Install water schemesand form  functional management committee Epie Julie Maery Secretary Farmer Energy Install thermal  electricity plant Balemba Cletus Financial Sec farming Public Health Construction of health center Nbute Stephen Treasurer Farmer Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Mama Sophra Bi Adviser 01 Farmer Basic Education Construction of 6 classrooms and equip with  teachers desk and didactic materials Moki Roger Adviser 02 Farmer Culture Construct  community hall for cultural manifestation,       41 Ikoti 1 Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network Itoe Franklin President Farming Energy Install 3 thermal electricity plants Motanda Johnson Secretary Farmer Water Install water scheme Mr. Moki Samon Financial Sec farming Public Health Rehabilitate  and equip  health centre Ndingi Patrick Treasurer Farmer Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Kondo James Adviser 01 Farmer Basic Education Construction of additional 3 classrooms and supply with teacher desks       Culture Construct a community hall for cultural manifestations       Commerce Construct modern  market       42 Ikoti 2 Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network Cistus Oku President Farming Energy Install 3 thermal electricity plants Moki Anthony Secretary Farmer Water Install water scheme Songo Dennis Financial Sec farming Public Health Rehabilitate  and equip  health centre Okpa Dilonge Treasurer Farmer Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Kosah Samuel Adviser 01 Farmer Basic Education Construction of additional 3 classrooms and supply with teacher desks Balentine Sango Adviser 02 Farmer Culture Construct a community hall for cultural manifestations       Commerce Construct modern  market       43 Betika Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network Ngoe Fredrick President Farming Water Install water scheme and form  functional management committee Bosani Adolf Secretary Farmer Energy Install thermal  electricity plant Naikoh Sunday Financial Secretary farming Public Health Construction of health center Besaka Alice Treasurer Farmer Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Robert Nibo Adviser 01 Farmer Basic Education Construction of 6 classrooms and equip with  teachers desk and didactic materials       Culture Construct  community halls for cultural manifestation,       44 Esoki Public Works Maintenance of existing road network and rehabilitation of culverts and bridges Njoke Charles President Farming Energy Install thermal electricity Opaki Sophie Secretary Farmer Water Install water scheme Epie Christopher Financial Sec farming Public Health Construction of a  health centre and   public toilets Asaguo Angelina Treasurer Farmer Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Mekambe Irene Adviser 01 Farmer Commerce Construction of a modern permanent  market Ngoe Daniel Adviser 02 Farmer Basic Education Construction of  8 classrooms to four GSs  and supply didactic materials Oke Micheal Adviser 03 farmer Forestry Plant trees and sensitize on aforestation       Livestock Provide high breed species to farmers       45 Dobonda Kokori Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network and construction of culverts/bridges Esaw Stephen President Farming Water Supply  of a potable water scheme Djemo Pamela Secretary Farmer Energy Install thermal electricity Epingi Frida Financial Sec farming Public Health  Rehabilitate health centre Sanje Divine Treasurer Farmer Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Opaki Susan Adviser 01 Farmer Commerce Construct modern  market Mindako Abel Adviser 02 Farmer Basic Education Construction of 6 addition classrooms in GS Dikome, Mapanja and Dibonda Mokio Felix Adviser 03 farmer Livestock Provide high breed species to farmers       46 Mayeka Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network Chief Maloko Jonas President Farming     Water Install water scheme and form  functional management committee Paul Mbote Secretary Farmer     Energy Install thermal  electricity plant Ndoh Patrick Financial Secretary farming      Public Health Construction of health centre and equip   with basic essential  drugs  Masongo Stephen Treasurer Farmer     Agriculture Provide agricultural inputs and train farmers Ndoh Helen Adviser 01 Farmer     Commerce Construct modern  market Masongo Cornelius Adviser 02 Farmer      Basic Education Construction of 4 additional classrooms Nabangi Mesoro Adviser 03 farmer     .           Villages 47, 48, 49 (Manya, Boromba and Lowe)  have priority projects to resettle and rehabilitate their population which escaped to neighboring villages several years ago.. After resettlement, their needs will center around the key sectors including: Public Works, Energy, Water, Public Health, Agriculture, Commerce, Basic Education, Forestry and Livestock

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Participatory Diagnosis village by village and sector by sector within Toko Municipality were facilitated by resource persons of the Municipal Development Counselling (MUDEC) Group under the general supervision of the Team Leader. MUDEC Group,( the Local Support Organization)..

NAME QUALIFICATION CONTACT
CHARLIE MBONTEH.Team Leader.MUDEC Group, Buea. MBA MarketingRUTGERS University, USA (237) 77 64 94 30 / 94 34 43 52mudecgroup@yahoo.commudecgroup@gmail.comwww.mudecgroup.org

 

 


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