Municipal Development Counselling (MUDEC) Group .:: MUDEC GROUP ::.
  • Our Mission

    • Reducing poverty in our municipalities through encouraging gender equality and increasing citizen (End User) participation in democratic and governance processes.

MUDEC & WEEP collaboration

Table of Contents

 

Table of Contents…….. ……1

List of Abbreviations. 2

1.0 Executive Summary. 3

 

2.0 The WEEP …     ………….……………………………………………………………5

2.1 Background. 5

2.2  Goal……………………………………………………………………………………5

2.3  Objectives: 5

2,4 Planned Activities 2011 – 2012. ………..5

 

3.0  External Evaluation (purpose, objectives, methodology) …9

3.1 Purpose…………………………………………………………………………………9

3.2 Objectives………………………………………………………………………………9

3.3 Scope of the Evaluation ………………………………………………………………..9

3.4 Expected results and Deliverables………………………………………………………9

3.5 Methodology & Operational Guide……………………………………………………..9

3.6 Findings & Analysis Based on Evaluation Objectives………………………………..13

3.6.1 Assess the project realization and the impact it has on the project area…………….14

3.6.2 Assess the effectiveness and efficiency of the project management………………..17

3.6.2.1 WEEP Organizational Structure…………………………………………………..17

3.6.2.2 WEEP Staff……………………………………………………………………….18

3.6.2.3 WEEP Equipment…………………………………………………………………18

3.6.2.4 Analysis on the effectiveness of project management…………………………….18

3.6.2.5 Analysis on the efficiency of project management………………………………..18

3.6.3 Assess the sustainability of the project outcomes after the end of the project phase.20

3.6.4 Enable the project build on the results/recommendations of the evaluation and to

    consolidate the work that has been done in the previous project areas of Fako and Meme        divisions……………………………………………………………………………………..22

4.0 Challenges……………………………………………………………………………….24

5.0 Recommendations……………………………………………………………………….24

6.0 Conclusion……………………………………………………………………………….25

7.0 Annexes………………………………………………………………………………….26

7.1 Call for Tender……………………………………………………………………………26

7.2 Evaluation Team ………..……………………………………………………………….27

7.3 List of Persons Contacted………………………………………………………………..27

7.4 Photo Gallery…………………………………………………………………………….33

7.5 Samples of Data Collection Tools…………………………………………………………..35

 

 

 

 

LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS

 

AFFCO                       Association for Female Political Leaders

BftW                           Bread for the World

CEFAM                      Local Government Training Centre

CWF                           Christian Women Fellowship

ELECAM                   Elections Board in Cameroon

GCE                           General Certificate of Education

HIV/AIDS                  Human Immune Virus / Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome

MDG                           Millennium Development Goals

MINPROFF                Ministry of Women Affairs and the Family

MINAS                       Ministry of Social Affairs

MUDEC                     Municipal Development Counseling Group              

NGO                           Non-Governmental Organization

PCC                            Presbyterian Church in Cameroon.

SWOT                         Strengths Weaknesses Opportunities Threats

UNIFEM                    United Nations Fund for Women

WEEP                         Women’s Education and Empowerment Program

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1.0 Executive Summary

The Women Education Empowerment Program of the Presbyterian Church in Cameroon executed a series of activities in Meme Division of the South West Region with financing from Bread for the World in Stuttgart, Germany. The goal was to increase women participation in development and decision making processes in several target communities. A total of twelve wide ranging activities including sensitization meetings, trainings, focus discussions, radio programs and dissemination of printed materials that centered on Leadership, Political Participation and Women’s Rights (land ownership, inheritance, reproduction, polygamy, marriages, education of the girl child) were implemented in seventeen (17) communities between January 2011 and December 2012. About twelve thousand (12.000) persons were directly or indirectly reached (85% women) while men, youths, traditional and religious authorities constituted the other 15%.

The services of MUDEC Group (Service Provider) were retained by WEEP management to conduct an external evaluation at the end of the project phase. The evaluation objectives included:

  1. Assess the project realization and the impact it has on the project area
  2. Assess the effectiveness and efficiency of the project management
  3. Assess the sustainability of the project outcomes after the end of the project phase
  4. Enable the project build on the results/recommendations of the evaluation and to

    consolidate the work that has been done in the previous project areas of Fako and Meme        divisions.

MUDEC Group engaged five resource persons (3 females and 2 males) to conduct the evaluation. The methodology adopted for the exercise were centered on principles that ensured maximum participation of the target beneficiaries, allowed for triangulation of collected information, gender differentiation of respondents to questionnaires and representative sampling. The sample size included beneficiaries from twelve (12) communities representing 70% of total seventeen (17) communities reached during project execution.  300 questionnaires were utilized and twelve (12) focus groups were constituted and interviewed within twelve (12) communities.

The evaluation was guided by an operational technique including; knowledge of the organization (literature review); collection of information through questionnaires and focus group consultations; data analysis, interpretation and restitution; capitalization and presentation of reports (in hard and soft copies).

This evaluation report includes quantitative and qualitative analyses. The WEEP planned to organize twelve (12) key activities within seventeen (17) communities. These were successfully carried out representing 100% execution rate. Qualitatively, the evaluation observed that about 60% of beneficiaries (both men and women) still find it difficult to implement knowledge gained largely due to low economic abilities for the women and resistance to change long standing socio cultural habits on the part of the men.  95% of beneficiaries publicly expressed appreciation of the efforts of the WEEP and indicated their willingness to contribute toward the implementation of project ideals.  60% of the men including traditional authorities are culprits or perpetrators of these negative cultural values of polygamy, resistance to female inheritance of land, limited discussions on reproductive rights and the education of the girl child. On issues of leadership and governance, all three female councilors interviewed were actively involved in increasing female participation during the upcoming legislative and municipal elections while 95% of female respondents indicated that they will vote for female candidates during the elections. About 60% of women interviewed had already registered to vote. Seventeen (17) community facilitators have been put in place and they are continuing the process of sensitizing the target communities on issues of women rights. The evaluation also observed that project management comprised of dedicated individuals who were largely committed to the success of the project. The evaluation observed an internal control system which contributed to the efficiency of project management. Our findings indicated that the total budget for the project phase under review was 32.750.000 FRS. Given that about twelve thousand (12,000) persons (85% women) were reached directly by project activities, we can say that WEEP spent about two thousand seven hundred and thirty francs (2.730 FRS) per beneficiary which is relatively minimal. Project execution was therefore effective and efficient

 Seven (07) project outcomes were identified and their potentials for sustainability analyzed. The evaluation reveals that a pool of female activists and the trained community facilitators are within the project area and are actively engaged in activities that reinforce the ideals of the WEEP project. Female councilors have secure budgetary allocations for gender issues that can enable better collaboration between the councils and WEEP.

 It is highly recommended that WEEP should receive support for another phase with activities that meet the urgent felt needs for economic empowerment of the women in Fako and Meme Divisions of the South West Region. The support should include trainings as well as the provision of Seed Capital which ranges between 25.000FCFA and 50.000FCFA. This will tremendously give leverage and status to the women and enable them to make meaningful contributions in their homes, their Church and communities. WEEP management should engage a policy to maximize visibility of project activities through a website and actively seek alternative funding partners who could swell their program activities thus increasing their ability to serve more beneficiaries.

 

 

2.0The Women Education and Empowerment Program (WEEP).

2.1 Background:

The Women’s Education and Empowerment Program (WEEP) is a project of the Presbyterian Church in Cameroon (PCC) supported financially and technically (through a Transfer of Function office in Cameroon) by Bread for the World (BftW) in Stuttgart, Germany for which a Cooperation Agreement was signed between the BftW and PCC on February 22, 2005 and March 16th, 2005 respectively by the two organizations.

Phases one and two of the project were executed in Fako Division between 2005 and 2008 while the third phase was executed between January 2009 and December 2010 in Meme Division of the South West Region of Cameroon. Project activities were extended(forth phase) to several more villages in Meme Division from January 2011 to December 2012 because of the demands of communities that share similar socio cultural challenges. This extension sought to address the multiple problems of inadequate gender representation in decision making structures, discriminatory traditional practices, poor access to reproductive and property rights, poverty and bad governance; notably by increasing women’s participation in development and decision making processes as well as creating awareness on gender relations in the traditional structures that promote discriminatory traditional practices that marginalize women.

 

2.1.       Goal:

To increase women’s participation in development and decision making processes in the society

2.2.Objectives:

  1. To increase women’s participation in decision making structures and local governance processes
  2. To reduce women’s ignorance about their legal, inheritance and reproductive rights and responsibilities
  3. To improve on gender awareness among traditional rulers
  4. Improve on the level of education of women and their economic status.

 

2.4 Planned Activities during 2011 & 2012 in seventeen (17) communities.

 

Results

Activities

Indicators

Responsible

Collaborators

Resources

Women’s participation in decision making and local governance processes is enhanced Conduct sensitization meetings on the political participation of the woman. 673 women in seven (07) communities in 2011 sensitized on the political participation of the woman Project Management Local authorities,

Women group leaders,

Technical services,

Teachers,

Churches

 

Resource persons,

Transportation,

Feeding,

Media,

Airtime.

Organize Workshops on Strengthening women’s strategies for political leadership in municipal and legislative 138 women trained on strategies for political leadership in three (03) council areas in 2011

 

Project Management NGOs,

Women’s groups,

Advocacy organizations

 

Hall,

Resource persons,

Lodging,

Feeding, working materials,

Transportation,

Communication, media coverage

Association of Meme Female Politicians created in 2011 Project Management South West Female Mayors / Councilors Conference Registration,

Annual dues.

Coach on Strategies for Female Mobilization in the upcoming elections.

 

45 members of the South West Female Mayors Conference coached on mobilization techniques in 2011 Project Management NGOs,

Women’s groups,

Advocacy organizations

 

Hall,

Resource persons,

Lodging,

Feeding, working materials,

Transportation,

Communication, media coverage

Women knowledge on Self Reliant development increased Train on Economic skills. 300 women trained on Soap making and Cake icing in six (06) communities in 2011 Project Management Women & Men groups, local associations Hal,

Lodging,

Feeding, working materials,

Transportation,

Communication, media coverage

Conduct Sensitization meetings on economic potentials of the woman. 765 women in seven (17) communities sensitized in 2011 on the economic potentials of the woman Project Management Women & Men groups, local associations Hal,

Lodging,

Feeding, working materials,

Transportation,

Communication, media coverage

Women’s ignorance about their legal inheritance and reproductive rights and responsibilities reduced Conduct Grassroots training workshops on Gender and Women’s Rights 1.754 women trained on Gender & Women’s Rights in seventeen (17) communities in 2011 & 2012 Project Management Women & Men groups, local associations Hal,

Lodging,

Feeding, working materials,

Transportation,

Communication, media coverage

  Conduct sensitization meetings on the Education of the girl child and the legalization of marriages. 1.500 women sensitized on the need to attend school and legalize marriage in seventeen communities in 2011 & 2012 Project Management Women Groups and Associations, Churches. MINPROFF, MINAS.

 

Writing materials,

Resource persons,

Scholarships,

Transportation,

Communication,

  Conduct Mass marriages. 15 couples including one Mayor legalized their marriages in Konye town in 2011 Project Management Konye Council Hall, Feeding, Transportation, working materials, media
  Workshop on men and women together for the fight against Gender Based Violence (GBV). 23 participants (17) women trained on GBV in three council areas in 2012 Project Management Women & Men groups, local associations Hall,

Lodging,

Feeding, working materials,

Transportation,

Communication, media coverage

  Conduct Workshop for Traditional Rulers on Promoting women’s access and control over natural resources. 62 Traditional Authorities from two municipalities trained on Women access & control of natural resources in 2012 Project Management Traditional Councils Hal, Lodging,

Feeding, working materials,

Transportation,

Communication, media coverage

  Produce & disseminate News letter 2000 newsletters distributed in seventeen communities between 2011 & 2012 Project Management Media,

MINPROFF

Finance,

Transportation,

Communication

 

  Held Participatory Review Meetings.

 

Review meetings involving 590 stakeholders held in nine communities in 2011 & 2012 Project Management Community Facilitators Hall,

Feeding, working materials,

Transportation,

Communication

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.0 External Evaluation

In order to ascertain the degree of implementation of the objectives, activities, expected results and the corresponding impact the project had on the beneficiaries, the services of MUDEC-Group, a Service Provider based in Buea were retained (after a competitive bidding process) by WEEP management to carry out an external evaluation project activities between January 2011 and December 2012.

3.1 Rational:

This evaluation was conducted to primarily examine the level of the project implementation in line with the proposal that was submitted to BftW and to assess the visible and invisible project impact on the lives and livelihoods of its target beneficiaries. The evaluation shows the extent to which the project goal has been attained and it assesses the potentials and challenges that were encountered during implementation. This evaluation has also appreciated the extent of change that the beneficiary population has witnessed as a result of the project and the new trends in the beneficiary communities.

Precisely, the evaluation weighted heavily on the aspects identified below:

  • The institutional structure of the project, its staff capacity and examine its visibility in the communities of the project area covered by the project.
  • The relevance of the project to the beneficiaries within the socio-cultural milieu.
  • The effectiveness of the approaches/strategies applied and the impact resulting from the project implementation at the level of organizational management.
  • The level of participation of the beneficiaries
  • The implementation of Mainstreaming gender and HIV/AIDS at program and organizational levels
  • The Sustainability strategies of WEEP.

3.2 Objectives:

  1. Assess the project realization and the impact it has on the project area
  2. Assess the effectiveness and efficiency of the project management
  3. Assess the sustainability of the project outcomes after the end of the project phase
  4. Enable the project build on the results/recommendations of the evaluation and to

    consolidate the work that has been done in the previous project areas of Fako and Meme        divisions.

3.3. Scope of the Evaluation:

      Project activities were executed in seventeen (17) communities including Konye Town, Mbakwa Supe, Dikomi, Lobangi, Kang Barombi, Mambanda, Matoh, Kake II, Mbonge Maromba, Small Ekombe, Kwakwa, Dieka, Mukonje, Kosala, Timber Road, Diongo and Mokoko CDC. The evaluation was conducted in twelve (12) communities (representing 70% coverage) including Konye Town, Mbakwa Supe, Dikomi, Lobangi, Kang Barombi, Mambanda, Matoh, Kake II, Mbonge Maromba, Small Ekombe, Kwakwa and Dieka.

3.4. Evaluation Deliverables:

  • Ten (10) hard copies of the evaluation report.
  • One soft copy on CD.

 

3.5. Methodology & Operational Guide:

 

The evaluation was guided by the Terms of Reference (TOR) which was provided by WEEP management with focus on the objectives in 3.2 above. MUDEC constituted three teams comprising five (05) resource persons (three females and two males) to facilitate the evaluation exercise.  In order to enhance objectivity and transparency, key data collection and interpretation principles were adopted:

–          Participation: The evaluation team made use of various participatory techniques and tools to enable the active participation of the individuals and/or groups concerned in the evaluation.

–          Representative Sampling: MUDEC adopted sampling techniques, especially the simple random sampling to select representative samples for information collection. 300 beneficiaries from twelve (12) villages were contacted for this exercise representing 70% of the total communities (17) that were reached by WEEP during the period under review.

–          Gender Differentiation: Gender specific impacts were analyzed to come out with the benefits of the projects for men, women and youths. This was also done to assess the impact of gender relations within the target communities.

–          Triangulation: The team endeavored to systematically diversify its sources of information so as to confirm perceptions for an accurate description of the actual situation. 12 focus groups were constituted (one per village) to enable triangulation of information collected from target beneficiaries through questionnaires.

 

No. Municipality Villages Questionnaires administered Women Men Youth Traditional Leaders
1 Konye

 

Konye Town 25 15 5 4 1
2 Mbakwa Supe 25 15 5 4 1
3 Dikomi 28 20 5 2 1
  Lobangi 18 10 5 2 1
3 Kumba Central Kang Barombi 22 15 5 2 0
4 Mambanda 26 15 5 5 1
  Matoh 32 20 5 5 2
5 Kake II 23 15 5 2 1
6 Mbonge

 

Mbonge Maromba 31 20 5 5 1
7 Small Ekombe 19 10 5 3 1
8 Kwakwa 23 15 5 2 1
9 Dieka 28 20 5 2 1
Total     300 190 60 38 12

 

Operational Guide for the Evaluation.

 

Sequence Objective Activity Content Methodology
1 To know WEEP Acquire Knowledge of the organization and project. -Exploitation of documents

Finalization of the guidelines/questionnaires and checklists for the evaluation.

–  Meet the officials in charge of the project- PCC Moderator, Development Secretary, Coordinator of WEEP and other relevant staff.

–   Choice of documents to consult

–  Exploit, and analyze the documents.

–  Ask for complementary information.

II To have an evaluative view of the personnel, socio cultural groups (especially women), collaborators on the WEEP. Collection of data and consultation with stake holders 1– Meetings with Management Board and collaborators.

-Philosophy, vision, strategies.

-Management, internal control mechanism

-Sustainability of the project.

– Level of execution or Results achieved so far.

-Approach to work: choice of mechanisms and decision-making processes of management.

-Sustainability of the project, ideas on gender issues, appreciation of results, impacts and relationships.

2.  Meeting with socio cultural groups and women

-Influence of the WEEP on the development of group activities

-Benefits of the project to stakeholders (beneficiaries)

-Impact of training  and other services received

 

-Participatory observations

-Semi structured interviews –focus group discussions, administration of questionnaires

-Cross-checking and comparison of data

III Present the project and organization the way the evaluators see it.

–  Make proposals, recommendations in line with sustainable development actions.

Analysis of data -Assemble data

-Treatment of collected data

-Preparation of recommendations.

-Write a draft report.

-Team discussions

-Assign task to individual team members

  Collected data and draft report are corrected and validated by stakeholders. Restitution of data -organize restitution workshop with stakeholders.

– Restitute the collected and Analyzed data

-Validate data during meeting

-Visualized Presentation of draft report in a restitution meeting.

-Discussion/ improvements in plenary where necessary.

IV Help WEEP to have a concrete document that serves as a guide for improvement. Capitalization -Production of final report

-Handing in of report.

 

 

`          

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.6. Findings & Analysis (based on external evaluation objectives):

WEEP direct beneficiaries constitute rural and semi urban women whose ages range from 21 to 65. Most are farmers, petty traders or home makers who are holders of the Teacher Grades 1 & 2 Certificates (05%), the GCE Advance & Ordinary levels (10%), the First School Leaving Certificate (35%) or have never seen the four walls of a school (50%). Their average monthly income is less than thirty thousand francs (30.000 FRS). About 65% of women reached are cohabitating with a man in polygamous homes, 10% are single, 20% are widows and 5% are legally married. About 90% of WEEP beneficiaries hold leadership positions especially in religious (CWF) and tribal groups within their communities. The Birth rate is very high with families averaging between 5 to 8 children, who are mostly used as farm hands by their parents. Discussions on sexuality with spouses (if they can locate them) are still taboo to about 65% of beneficiaries. Two primary methods of family planning are being used by the women (condoms and ejaculation outside the virgina).

60% of Community Facilitators do not own Marriage Certificates. Most of the Chiefs reached share sympathy on the plight of their female subjects and agree to be resource persons to coach their peers but privately acknowledge that gender relations on reproductive and inheritance rights, polygamy and marriage certificates cannot be handled at the village level only. 55% of the men (both old and young) still nurture and harbor strong negative views on women reproductive and inheritance rights, polygamy and marriage certificates.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


3.6.1 Assess the project realization and the impact it has on the project area:

Quantitatively, all twelve (12) planned activities within seventeen (17) communities were executed thus representing 100% realization rate. Qualitatively, project activities were geared at resulting in behavioral and attitudinal changes with visible implications in men, women and youths.

 

No. Findings (Activities executed) Impact Analysis
1 Conduct 9 sensitization meetings on the political participation of the woman (3 per municipality).
  • About 12,000 persons were directly or indirectly reached with information relating to WEEP activities. Considering the social communication strategies amongst women, through many informal gatherings like hair making saloons, markets, njangis, tribal meetings, antinatal visits and Church announcements.
  • 85% of persons reached were women,
  • 80% of female councilors are actively preparing the women to register, vote and to make informed choices during the upcoming vote.

 

 

2 Organize Workshops on Strengthening women’s strategies for political leadership in municipal and legislative elections / Coach on Strategies for Female Mobilization in the upcoming elections.
  • 178 women leaders trained.
  • Local councils have earmarked funds in their 2013 budgets for gender related issues.
  • AFFCO (Association for Female Political Leaders) reinforced in Meme Division thus increasing women networking and monitoring of council activities.
  • AFFCO in collaboration with ELECAM are engaging programs on gender issues to educate women on their civic responsibilities.
  • 65% of women interviewed indicated their willingness to run for the upcoming council and parliamentary elections.
  • 85% of women contacted will vote for female candidates during the upcoming council elections.
  • All five female Councilors and Deputy Mayors interviewed indicated that they will present their candidatures for the upcoming local elections.
3 Conduct Sensitization meetings on economic potentials of the woman.
  • 300 women trained on Soap making and Cake icing in six (06) communities in 2011.
  • 765 women in seven (17) communities sensitized in 2011 on the economic potentials of the woman.
  • All women and men interviewed support an economic agenda (train & support with seed capital) for WEEP beneficiaries
4 Conduct Grassroots training workshops on Gender and Women’s Rights v  1.754 women trained on Gender & Women’s Rights in seventeen (17) communities in 2011 & 2012
5 Conduct sensitization meetings on the Education of the girl child and the legalization of marriages.
  • 1.500 women sensitized on the need for girls to attend school and legalize marriage in seventeen communities in 2011 & 2012.
  • All female respondents acknowledge they feel freer to discuss sexuality with their partners.
  • All female respondents insist they will support their girl child to attend school.
  • All women interviewed indicate they no longer insist that their daughters follow them to the farm during school periods
  • All female respondents affirm the woman’s right to have a marriage certificate and are willing to offer advice and encouragement for the acquisition of same.
  • All female respondents affirm the woman’s right to inherit land.
  • All female respondents affirm women’s right to own land and are willing to protect this position.
  • 95% of women insist they will encourage their daughters to own marriage certificates.
6 Conduct Mass marriages. ü  Fifteen Couples legally married including one Mayor.

ü  Pastor of Mambanda Parish suspended 2 young Christians who deliberately refused to legalize their weddings. This is an enforcement strategy to that will be emulated by other pastors.

ü  Demand for this service has sky rocketed in all neighboring communities.

7 Workshop on men and women together for the fight against Gender Based Violence (GBV).
  • 23 participants (17) women trained on GBV in three council areas in 2012.
  • More follow up coaching are planned to take place during regularly scheduled neighborhood meetings.
8 Conduct Workshop for Traditional Rulers on Promoting women’s access and control over natural resources. v  62 Traditional Authorities from two municipalities trained on Women access & control of natural resources in 2012.

v  9 Traditional Authorities have opted to serve as resource persons to influence the thinking of their peers.

9 Produce & disseminate News letter
  • 2000 newsletters distributed in seventeen communities between 2011 & 2012
10 Held Participatory Review Meetings.

 

ü  Review meetings involving 590 stakeholders held in nine communities in 2011 & 2012.

ü  The culture of review meetings has been accepted by community facilitators who will regularly conduct one

 

 

3.6.2 Assess the effectiveness and efficiency of the project management.

The evaluation reviewed the WEEP structure, personnel, equipment and financial resources that were put in place for the realization of planned activities. The analyses below are representative of the information collected.

 

3.6.2.1 WEEP Organizational Structure:

 

Management Board

Coordinator

Field Staff 01

Field Staff 02

Cashier

Community Facilitators

Other Local Partners

Target Beneficiaries

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


There are 6 Management Board members (4) female and 4 staff (all females) who were involved respectively in policy matters and project execution. The Board quarterly reviewed the progress of project implementation.

A Project Coordinator managed the day-to-day activities. She was assisted by 2 field staff and a secretary – cashier who were recruited through a competitive interview process..

The PCC (through WEEP management) was responsible for financial management through the signing of the bank booklet after request by the Coordinator for budgeted and approved action plans. This constituted the main feature within the internal control system on finances. An external audit of project accounts was also planned at the end of this project phase.

 

 

 

 

 

3.6.2.2 Staff:

No

Name Position Held Contact
1 Rev. Mary Wose Coordinator 79 42 14 71
2 Mrs. Mojoko Pauline Ndeh Cashier 75 75 39 23
3 Joseline Liengu Field Staff 01 74 63 11 59
4 Susan Ameh Field Staff 02 77 97 09 62

 

3.6.2.3 Weep Equipment:

WEEP has an office space (which is shared between the Coordinator and the field staff) equipped with furniture (2 tables and 3 chairs), 1 Computer and printer (currently non functional), training materials, office supplies, internet access

3.6.2.4  Analysis on the Effectiveness of Project Management:

 

–          The WEEP Board meets 3 times annually. Some members showed limited mastery of project activities as well as knowledge on fundraising. Consequently, Resource Mobilization is abandoned to the Board Chairperson and the Coordinator.

–          In sharing one office space, the Coordinator was handicap when discussing policy matters which sometimes were prematurely discussed with others by the staff.

–          The staff is dedicated and with diverse professional backgrounds which can contribute positively toward effective project execution.

–          The staff clearly understood and shared in the spirit of the project goals and objectives though apparently possessing low capacities to take initiatives.

–          There was joint (participatory) budgeting of field operations.

–          WEEP management put in place an internal control system which involved request and authorization to make justified expenditures, disbursement of funds, acquisition of assets and documentation in a register,

–          The selected communities for the project were appropriate because they are representative of male domination and have high incidences of low school attendance records for children especially the girl child. In these communities, Traditional Authorities and men consider women as “baby making machines and farm hands”.

 

3.6.2.5  Analysis on the Efficiency of Project Management:

 

v  Budget analysis indicate that about 85% was spent on core activities including transportation while about 15% was spent on administration including salaries, board expenses during meetings, overheads and materials. This budgetary spread enabled the very high rate of project execution.

v  Most (90%) activities were executed by project field staff thus reducing the high costs associated with the use of external facilitators.

v  Project activities benefited mostly rural women who are usually eager to put knowledge gained into practice especially on social and economic issues.

v  The project was primarily geared towards empowering the inner self which is usually slow to manifest and difficult to evaluate in the short and medium term.

v  The operational budget for the project phase under review stood at 32.750.000 FCFA. About 12.000 persons were reached either directly or indirectly during the course of the project execution. This translates into 2.730 FCFA spent to reach, sensitize or train a beneficiary.

v  From local realities when compared to figures of 5.000 FCFA per beneficiary, one can conveniently state that the WEEP utilized fewer resources to make the required initial impact. Usually, several years are needed to make a lasting impact

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


3.6.3 Assess the sustainability of the project outcomes after the end of the project phase:

6 project outcomes were identified and  below is an analysis on how each can enhance the sustainability of the project.

 

No Project Outcome Aspects of Sustainability
1 10% increase in the number of motivated and proactive women leaders in target communities.
  • Motivated and proactive women have organized several sensitization meetings and radio talk shows. An Association of female political leaders has been reinforced. Empowerment of women’s groups and advocates of gender equality and good governance with skills, which they are continuously using, is keeping project gains and memories alive.
  • Pertinent issues that were raised during project implementation are common place in several discussions on gender and women rights.
  • AFFCO in collaboration with MINPROFF and UNIFEM are contributing towards the national debate on Instituting a Gender Policy in Cameroon.
2 Pool of  17 trained community facilitators

 

.

 

  • A Pool of trained resource persons including 17 community facilitators, 9 Traditional Authorities, 5 Clergy and 170 representatives of women groups have been identified within the 17 communities who will continuously reinforce aspects of the project (a case relates to the Pastor of Mambanda congregation, who suspended two male Christians in order to enforce their acquisition of marriage certificates).
  •  Further training and coaching at grassroots levels are being conducted whenever there are public manifestations and gatherings of the rural as well as urban women.
  • The Clergy in the project area are using sermons in Churches and bible lessons to continuously reinforce aspects of the project.
  • Workshop reports on gender and women’s rights are serving as a working document for grassroots training after the project.
  • The 2000 Newsletters (Smiling Women) centered on gender issues are available printed material in the households of beneficiaries which are serving regular reference, review and reminder purposes.

 

3 Creation & Reinforced functioning of the Association of Female Politicians (AFFCO). that is determined to protect and institute knowledge acquired.
  • These female councilors regularly mobilize female grass root militants for political participation (obtain National Identity Cards, Register to Vote, Choice of Candidates, Women Friendly Voting Strategies).
4 The current 2013 budgets of Konye, Kumba 1 and Mbonge councils have allocations for Gender Issues.
  • Gender Responsive Budgeting in local councils is also being used by some women activists to lobby councils reduce bottlenecks on the issuance of marriage certificates.
  • Increased Potentials for collaboration between local councils and WEEP
5 Increased awareness on the reproductive rights of women.

 

  • About 75% of women interviewed regularly use contraceptives (natural or otherwise), while about 9 out of every ten girl or single woman interviewed attest to buying condoms for safe keeping “should in case.”
  • 90% of women who are less 50years of age regularly check their HIV/AIDS status to be sure of themselves and to take corrective actions if necessary.
  • All women indicated that they regularly discuss sexuality with their spouses and freely discuss same during meetings on these topics.
6
Monitoring and Evaluation Plan

 

  • Monitoring and follow up of project trainings are discussed during regularly scheduled by the community facilitators.
  • An external evaluation at the end of the project has just been concluded in which pertinent recommendations have been proposed to the benefit both the project management and the target populations.  

 


3.6.4 Enable the project build on the results/recommendations of the evaluation and to consolidate the work that has been done in the previous project areas of Fako and Meme divisions:

(Most of the recommendations of the last evaluation have actually been respected. However, new challenges (based on the demands of the target beneficiaries) have surfaced as current realities require adjusting the focus of future WEEP activities.

In order to build on project gains and to ensure that knowledge acquired can be effectively implemented by beneficiaries, the following suggestions should be highly considered:

 

 

  • Organize training for the WEEP Board members and staff on Resource Mobilization, project Planning Monitoring & Evaluation and Organizational Development. Solicit Funding for this training from the EU / PASC Program which is ongoing.
  • The WEEP should maintain a Webpage on the PCC Website as a strategy for Visibility and Fundraising.
  • Produce a Manual on all WEEP Interventions (capitalization) and Disseminate hundreds of copies to all past and present Community Facilitators, Traditional Authorities, the Clergy and representatives of women groups in all target communities. This will reinforce proximity coaching, follow up and sustainability of project gains.
  • Develop initial proposals for collaboration with MINPROFF and local councils (Konye, Kumba 1 & Mbonge) on Mass Marriages. Engage the United Councils and Cities of Cameroon (UCCC South West) to reflect on the institutionalization of Marriage Certificates in all councils within the region.
  • Reinforce training of Traditional Authorities at Sub Divisional Chief Conference Levels or Divisional Chiefs Conference Levels (Fako & Meme) where cultural issues such as land ownership and reproductive rights can be effectively discussed and decisions implemented. (Decisions on socio cultural issues at the village level can not be binding on the tribe or the clan).
  • Organize Round Table Conferences that bring together all stakeholders (at community level) to discuss “Face to Face” on burning Socio Cultural Issues (land ownership, reproductive rights, marriage certificates, education of children, local elections & the vote).
  • Segment target beneficiaries (based on age groups and expressed needs) for specific knowledge transfer. The active population need more knowledge on reproductive rights (including emphasis on the use of female condoms) and legalized marriages while widows and women above 45 need more economic empowerment. All groups need to vote and to have their economic initiatives supported.
  • Intensify partnerships for Alternative Funding that benefits Income Generating Activities (self reliance / economic empowerment of WEEP beneficiaries. This should include the possibilities of provision of seed capital (average request is between 25.000 FCFA and 50.000FCFA). At the national level, WEEP should request for collaboration with organizations such as Heifer Project International Cameroon based in Nkwen, Bamenda that support livestock activities. Contacts should be developed with other national programs such as the Program to Support Actors in the Informal Sector (PIAISI), the National Employment Fund (NEF) and other programs in the Agriculture sub sector.
  • At the International level there are feminist and gender active organizations such as the African Women Development Foundation (AWDF), Virginia Giles Foundation (VGIF), the Turing Foundation, the Cordaid Foundation, the Women Inter Church Foundation, MIVA Austria & Poland that should be highly solicited for assistance which could tremendously improve the living conditions of WEEP target beneficiaries. Carefully crafted cover letters may be required from the PCC, BftW, and Mission 21 for these partnerships to be concretized.
  • The WEEP should prepare an Action Plan 2013 to 2015 that is guided by the MDGs as well as Cameroon’s Vision 2035. This will better integrate the target beneficiaries into the country’s development efforts.
  • A Project Mid Term Assessment should be envisioned at the end of 2016 which should give an insight on concrete realizations of the WEEP.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.0 Challenges

To change mentalities, habits and attitudes on social and cultural aspects of life in rural settings requires patience and immense resolve. The target groups for WEEP activities constitute individuals who over the years have experienced untold sufferings and hardships due to generally acceptable societal norms in typically male dominated communities. Consequently, project challenges can be expected to be diverse and cumbersome. These include:

 

  1. Traditional Authorities and men within these communities still consider women as farm hands and baby making machines. These individuals harbor strong feelings on women rights. Overcoming these negative feelings will certainly take a long time and maximum patience is required.
  2. The women themselves present a challenge in some cases where they have resigned themselves to their fate and even resort to competition for the husbands, jealousy, and animosity due in large part to ignorance. The project will need extra coaching on group dynamics.
  3. The project area is located in settings where the roads are impassable during the rainy season, thus increasing costs associated with project execution. The bad roads also reduce the movement of persons as well as goods thus decreasing the degree of participation during project activities.
  4. Community facilitators and other resource persons are somewhat expectant of financial compensation for their time even though the accrued benefits are for the community at large.
  5. Insufficient monitoring by community facilitators as field trips often required finances which they are unable to generate.

5.0 Recommendations (please see 3.6.4. above)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6.0 Conclusion

The WEEP project has been executed in the South West Region of Cameroon since 2005. It has primarily made enough gains in the area of awareness creation. Several individuals in target communities are currently able to freely discuss issues related to sexuality, land ownership, reproductive rights, polygamy and the education of the girl child. Many resource persons including pastors, teachers and politicians have taken note on the need to ameliorate the socio cultural conditions of the rural woman. The changes are certainly bound to be evolutionary which is time consuming. Executing a project with such sensitive topics on the culture of people in rural settings is not commonplace. Gender gaps in access and control of natural resources are a result of years of discrimination. They will not disappear in a hurry. The involvement of the clergy is clearly a positive aspect toward project sustainability as well.

The project has catalyzed the thinking of community members toward the right direction on issues of women human, social and economic rights.

 Several outcomes have been put in place that will ensure that project gains are not lost. Networking and the involvement of gender sensitive institutions such as MINPROFF and commitment from the local councils will go a long way to protect these gains.

 

 WEEP management should pay close attention to the recommendations especially those that hinge on the felt needs of beneficiaries who are yearning for effective economic empowerment which should go beyond training and provide seed capital. WEEP should put in place an action plan for 2013 to 2015 guided by the dictates of the Millennium Development Goals. The project should envision a Project Impact Assessment by the end of 2016 that will give an insight on concrete achievements that go beyond awareness creation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7.0. Annexes

7.1. WEEP Call for External Evaluation Tender.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7.2. External Evaluation Team:

 

No Name Function Contact
1 Charlie Mbonteh Team Leader / Supervision 77 64 94 30 / 94 34 43 52

mudecgroup@yahoo.com /mudecgroup@gmail.com

www.mudecgroup.org

2 Lawong Judith Consultant / Analysis & Interpretation 75 00 77 88
3 Henry Ngole Data Collection 78 24 21 88
4 Atem Eugene Data Collection 74 50 59 95
5 Nong Theodora M. Capitalization 75 81 66 63

 

7.3. List of Persons contacted:

 

7.3.1. Board Members:

No

Name Contact
1 Rev. Besong Johnson 77 27 38 59
2 Rev. Ngwa Hosea 77 80 58 64
3 Rev. Mary Wose 79 42 14 71
4 Mrs. Ndive Fanny Namondo 77 68 20 38
5 Mrs. Mojoko Pauline Ndeh 75 75 39 23

 

7.3.2. WEEP Staff:

No

Name Position Held Contact
1 Rev. Mary Wose Coordinator 79 42 14 71
2 Mrs. Mojoko Pauline Ndeh Cashier 75 75 39 23
3 Joseline Liengu Field Staff 01 74 63 11 59
4 Susan Ameh Field Staff 02 77 97 09 62

 

7.3.3. Female Councilors / Secretary Generals of Councils:

No

Name Council Contact

1

Mrs. Alice Balemba Konye 77 78 50 95

2

Mrs. Okie Susan Mbonge 75 58 81 72

3

Mrs. Ntungwe Pamela Kumba I 79 64 36 75

 

7.3.4. Community Facilitators:

No Community Name Contact
1 Mbonge Maromba Mokambe Flora 77 04 15 30
2 Small Ekombe Tah Magaret 74 59 57 78 / 75 47 63 61
3 Kwakwa Kate Ngoe  74 88 11 76
4 Dieka Fuh Delphine 78 27 41 28
5 Barombi Kang Suka Anastasia 77 02 10 43
6 Mambanda Eyong Joan   77 21 60 26
7 Kake II Ndombo Martha 77 26 54 06
8 Konye Alice Balimba 77 78 50 95
9 Mbakwa Supe Uriah Odine 70 93 42 60
10 Dikomi Nkah Agie  75 83 98 82
11 Lobangi Rev. Ndam Elias 75 40 55 83
12 Matoh Ngoe Gladys  70 32 14 76

 

 

 

7.3.5. Traditional / Religious Authorities Contacted:

No. Village Traditional Authority Religious Authority
1 Mbonge Chief Daniel Moffa Mokambe Rev. Abangma Elias Agbor

 77 27 83 26

2 Small Ekombe Chief Ote Bebe Fabia Rev. Festus Enuge Mesumbe

 77 18 64 00

3 Dieka Chief Ndiba Oscar  
4 Barombi Kang   Rev. Angafuh Augustine Fonsoh

77 02 38 87

5 Ngolo Bolo Chief Ngoe  Awudu  
6 Dikomi Chief Sona Makia  
7 Dipenda Bakundu Chief Bekindaka Sakwe  
8 Sambaliba Chief Mukundu Martin  
9 Matoh

 

Chief John Itoe       Rev. Agbor Williams

74 79 57 11

10 Matoh Chief Mekumba  

 

7.3.6. Contact Persons in Mbonge:

No

Name Profession Contact
1 Epupu  Pauline Farmer  
2 Lucy Mekwe House Wife  
3 Nolinga Felicia House Wife  
4 Ekoko Sophie Diale Secretary  
5 Bridget Sem Farmer 75760600
6 Nolinga Mercy Farming 70434411
7 Mokake Mercy Teaching 75207552
8 Nzeba  Racheal Farming 77381838
9 Akuma Mary Teaching 77395690
10 Helen Ngah House Wife 78802988

 

7.3.7. Contact Persons in Mbakwa Supe:

No Name Profession Contact
1 Fanny Penda Farmer  
2 Mukete Alice Farmer  
3 Etinge Christian Farmer  
4 Yoni Susan Farmer  
5 Mosima Magdaline House wife  
6 Bweh Celine Hair Dresser  
7 Lokndo Olivia Farmer  
8 Butana Victorine Petit Business  
9 Frida Ngoe Farming  
10 Bokusa Jacobine Petit Business  

 

7.3.8. Contact Persons in Small Ekombe:

No Name Profession Contact
1 Tah Margaret Farmer  
2 Vagacy Dorothy Farmer  
3 edumbe Christian Farmer  
4 Philomena Ache Farmer  
5 Rose Ocie Farmer  
6 Vivian neba Farmer  
7 Lum Monica Maggi Business  
8 Susan Eben Business  
9 Martha Okafor Business  
10 Abangma Serah Housewife 77395810

 

7.3.9. Contact Persons in Kwakwa:

No Name Profession Contact
1 Tase Verona Business 77607824
2 Liwo Rose Business 79709650
3 Martha Nakomo Business  
4 Esther Tita Farmer  
5 Fulem Mary Farmer  
6 Tenject Elizabeth Farmer  
7 Pauline Njeck Business  
8 Timben Pauline Business  
9 Sarah Takoh Farmer  
10 Tah Celine Farmer  

 

 

7.3.10. Contact Persons in Dieka:

No Name Profession Contact
1 Fuh  Delphine Farmer 71467068
2 Anna Ebako Farmer  
3 Mary Esembe Farmer 78408836
4 Eko Easter Farmer 76820567
5 Nji Roseline Hair Dresser  
6 Dibande Malga Farmer 72068866
7 Rose Abwa Petit Business  
8 Epong Mukete Farming 71515466
9 Elizabeth Ngoh Petit Business  
10 Etoa Katerine Farming 71471470

 

7.3.11. Contact Persons in Barombi Kang:

No Name Profession Contact
1 Awa Dorothy Farmer  
2 Che Beatrice Farmer  
3 Ajuh Grace Farmer  
4 Adangwa Martha Farmer  
5 Elonge Elizabeth Hair Dresser  
6 Ekwoge Marcy Farmer  
7 Numfor Ostencia Petit Business  
8 Endum Celine Farming  
9 Ebanek Martha Petit Business  
10 Ebong Judith House wife  

 

7.3.12. Contact Persons in Mambanda:

No Name Profession Contact
1 1 Che Eveline House wife  
2 Jessy Sona Farmer  
3 Yemi Florence Farmer  
4 Sona Beltha Farmer  
5 Njana Pauline Farmer  
6 Ajabai Rose House wife  
7 Ange Regina Farmer  
8 Ruth Abegitue Farmer  
9 Suh Rachaeal Farmer  
10 Tinah Comfort Farmer  

 

 

 

7.3.13. Contact Persons in Kake II:

No Name Profession Contact
1 Theodora Bichani Farmer  
2 Mangong Margret Farmer  
3 Gladies Tah Farmer  
4 Victorine Ndaga Farmer  
5 Jeosophine Betapo House wife  
6 Regina Ogie Farmer  
7 Anastasia Mosowell Farmer  
8 Susan Acho Farmer  
9 Balimba Magdaline Farmer  
10 Stella Manjo House wife  

 

 

 

7.3.14. Contact Persons in Dikomi:

No Name Profession Contact
1 Kang Julie Ekume Farmer  
2 Ekah Agnes Farmer 75 83 98 82
3 Edum Jacqueline Farmer 75 31 60 03
4 Ewang Hannah Farmer  
5 Echawah Ernestine Farmer  
6 Ewane Magdalene House wife  
7 Ejuje Alice Farmer  
8 Mary Opoh Farmer  
9 Akwaya Hannah Farmer  
10 Nzogge Grace Dione Farmer  

 

 

7.3.15. Contact Persons in Lobangi:

No Name Profession Contact
1 Etumbe Regina Ndie Farmer  
2 Ewange Alice Farmer  
3 Penda Fanny Farmer  
4 Lobe Helen Farmer  
5 Njimbong Gladys House wife  
6 Mofa Pauline Hair Dresser  
7 Akama-Makia Baliki Farmer  
8 Meboka Emilia Petit Business  
9 Balemba Grace Farming  
10 Nnoko Angeline Petit Business  

 

 

7.3.16. Contact Persons in Matoh:

No Name Profession Contact
1 Etongwe Florence Hair Dresser  
2 Itoe Frida Farmer  
3 Mboe Jennet Petit Business  
4 Sakwe Beatrice Farming  
5 Ngoe Mirabel Petit Business  
6 Itoe Pauline Farmer  
7 Makane Frida Farmer  
8 Joan Embe Farmer  
9 Moleka Juliana Farmer  
10 Monie Jacobine House wife  

 

 

 

 

 

 7.3.17. Contact Persons in Konye:

No Name Profession Contact
1 Modika Monica Farmer  
2 Mercy Kien Lyonga Farmer  
3 Bebololaka Violet Farmer  
4 Kindem Rose Farmer  
5 Otto Gladys Hair Dresser  
6 Itoe Lucy Farmer  
7 Mukete Raheal Petit Business  
8 Mercy Eke Farming  
9 Motase Sidoline Petit Business  
10 Mella Edith House wife  

 

 

7.3.18. Male Beneficiaries Contacted:

No Names Village No Names Village
1 Laban Diongo      Dieka 15 Musi Philip     Small Ekombe
2 Mokube Linus        Dieka 16 Tah Manfred      Small Ekombe
3 Elangwe Jacob       Dieka 17 Bah Theophilus      Mambanda
4 Diang Jonathan Young     Small Ekombe 18 Undatou Samson   Mambanda
5 Ojeh Kingsley   Small Ekombe 19 Mokube Samuel      Mambanda
6 Nzume Lord White   Dikomi 20 Ameyumbi James     Mambanda
7 Abango Peter       Dikomi 21 Itoe John Kosa Mambanda
8 Achuonoh Jonathan       Dikomi 22 Bingeh James Mambanda
9 Epie Spivac Uko     Dikomi 23 Mbah Henry Tembi       Matoh
10 London Edward       Matoh 24 Agie David      Matoh
11 Misodi James       Matoh 25 Masango Joel          Matoh
12 Peter Motale     Matoh 26 Motale Ezekiel       Matoh
13 Elias Moffa          Matoh 27 Iyambe  Walters       Matoh
14 Takwa Daniel     Matoh      

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7.4. Photo Gallery:

Discussions in Small Ekombe

Discussions were revealing

Interview with Board Member

Coordinator’s Views

Interviews in Barombi Kang

Focus Group in Barombi Kang

Focus Group in Mbakwa Supe

Focus Group with Staff & Board

Discussion with Board Secretary

Focus Group in Dikomi

Focus Group in Matoh

Focus Group in Mbonge

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Restitution/Validation & Press Conference

Restitution/Validation & Family Photo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7.5. Samples of Data Collection Tools:

 

Questionnaire for WEEP Beneficiaries

 

This questionnaire is aimed at evaluating the activities of the WEEP Project that were carried out in the Meme Division between 2011 and 2012. We will therefore be very grateful if you answer these questions as sincerely as possible. The information that you provide will remain confidential. Thank You!

 

A. Personal Information

 

  1. Occupation:________________________________________________________
  2. What is your level of education:_______________________________________
  3. Sex:                 Female           Male
  4. Age group:  15-25 ,      26-35    ,    36-45   ,    46-55        , 56+     .
  5. Community:___________________________ Council _________________
  6. Marital Status: Single  ,   Married   ,    Divorced    ,   Widow      , Widower      .
  7. If you are married, do you have a marriage certificate?      Yes       No      
  8. When did you obtain your marriage certificate? _____________________

 

B. Women Leadership/ Gender awareness for women trained

  1. Do you belong to any group? Political, Cultural, Religious, Others___________________
  2. Do you hold any leadership position? Yes        No   
  3. What group(s): _____________________
  4. What position is it? __________________________
  5. What major problems do you face in carrying out your functions as a leader? ___
  6. Do your male colleagues support you?         Yes     No      
  7. If no, give reasons why?
  8. When were you elected into office? _________________
  9. What made you to go in for this position? _____________
  10. Do you intend to go in for the next elections? ______ Why? ___________

For Leaders

  1. Do you consider women’s welfare in your decision making?    Yes      No
  2. If yes, which decisions have you changed or implemented to favor women’s welfare? __________________________________________________________
  3. If no, Why? _______________________________________________________
  4. Do you involve women in decision making in your institution? _______
  5. If no, Why? _______________________________________________________
  6. Are there some positions you reserved only for men? _____________________
  7. If yes, which positions? ______________________________________________

C. Reproductive Rights

  1. Who is the head of your household/family? ______________________________
  2. How do you assist your spouse in running your home? _____________________
  3. Do you discuss sexuality with your spouse? ______________________________
  4. If no, why? ________________________________________________________
  5. If yes, why? _______________________________________________________
  6. How many children do you have? ______________________________________
  7. How many girls? _______________     How many boys? ___________________
  8. Do they all go to school? Yes        No     
  9. If no state why? _________________________________­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­______________
  10. What other training do you give your girl child who is not in school? __________
  11. Are you aware of any birth control method? Yes       ,   No
  12. If yes, state the specific one you know __________________________________
  13. How did you know about it? __________________________________________
  14. Do you practice it? Yes           No
  15. If no, say why______________________________________________________
  16. If yes, say why _____________________________________________________
  17. Have you ever done HIV/AIDS voluntary screening?  Yes         No
  18. If yes how many times? ______________________________________________
  19. When was the last time you did it? _____________________________________
  20. If yes, why is it important to do it? _____________________________________
  21. If no, say why _____________________________________________________

D. Legal and Inheritance Rights

How has the WEEP workshop helped you to:

  1. Buy and own landed property _________________________________________
  2. Inherit property (Landed property) _____________________________________
  3. Obtain  Marriage Certificate ________________________________________
  4. Obtain Birth Certificate__________________________________________
  5. Do you own land? __________________________________________________
  6. How did you obtain it?  A) Bought,  B)  Inherit, C) Gift, D) Others ________
  7. When did you acquire it? _________________________

E. Women Education

  1. How has the WEEP workshop improved

a)      Your level of awareness? _______________________________________

b)      The education of your girl child? _________________________________

c)      The empowerment of your female house help? ______________________

Questionnaire for WEEP Community Facilitators

A. Personal Information

  1. Occupation:________________________________________________________
  2. What is your level of education:________________________________________
  3. Sex:                 Female           Male
  4. Age group:   15-25,    26-35    , 36-45      , 46-55     , 56+     .
  5. Community:_________________________ Council __________
  6. Marital Status: Single,  Married    ,  Divorced     , Widow      , Widower      .
  7. Do you have a marriage certificate? __________ when did you acquire it? ________
  8. How has the knowledge acquired from WEEP benefited your marriage? __

 

B. Training on Facilitation

  1. What facilitating /communication/mobilization skills have you acquired from the training? ____
  2. How have you been using these skills? ____
  3. How were you functioning as a community facilitator during the project? ……
  4. What problems/challenges do you face in performing your functions? _____
  5. What documents/guide are you using as a facilitator in your community? ______
  6. How have you been using it? ____________________
  7. What problems do you have using it? _________________
  8. How have you been relating with other women network? ____________
  9. How have the knowledge acquired from WEEP project benefited your community? _________
  10. Which M&E tools do you master? ________________
  11. How do you use them? ____________________
  12. How do you use your skills as a community facilitator? (For the Clergy only) ___

 

Women Leadership/ Gender awareness

  1. Do you belong to any group? Political, Cultural, Religious, Others___________________
  2. Do you hold any leadership position? Yes          No  
  3. What group(s): _____
  4. What position is it? _____________
  5. What major problems do you face in carrying out your functions as a leader? ____
  6. Do your male colleagues support you? Yes        No      
  7. If No, give reasons why?
  8. When were you elected into office? _____
  9. What made you to go in for this position? ____________
  10. Do you intend to go in for the next elections? ______ Why? _______

 

C. Reproductive Rights

  1. Who is the head of your household/family? ________
  2. How do you assist your spouse in running your home? ________
  3. Do you discuss sexuality with your spouse? ____________________
  4. If no, why? _______________________
  5. If yes, why? ________________________
  6. How many children do you have? ___________________________
  7. How many girls? _______________              How many boys? _________
  8. Do they all go to school? Yes         No     
  9. If no state why? _________________________________­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­______
  10. What other training do you give your girl child who is not in school? ____
  11. Are you aware of any birth control method?      Yes          No
  12. If yes, state the specific one you know __________
  13. How did you know about it? ______________________
  14. Do you practice it?          Yes           No
  15. If no, say why________________
  16. If yes, say why ____________________________________
  17. Have you ever done HIV/AIDS voluntary screening Yes          No
  18. If yes, how many times? ____________________________
  19. When was the last time you did it? ____________
  20. If yes, why is it important to do it? _________________
  21. If no, say why _________________

D. Legal and Inheritance Rights

How has the WEEP workshop helped you to:

  1. Buy and own landed property ________________________
  2. Inherit property (Landed property) ___________________
  3. Obtain Marriage Certificate ______________
  4. Obtain Birth Certificate _________________
  5. Do you own land? ________________________
  6. How did you obtain it?  A) Bought,  B)  Inherit,  C) Gift, D) Others __
  7. When did you acquire it? _________________________

 

Questionnaire for Female Councilors

 

A. Personal Information

  1. What is your constituency? ____________
  2. What position do you hold in your council? ____
  3. How were you voted? __________________________
  4. Age group:     15-25,      26-35,        36-45,         46-55,        56+     .
  5. Marital Status:    Single,      Married,     Divorced      Widow      Widower     
  6. Are you legally married? _______________
  7. How has the knowledge acquired from WEEP benefited your marriage?_

B. Leadership

  1. What functions do your perform in the council? _____
  2. What major problems do you face in carrying out your functions as a leader?
  3. How are you using knowledge gained to influence male dominateed decisions?…………………………………………………………….
  4. What made you to go in for this position_________________________
  5. Do you consider women’s welfare in your decision making? Yes       No
  6. If yes, which decisions have you changed or implemented to favor women’s welfare? ______
  7. If no, why? ____________
  8. Do you involve women in decision making in your institution? _
  9. If no, why? ________
  10. Are there some positions you reserved only for men? __________
  11. If yes, Which positions? ______________________________________
  12. How has the knowledge acquired from WEEP benefited your council? ___
  13. Is there an ‘association of Meme Female Councilors’? ____________
  14. If no why? __________________________________________________
  15. If yes, what are its’ functions? __________________________________
  16. Do you intend to go in for the next elections? _______________________

C. Reproductive/Legal Rights

  1. Who is the head of your household/family? ________________________
  2. How do you assist your spouse in running your home? _______________
  3. Do you discuss sexuality with your spouse? ________________________
  4. If no why? __________________________________________________
  5. If yes why? _________________________________________________
  6. How many children do you have? ________________________________
  7. How many girls? _______________              How many boys? _________
  8. Do they all go to school? Yes      No     
  9. If no state why? _________________________________­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­____________
  10. What other training do you give your girl child who is not in school? ___
  11. Have you ever done HIV/AIDS voluntary screening?  Yes         No
  12. If yes how many times? ________________________________________
  13. When was the last time you did it? _______________________________
  14. Why is it important to do it? ____________________________________
  15. If no, say why _______________________________________________
  16. Do you own land? ____________________________________________
  17. If yes, how did you obtain it?  A) Bought,  B)  Inherit  C) Gift, D) Others _

153How has the knowledge acquired from WEEP benefited your personal life?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Questionnaire for Traditional Authorities & Male Beneficiaries:

 

  1. Occupation:________________________________________________________
  2. What is your level of education:________________________________________      
  3. Age group:  15-25     26-35    , 36-45       46-55     , 56+     .
  4. Village:________________________
  5. Marital Status: Single,     Married,          Divorce        Widower    
  6. How many wives do you have? …………….. .
  7. Which birth control methods do you know?…. Do you practice it?…… How?…
  8. Do you discuss family planning with her / them? How often?……….
  9. Do you have a marriage certificate? _____When did you acquire it? ________
  10. How has the knowledge acquired from WEEP benefited your marriage? __
  11. How and When did you become Traditional Ruler? ………………………
  12. Are there female traditional councilors in your village?…….. why? …. How many?…………….  What efforts have you made to include women? ……
  13. Do you discuss gender issues during traditional council meetings? Which do you discuss? …………….
  14. Do you handle gender related cases in your council?… Which?… How?….
  15. Do you have a daughter?……… Does she go to school? …. Why?………………..
  16. Can women in your community own land and other natural resources?…..
  17. Can women in your village inherit land? ………………………
  18. Would be willing to hand over land to your married or unmarried daughter? Why?………….
  19. Would you encourage your daughter to get into a polygamous marriage?….. Why?
  20. What roles do women and the youths play in various development efforts in your community?
  21. What are some of the obstacles that prevent youths and women participation in local activities?
  22. Are you aware of cultural practices that hinder the growth of women and youths?
  23. What efforts are you making to reduce negative cultural practices against women?
  24. Do you discuss the plight of women with other chiefs of other villages?… How, When & Where? ………………………………………………….

 

Track II Project to Institutionalize Gender Responsive Budgeting in Councils of the South West Region of Cameroon.

 

 

 

Submitted to:  UN Women.

Submitted by: MUDEC Group.

Submitted on: 30th October, 2012

 

 

 

Proposal Template

Civil Society Grant Application

“Increasing Accountability in Financing for Gender Equality”

Send proposals to: gender.budgets@unwomen.org by 31 October 2012

Contact Information

 

  1. a.  Organization contact

 

Organization name* Municipal Development Counselling Group
Organization

Acronym

MUDEC Group
Address Molyko, Buea
City, State or

Province

South West Region

Postal

Code

NA
Country Cameroon

Website

www.mudecgroup.org
Telephone number (237) 75 13 29 70 / 77 64 94 30 / 94 34 43 52

Fax number

NA
*Name of the applicant organization. In case there is more than one organization applying, only include the name of the organization that will be responsible for project management and contractual obligations. There will be an opportunity to list names of co-applicants alter.

 

b. Head of Organization/Primary contact                                       c. Secondary contact person

person

Title         Mrs.      Title                    Mrs.                  
First Name Nancy First Name Florence
Last Name Ngalame Last Name Ewange
Telephone

number

(237) 75 13 29 70 Telephone

Number

(237) 79 70 61 37
Fax number NA Fax number NA
E-mail mudecgroupbuea@gmail.com E-mail mudecgroupbuea@gmail.com
                 

 

 

 

Skype (if applicable)

NA

Skype (if applicable)

NA

Address

 

Same as above

 

Address Same as above

 

2.  Organization Information

 

a. Type of organization (select one)
      Women led NGO  (selected)
b. Level at which the organization operates (select all that apply)
Community-based/grassroots        

 Sub-national (i.e. province, Region                                                                         

Local                                                                                                    

c. Year the organization was established. 14th February 2002
 
d. Mission Statement of Organization Reducing Poverty in our Municipalities through encouraging Gender Equality and increasing Citizen (End User) Participation in Democratic and Governance Processes.
e. Annual Organization Budget 2008

US $ 60.000

2009

US $ 75.000

2010

US $ 120.000

f. Primary Sources of Funding Service Provision through consultancy to national as well as international partners
g. Does the organization have a bank

account?

Yes      
                 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. 1.      Context / Problem Analysis: The population of Cameroon in 2010 is estimated at about 18.2 million inhabitants with an annual average growth rate of 2.3%. Women and girls represent close to 52% of the population which is relatively young, with 44% aged under 15 (TBS2, 2010) and more than 55.7% aged under 25 (EDS-III, 2010). Older people (65 years and above), who constitute more than 60% of the ruling class represent only 3% of the population (EESI, 2010). In spite of the achievements and efforts recorded in the last few years, the indicator levels for human and monetary poverty remain worrying and show huge disparities between the sexes. The rate of unemployment according to the ILO stood at 34.4% as registered in 2010 (34.2% unemployment for men and 54.6% for women). Underemployment (estimated at more than 75%, with 87% in the informal agricultural sector and 65% in the non–agricultural urban sector) remains a scourge. Underemployment rate is 68.3% for men and 83.6% for women in active service. On average, women earn half of what men earn in the informal sector. Disparities still exist and are maintained between men and women in areas such as health, education, access to certain resources and political participation. The low level of education of women and the negative influence of some socio–cultural factors limit their participation in national economic and political life. The economic evolution of the country has increased disparities between social and family groups by reinforcing the degree of precariousness of certain vulnerable social groups. Cameroon is a signatory to several international conventions including the Convention for the Elimination of all forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), the Maputo Protocol and the Millennium Development Goals (especially to promote gender equality and empower women) which were localized in 2003 through the elaboration of the Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP) and the 22nd of July 2004 Law on Decentralization which mandates local councils to alleviate poverty through the provision of basic services in the domains of education, healthcare, local economic development, culture, sports and leisure. Gender considerations are not highlighted in both the PRSP and the 2004 Law on Decentralization. The Cameroon Vision 2035 is to make Cameroon an emerging country unified in its diversity with the objective of attaining an economic growth of at least 10% per annum. To achieve its vision, the government has engaged in so many reforms including more stringent management of public finances, decentralization at regional and local levels, results based management, public service and governance reforms and the fight against corruption. This vision cannot be attained without the effective mainstreaming of gender. It is within this framework that the government requested and obtained technical assistance to mainstream gender in the revised PRSP.  The Ministry of Territorial Administration and Decentralization (MINATD) requested and received an increase in its budget to enable the transfer of funds to local councils. This means that councils will be able to experiment with a range of participatory strategies on the delivery of basic services to their population.

Considering government’s determination to advance with the decentralization process in 2010, the law that transfers certain government obligations, competences and resources to councils did not take into consideration gender equality within the decentralization process. The main obstacle government has is the insufficient knowledge and capacities to implement Gender Responsive Budgeting (GRB) at the local level, which this advocacy campaign wishes to implement. The difficulties of taking gender into account at the level of the budget are especially linked to the management of cross-cutting issues. Gender is not integrated into fiscal and monetary policies. The respective contributions from women and men are not understood as such in the planning and budgetary processes. The fiscal and economic contributions of women are not all considered into national income accounts. The indicators used are macroeconomic and quantitative and do not integrate the qualitative aspects, which would more likely bring out the inequalities and the actual contributions of women and men to the economy of the country.

Track I Project to Advocate to Institutionalize GRB in Local Councils in the South West Region was executed in 2010 and 2011 within the framework of the Coalition for More Open Democratic Societies in the South West Region. Coalition members for this project included MUDEC Group which has expertise in participatory processes in local governance, YADD which has experience in mobilization and organization of youth and women groups. The project was sponsored by the European Union (PASOC) and implemented in 6 pilot councils in partnership with women focal groups. The main objective was to stimulate the debate on GRB with an expected result of causing municipal councilors to deliberate and adopt Municipal Orders bearing on engendering the budgets of councils.  Track I project witnessed activities geared at sensitization as well as advocacy campaigns which targeted local decision makers including Supervisory Authorities of councils, locally elected officials (Mayors and Councilors) and senior council staff (Secretaries General and Municipal Treasurers) who are responsible for drafting and implementing the council budget.

Track II Project on GRB represents an opportunity for an action plan to be supported that will among others evaluate the functioning of gender equality accountability mechanisms that were put in place during the execution of the Track I project. Track II project seeks to address economic discriminations that women and youth encounter by introducing, sensitizing and advocating for output based budgeting within the nomenclature of council finances. It is centered on promoting GRB (results based) for gender equitable local development (MDG no. 3).

This project will enable local councils to have the technical capacity to integrate gender aggregated information into planning, budgeting and monitoring instruments. This will ensure that outputs and results are easily determined and measured. Council plans and policies will take into account the voices and situations of the majority of our population (women and youth) and adequately allocate funds to satisfy them thereby effectively reducing poverty. This Track II Project objectives share the ideals of the UN Women.

 

 

 

 

  1. 2.      Project Design / Justification:

This project is designed as a follow up of a previous project which resulted in Municipal Decisions on GRB in councils. It is designed to push the gender agenda into higher heights by advocating for results or output based budgets.

Project Objective (impact):

  • To improve the technical capacities of local councils to integrate output or results indicators into planning and budgeting.
  • To strengthen the capacities of women groups to monitor and enforce Output Based Budgets (OBB) in councils.
  • To develop a data base on the amount of council funding for gender equality related programs and the shortfall in funding to address the gender gaps and needs.

Project Activities: These will be jointly executed by 18 organizations all of which are headed by females.

a)      Conduct study of 6 pilot councils that were committed to GRB in 2011within the framework of the European Union funded PASOC Project. 2 research assistants on field visits will spend 2 days in each pilot council including Buea, Nguti, Ekondo Titi, Menji, Tinto and kumba I. They will use data gathering tools including questionnaires and focus group discussions to collect information (from mayors, secretaries general, treasurers and beneficiary populations) that will enable us to assess the implementation rate of the municipal decisions on GRB, the functioning of 6 focal points (organizations) that were constituted for proximity follow up as well as identify gaps, challenges and lessons learned which will be presented during the OBB workshop in activity 2.

b)     Organize a 3 day workshop and on Gender Responsive Budget Frameworks and Performance Measurement (OBB / RBB) involving 32 participants who will be council staff and women group representatives. Workshop contents shall include restitution of studies and validation of lessons learnt from activity 1 above, elaboration and validation of OBB / RBB Approach and municipal action plans for implementation during 2013 and 2014. This is an innovation because it will bring together council authorities and beneficiary groups in a unique forum and equip them with the necessary skills to maintain steady and measurable progress toward gender mainstreaming. They will jointly brainstorm on the needs and the strategies which should be put in place in the action plans.

c)      Support Popular Gender Audits in 16 councils (10 new ones as well as the 6 pilot). Women groups will be supplied with t-shirts, placards, banners, posters and fliers carrying gender sensitive information with focus on output or results based budget indicators. 100 women in each of the 16 councils will be transported to their council premises in order to conduct public manifestations during regularly scheduled council sessions to advocate and lobby municipal councilors to deliberate and adopt municipal decisions on RBB / OBB in their councils.

d)     Lobby the United Cities and Councils in Cameroon (UCCC) South West Region (SWR) to commit on a Gender Policy. This advocacy and lobbying activity will be held during the annual general assembly of all 33 councils in the region which will be attended by 10 gender activists with well defined terms of references. A draft generic gender policy document will be circulated (in advance) to all councils to enable adaptability to local realities by each member council. The UCCC/SWR (especially through its female and youthful members) will be urged to use their influence and internal communication mechanisms to foster gender mainstreaming within the region. This strategy is a novelty because it will intensify pressure on mayors to collectively undertake region wide commitments on a gender policy.

e)      Institute a Communication Plan for project visibility. All activities executed during the course of the project will be documented into reports and circulated to all stakeholders. An interactive website will carry all project activities such that researchers, students and development actors will have ready access. Furthermore,  a media blitz will be engaged to inform and educate the population using radio news programs and announcements, newspaper coverage and television prime time slots.

 

 

  1. 3.      Expected Results / Outcomes:

v  The technical capacity of 16 councils to integrate results and outputs into planning and budgeting improved by October 2013.

v  33 councils in the South West Region elaborate, deliberate and adopt Municipal Decisions bearing on Gender Policies within their municipalities by October 2013.

v  The abilities of women groups to monitor and enforce OBB in 16 councils increased by April 2013.

v  Information on council funding for gender equality programs is available and regularly updated by July 2013.

 

 

 

 

  1. 4.      Partnerships: Memorandum of Understanding /  Roles

A Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) will serve as the working document for a joint realization of Track II Project to Institutionalize Gender Responsive Budgeting in Councils of the South West Region of Cameroon with sponsorship from the UN Women. The project shall be jointly executed by 18 civil society organizations including Youth Alliance for Democracy and Development (YADD), Ekondo Women Foundation for Change (EWOFOC), Kumba Association Women Groups (KAWG), Menji Women Foundation for Change (MWOFOC), Nguti Women Foundation for Change (NWOFOC) Tinto Women Foundation for Change (TWOFOC) and Buea Women Forum.

Articles:

1)      That MUDEC Group and YADD including 6 resident Focal Organizations which are mostly women foundations for change (EWOFOC, KAWG, MWOFOC, NWOFOC, TWOFOC and Women Forum) in the pilot councils and 10 more women foundation for change which will initiated during the OBB workshop shall jointly execute the UN Women funded Track II Project to Institutionalize GRB in Councils of the South West Region of Cameroon.

2)      That the project duration shall be from January to November 2013.

3)      That a Project Committee comprising one representative from each organization above shall coordinate/monitor project activities (chaired by MUDEC and YADD as secretary).

4)      That funds will be requisitioned and disbursed based on agreed upon action plans within a finance management and control system.

5)      That the Project Committee shall hold quarterly review meetings including monthly joint monitoring field visits with competent resource persons.

6)      That the project shall operate a bank account with 3 signatories from the partners.

7)      That MUDEC Group shall serve as liaison between the partners and the UN Women.

8) That given their competencies and related on-going activities, project work is subdivided as follows:

No Activity  Role / Responsible
1 Conduct study in 6 pilot councils to ascertain the level of execution of Track I Project on GRB (restitute & validate findings/ lessons learnt) All Partners
2 Organize workshop and  on Gender Responsive Budget Frameworks MUDEC Group / YADD
3 Facilitate creation of 10 new functional Focal Organizations YADD / NWOFOC / EWOFOC
4 Support Popular Gender Audits / Manifestations on mainstreaming OBB / RBB  in 16 councils All Partners
5 Lobby UCCC / SWR for Gender Policy in member councils All Partners
6 Execute Communication Plan for project visibility MUDEC Group / YADD
7 Monitor project activities All Partners
8 Hold quarterly coordination meetings All Partners
9 Conduct Project Audit (mid term and final) YADD
10 Write and submit activity & financial reports to partners and the UN Women MUDEC Group / YADD

 

 

  1. 5.      Monitoring & Evaluation:
  • A monitoring team from amongst partner staff shall engage in participatory follow up of project activities and hold monthly reviews of planned activities to ascertain the rate of realisation and propose actions  to address gaps through monthly reports.
  • The Project Committee shall hold quarterly review meetings.
  • A joint project account shall be operated with three signatories coming from different partners. Disbursement and expenditure procedures shall be specified in a finance order that will constitute the contents of the MOU.
  • An external auditor shall be hired by the project committee to carry out two audits (mid term and final).
  • An end of project evaluation will be conducted so as to enable project partners determine best practices, lessons learnt and identify lapses inorder to improve on future performances.

All project activities will be monitored for results / outputs by a team using the (model) tool below.

Strategic Action to be accomplished:
Date of Monitoring and Evaluation:                         Person(s) Monitoring:
Resources needed:
What was planned to be done Person Responsible What has been done What still has to be done When should it be completed What will be there to show that it has been done Comments

and reactions of

the M&E team

Activity 1            
Activity 2            
Activity 3            
Activity 4            
Activity 5            

Main duties of the M & E team:

  • Follow up work done by resource persons and person ranking as such.
  • Execute periodic supervision visits to ensure that effective work is being done.
  • Obtain funds through communication with the competent persons or structures
  • Evaluate and Update the weekly, monthly and quarterly action plans.
  • Work in close collaboration with project officials.
  • Produce weekly, monthly & quarterly reports to the project committee.
  • Search alternative sources of funding to assure project sustainability

 

 

5.1 Communication Plan for Visibility and Sustainability:

We will ensure sustainability of program gains in two major aspects. Technical sustainability will include the transfer of skills such that the elaboration of Annual Operational Plans for councils will be output based. Also, the training curriculum at the Local Government Training Center for senior staff who is charged with drawing council budgets will include modules on OBB to better prepare them with tools needed to integrate results in their planning and budgeting. Furthermore, the critical mass of resource persons and focal institutions that will have benefited directly or otherwise will protect gains from the project by incorporating gender results based analysis in their work. They will also ensure that periodic budget tracking activities including popular budget hearings are held.  We will also solicit, secure and put in place technical advice and support from the international community such as GIZ, SNV, and UNIFEM who share our aspirations and which are based in Cameroon. All information generated will be hosted on a project website to enable the momentum thus created to remain accessible to future scholars, researchers and activists.  

 Financial sustainability will amongst others center on gender inclusive local council budgets beginning 2014 that will include line items for training on gender mainstreaming as well as for activities that cater for the felt needs of women and the girl child (RBB). Candidates for the 2013 twin elections (tentatively scheduled for July, August) will be lobbied to take an engagement to vote RBB / OBB at council levels. We will also request financial assistance from western organizations that have expressed interest in this domain.

 

  1. 6.      Budget Proposal (exchange rate of 450FCFA = $1.00):
No Output Unit Measure Unit Cost (FCFA) Total Cost (FCFA)
1.0 Conduct study on the level of execution of GRB in 6 pilot councils ( restitute & validate findings/ lessons learnt)      
1.1 Develop Questionnaire / Checklists

120 sets

100

12.000

1.2 Honorarium for 2 Research Assistants x 6 councils

24 days

50.000

1.200.000

1.3 Transportation for 2 Research Assistants x 6 councils

12 trips

25.000

300.000

1.4 Reporting

10 copies

5.000

50.000

1.5 Sub total

 

 

1.562.000

2.0 Organize workshop and  on Gender Responsive Budget Frameworks and Performance Measurement

 

 

 

2.1 Training Materials (assorted)

lump sum

150.000

150.000

2.2 Facilitation (Preparation, training, reporting) 2 x 6 days

12 days

50.000

600.000

2.3 Participant packs

32

3000

96.000

2.4 Participants Lodging (4 days)

128 nights

10.000

1.280.000

2.5 Feeding :

 

 

 

2.5.1 Dinner for 4 days

128

2500

320.000

2.5.2 Lunch for 3day

96

3000

288.000

2.5.3 Breakfast for 3 days

96

1500

144.000

2.6 Hall Hire

3 days

50.000

150.000

2.7 Transport for participants (round trip)

32

25.000

800.000

2.8 Reporting

20

5.000

100.000

2.9 Sub total    

3.928.000

3.0 Support Focal CSO for mainstreaming OBB in councils      
3.1 Produce Banners

16

25.000

400.000

3.2 Produce T shirts

1600

1500

2.400.000

3.3 Produce Placards

800

500

400.000

3.4 Produce Posters

800

100

80.000

3.5 Produce Fliers

2500

50

125.000

3.6 Purchase Water

1600

500

800.000

3.7 Purchase First Aid Kits

16

10.000

160.000

3.8 Participants Transportation (round trip)

1600

1000

1.600.000

3.9 Sub total    

5.965.000

4.0 Lobby UCCC / SWR for Gender Policy in member councils during 2013 Annual General Assembly      
4.1 Conception of Draft Gender Policy

2 consultants

250.000

500.000

4.2 Production of Draft copies of Gender Policy

35

10.000

350.000

4.3 Transportation of Gender Policy activists

10

25.000

250.000

4.4 Sub total    

1.100.000

5.0 Communication Plan for project visibility      
5.1 Radio Programs (monthly)

11

50.000

550.000

5.2 News paper articles (twice monthly)

22

15.000

330.000

5.3 Television slots (monthly)

11

100.000

1.100.000

5.4 Website (web master fees / monthly)

11

50.000

550.000

5.5 Sub total

 

 

2.530.000

6.0 Project Audits (mid term and final)

2

500.000

1.000.000

6.1 Sub total

 

 

1.000.000

7.0 Total  Costs    

16.085.000

8.0 10% Administrative costs    

1.608.500

9.0 Total Project Costs    

17.693.500

 

At the current exchange rate of 450FCFA = $1.00, the budget stands at US $ 39.318 (thirty nine thousand three hundred and eighteen dollars).

 

 

  1. 7.      Work plan (Activity Log):

 

Activity                      Months    (January to December 2013)
Jan Feb March April May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov
Conduct study in 6 pilot councils to ascertain the level of execution of Track I Project on GRB.(restitute & validate findings/ lessons learnt) XX                    
Organize workshop and  on Gender Responsive Budget Frameworks   XX                  
Facilitate creation of 10 new functional Focal Organizations   XX                  
Support Popular Gender Audits / Manifestations on mainstreaming OBB / RBB  in 10 councils     XX XX XX XX XX XX      
Lobby UCCC / SWR for Gender Policy in member councils           XX XX XX      
Execute Communication Plan for project visibility XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX
Monitor project activities XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX
Hold quarterly coordination meetings XX     XX     XX     XX  
Conduct Project Audit (mid term and final)         XX           XX
Write / submit activity & financial reports to partners and the UN Women         XX           XX

 

Annexes (MUDEC Competencies in Gender Governance)  

Þ    Gender Audit of Local Councils in Cameroon in collaboration with the Local Government Training Center (CEFAM)

Þ    Gender Audit Results Sharing with  Partners ( SNV, GIZ, HELVETAS,CEFAM)

Þ    The Bell Newsletters (March & October) with Partners (GNGG, FIDA, HELPOUT & OSIWA)

 


Back to: