Municipal Development Counselling (MUDEC) Group .:: MUDEC GROUP ::.
  • Our Mission

    • Reducing poverty in our municipalities through encouraging gender equality and increasing citizen (End User) participation in democratic and governance processes.

UN Women GRB (workshop report)

Workshop Background:

The population of Cameroon in 2010 is estimated at about 18.2 million inhabitants with an annual average growth rate of 2.3%. Women and girls represent close to 52% of the population which is relatively young, with 44% aged under 15 (TBS2, 2010) and more than 55.7% aged under 25 (EDS-III, 2010). The government has localized international conventions that seek to promote gender equality and empower women through the elaboration of the Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP) and the 22nd of July 2004 Law on Decentralization which mandates local councils to alleviate poverty through the provision of basic services in the domains of education, healthcare, local economic development, culture, sports and leisure. Gender considerations are not highlighted in both the PRSP and the 2004 Law on Decentralization.

The Cameroon Vision 2035 is to make Cameroon an emerging country unified in its diversity with the objective of attaining an economic growth of at least 10% per annum. To achieve its vision, the government has engaged in so many reforms including more stringent management of public finances, decentralization at regional and local levels, results based management, public service and governance reforms and the fight against corruption. This vision cannot be attained without the effective mainstreaming of gender.

The main obstacle government has is the insufficient knowledge and capacities to implement Gender Responsive Budgeting (GRB) at the local level, which this workshop wishes to implement. The difficulties of taking gender into account at the level of the budget are especially linked to the management of cross-cutting issues. Gender is not integrated into fiscal and monetary policies. The respective contributions from women and men are not understood as such in the planning and budgetary processes. The fiscal and economic contributions of women are not all considered into national income accounts. The indicators used are macroeconomic and quantitative and do not integrate the qualitative aspects, which would more likely bring out the inequalities and the actual contributions of women and men to the economy of the country.

This workshop will enable local councils and women group representatives to have the technical capacity to integrate gender aggregated information into planning, budgeting and monitoring instruments. This will ensure that outputs and results are easily determined and measured. Council plans and policies will take into account the voices and situations of the majority of our population (women and youth) and adequately allocate funds to satisfy them thereby effectively reducing poverty.

 

Workshop Objectives:

  • Ø To improve the technical capacities of local councils to integrate results indicators into planning and budgeting.
  • Ø To strengthen the capacities of women groups to monitor and enforce Results Based Budgets (RBB) in councils.
  • Ø To develop a data base on the amount of council funding for gender equality related programs and the shortfall in funding to address the gender gaps and needs.

Workshop Expected Results:

v Local council authorities and women group representatives acquire basic skills in results based budgeting and take a commitment for inclusive representation during the entire budgetary process.

v Local council authorities and women group leaders jointly develop action plans which will constitute the basis for a working relationship within each municipality.

 

v Functional Women Foundations for inclusion in the budgetary process are activated in each participating councils

v A data base on the amount of council financing for gender equality is established and regularly updated.

 


Workshop Timetable:

Day 9am to 11am 11am to 11.30am 11.30am to 1pm 1pm to 2pm 2pm to 5.30pm 6pm to 9pm
10th April Accreditation / Opening/ Mission of the Council

(VA)

Coffee  Break Rational for Gender Based Budgeting in Local Councils (SA) Lunch Break Presentation of Findings on GRB in 06 Pilot councils (CM) Case Studies & Group work

(VA / SA / CM)

11th April Restitution of group work

(VA)

Coffee  Break GRB Frameworks …

(SA)

Lunch Break Performance Based Budgeting for local Councils using the Communal Development Plan Case Studies & Group work

 (VA / SA / CM)

12th April Integrating Performance Based Budgeting / Diagnosing / Monitoring Performance Indicators(SA) Coffee  Break Group exercises per council

(SA /CM)

Lunch Break Gender Action Plan per Council

(VA)

Workshop Evaluation & Closing

(CM)

SA is Susan Awasom; VA is Vincent Anu; and CM is Charlie Mbonteh.

Working Documents include Mayor’s Action 2013, Council Budget 2013, Administrative Accounts 2011 & 2012.

 


DAY 1

Opening ceremony

The workshop opening ceremony started with a prayer by Mme Manga Clara who called on God to see the participants through the seminar and equally asked for God’s blessings on the organisers of the workshop. This was followed by the singing of the national anthem. The Director of the Women’s Empowerment and family Centre Kumba while welcoming the participants to her premises, lauded the initiative of MEDUC to build capacity such sensitive gender issue. The organisers represented by Mbonteh Charlie in his brief speech, presented the background of the workshop. He indicated the necessity for council budgets to outline the possible gender impacts on the various segments of the society. On her part the Regional Delegate of Women’s Empowerment and Family pointed out that engendering the budgets of councils have the merits of an all-inclusive development with the effects of development being felt by all the segments of the society. The opening was concluded with a group picture and a coffee break.

The first facilitator started off by soliciting the expectations/worries of participants which were given as follows

  • Know about gender budgeting
    • How to quantity gender allocations
    • Develop a gender policy for the councils
    • To be equipped to influence council authorities to take gender into consideration.
    • How policy can enable a council achieve more development

 

 

 

Worries

–     Time constraints

–     Lodging

–     If this will not remain as good paper work with no concrete outcome

Commenting on the worries, the facilitator Mr Anu Vincent explained that as participants will all have manage our time together. It was also indicated that participants will be lodged. As to the third worry, the facilitator indicated that it remains for the SGs and the participants as a whole ensure that this exercise do not remain as paper work but yield concrete results in the different municipalities. For the expectations he assured participants that their expectations will be met. But indicated that capacities will be built so that at the levels of the councils they can develop their own gender policies

The following conditions for success were developed as follows

–     Phones on vibration

–     Respect time

–     One speaker at a time

–     Avoid repetition

–     Respect each other because nobody knows everything and everybody knows something.

This was followed by a presentation of the objectives of Module 1: Mission of Councils.

 

 

 

Participants brainstormed on the Questions: what functions are councils expected to perform? The following responses were gotten:

–     Provide basic amenities e.g. markets, water, roads, streets, sanitation

–     Get grassroots to understands issues of development

–     Take care of the underprivileged

–     Give scholarships/ holiday jobs

–     Educate the public on the functions, funding and expenditure of the councils.

The facilitator pointed out that the legislation may not have used the same words, but these responses give us an ideal of the missions of the councils in Cameroon (see presentation).

Participants than brainstormed on some activities that are carried out by the councils to implement these functions to include:

  •  Economic developments e.g. constructs markets, farm to markets roads, organise trade fairs. The facilitator noted that councils should not only carry out economic development to raise revenues but equally give to give economic opportunities to its population
  •  Rural and Urban development e.g., roads, water, electricity
  •  Social developments
  •  Sports and cultural development e.g. promotion of culture
  •  Educational developments
  •  Health development
  •  Environmental development
  •  Planning

The facilitator than gave background information on the communal development plan. This was than projected on power point indicating and explaining its main components (see presentation).

A participant asked if it is the duty of women to ask for these plans or that of the council to give these documents to its population. In response, the facilitator said it is two way things.

Another participant observed that difficulties in implementing communal development plan also stems from the fact that projected often are granted by the governments or the projects are approved and sent to different communities which often lead to duplication of facilities in some communities.

During discussion that followed these questions, it was resolve that a letter requesting copies of the Communal Development Plans to be made available to women groups  should be drafted with the aid of MUDEC by the Regional Delegate of Women Affairs & the Family ( MINPROFF) to the President of South West Mayors’ Conference.

A study of the pilot councils was engaged targeting Mayors, Female Deputy Mayors, Committee Chairpersons, and Councilors, Secretaries General, Female Municipal Treasurers, Female Development and Finance Agents, Finance Officers, Beneficiaries of Council Services and Council collaborators.

v Objectives :

i)                   To ascertain the degree of implementation of Municipal Decisions bearing on GRB in pilot councils.

ii)                To determine the challenges encountered by councils in engendering their budgets.

iii)              To propose solutions to identified gaps.

 

The study revealed startling findings including:

a)     What Council Authorities say that they do in terms of GRB is not what is practiced especially in the domains of the budget process and stakeholder consultations.

b)    Councils do not have Gender Disaggregated Data on planning, implementation, monitoring & evaluation of council activities. Basic Gender information is limited to support for Women Day, Labour Day, Youth Holiday Employment, scholarships activities.

c)     Council staff do not master the skills to engender the budget (the Mayor’s Action Plan is usually gender blind, female councillors do not raise gender issues during committee deliberations).

d)    Key collaborators / partners of the council (Ministry of Women Affairs & the Family (MINPROFF), Ministry of Planning & Regional Development (MINEPAT), Ministry of Social Affairs (MINAS), the National Community Driven Development Program (PNDP) do not insist on Gender Aggregation for council activities. They either lack the knowledge or do not possess the courage and the will. They might even be gender blind.

e)     Beneficiaries of council activities (men, women, youth, widows, persons living with disabilities) are either unaware or nonchalant on the need to track and insist on inclusive council activities.

Toward a Gender Policy in Local Councils?

v Proposed Suggestions :

1)    Create & Support Functional Women Foundations for Change toward the Council Budgetary Process in all municipalities within the region. These foundations will sustain the sensitization of the population and maintain regular advocacy for GRB in councils.

2)    Hold regular consultations (may be quarterly) between the Council Executive, the Secretaries General, the Municipal Treasurers, and executives of Women Foundation for Change. The objectives will centre on joint planning, review and evaluation of GRB in councils.

3)    Create & maintain a data base on Council Funding for Gender Equality in each council.

4)    Develop a Draft Gender Policy for Local Councils & submit to competent organizations such as UN Women, MINPROFF and others for deliberations and ultimate submission to the House of Senate for adoption.

MUDEC Group is poised to stimulate this process, the financial support from UN Women will go a long way to maintain this stimulus but all stakeholders in the business of local government in Cameroon must put hands on deck. This will be realized especially as we draw nearer toward the magic 2015 for the MDG no 3. Join us … will you?

 

 

The Mission of the Council

Background

The 18 January 1996 constitution of the Republic of Cameroon states in its Article 1 (2) that Cameroon shall be a decentralized unitary state. This decentralization is seen in the form of the state structure which has the central government and its various organs and at the level of local authorities – the Region and councils.

Councils are the lowest tier of government and are the closest to the citizens. The functioning of councils is spelt out in the following laws:

Law Nº 2004/017 of 22nd July 2004 on the Orientation of Decentralization.

Law Nº 2004/018 of 22nd July 2004 to Lay Down Rules Applicable to Councils.

Domain Activities                                                                                          
Economic Development
  • Development of local agricultural, pastoral, handicraft and fish farming activities
  • Development of local tourist attractions
  • Building, equipment, management and maintenance of markets, bus stations and and slaughter houses
  • Organisation of local trade fairs
  • Provision of support to income and job generating micro-projects
Environment and natural resource management Drinking water supply

Cleaning up of council streets, roads and public parks

Control of industrial waste

Reforestation and creation of council forests

Fighting insanitation, pollution and nuisances

Protection of water sources

Preparation of council environmental plans

Creation of recreation lawns and parks

Management of household waste

Planning, Rural Development, urban development, housing Developing and managing council investment plans, urban parks

Preparing land tenure plans, town planning documents

Preparing development plans, urban rehabilitation and land consolidation plans

Organising and managing urban transport

Issuing town planning certificates

Developing and servicing housing estates

Lighting public highways

The creation and the maintenance of unclassified rural roads

Construction, maintenance and management of ferries

Contributing to the electrification of areas inhabited by the poor

 

Give its opinion on regional development plans

 

Health and Population Civil status registration.

• Setting up, equipping, managing and maintaining council health centres

in keeping with the health map.

• Assisting health and social centres.

• Ensuring sanitary inspection in establishments that manufacture,

package, store and distribute food products as well as in plants that

treat solid and liquid waste produced by individuals or enterprises.

Social development Participating in the upkeep and management, where necessary, of social

Advancement and reintegration centres.

• Constructing, maintaining and managing public cemeteries.

• Organizing and coordinating relief operations for needy persons.

Education Setting up, managing, equipping, tending and maintaining

Council nursery and primary schools and pre-school establishments. Recruiting and managing back-up staff for the schools.

• Participating in the procurement of school supplies and

Equipment.

• Participating in the management and administration of State

high schools and colleges in the region through dialogue and

Consultation structures. Literacy education

• Executing plans to eradicate illiteracy, in conjunction with the

Regional administration.

• Participating in the setting up and management of educational

Infrastructure and equipment.

Technical and vocational training

• Preparing a local forward-looking plan for training and

Retraining.

• Drawing up a council plan for vocational integration and

Reintegration.

• Participating in the setting up, maintenance and management

of training centres.

Youth, Sports and Leisure Promoting and coordinating

Sports and youth activities.

• Supporting sports associations.

Constructing and managing

municipal stadium, sports

centres and courses,

swimming pools,

Playgrounds and arenas.

• Identifying and participating

in the equipment of sports

Associations.

• Participating in the

organization of

Competitions.

Culture • Organizing cultural weeks, traditional cultural events

and literary and artistic competitions at the local level.

Setting up at the local level, orchestras, traditional

opera ensembles, ballet groups and theatre troops.

• Setting up and managing socio-cultural centres and

public libraries.

• Providing support to cultural associations.

Development of national languages

• Participating in regional programmes for the

development of national languages.

• Participating in the setting up and maintenance of

infrastructure and Equipment.

In order for the council to accomplish this mission it needs to do proper planning. This is why the Government, through the National Community Driven Development Programme (PNDP) is supporting councils to draw up strategic development plans called Communal Development Plans (CDP).

The plan is a tool that guides the council in determining its priority actions to promote local development in the domains cited above. The plan includes a long term vision, objectives,

mid- term and annual action plans. It is drawn up by sectors which, taken globally, all fit within the overall mission of the council.

Below are some examples of sector plans taken from a communal development plan.

Sector: Basic Education:

Sector Vision: The quality of training in primary schools is raised leading to more than 90% success rate in final examinations

  Intervention logic Objectively verifiable indicators Sources of verification Assumptions
Overall Objective Attain universal primary education for all children of school going age
  • 100% of children above 5 in the municipality attend and complete primary education by 2018
School records; End of course examination records Adequate school infrastructure and equipment are available; Primary education is effectively free
Specific Objective 1 All children of school going age complete primary school
  • By 2018, 100% of all children should complete primary school
  • Performance at official end of primary course examinations is above 80% annually beginning 2015

 

School records;

Common Entrance & FSLC results;

Adequate school infrastructure and equipment are available; Primary education is effectively free

Each school has  a trained teacher per class

Result 1.1 Adequate didactic and learning materials are available
  • 100% of teachers have teachers’ and pupils’ copies of all official textbooks; 100% pupils have at least a copy each of the official core textbooks for English Language, French, Mathematics as from 2012
School inspection reports Government funding for primary schools is effectively available; Parents have the means to buy textbooks
Result 1.2 School infrastructure/equipment increased
  • 100% of primary schools have at least 6 standard classrooms by 2015
  • There is at least 1 standard latrine per school by 2012
  • At least 1 potable water source is available for pupils within each  school by 2015

 

School visits; Site visits Government, council funding and community support are effectively available

 

 

 

 

 

Activities Costing
Result 4.1 Result 4.2 Result  4.3 Designation         Amount
4.1.1. Lo4.1.1 lobby for the posting  of 54 trained teachers

 

4.1.

 

 

4.2.1. Provide didactic materials to all public primary schools GS Nzenchen, GBPS I and II, GPS Njeh, GS Ndungoh, GS Nkah, GS Nentse Essoh Attah, Atongeh, GS Quebeku GS Nsoko, 4.3.1 Construct 2 classrooms each in 10 schools Total Investment 50, 288,000
  4.2.3. Provision of portable water at G.S Nsoko, G.S Atoangeh, G.S Quibeku and G.S N jentse Essoh Attah 4.3.2. Provide 600 pupils’ desks in 10 schools Total Running 75, 432,000
    4.3.3. Provide 4 teachers’  table and chairs in 20 schools Unforeseen 50, 288,000
    4.3.4. Construct and equip Head Teachers office in 10 schools Total estimated 628, 600,000
    4.3.5. Construct and equip computer laboratories in GS Njeh, GBPS I and II, GS Chenfem, GS Nchembin GS Njentse Lebang, GPS I and II, GS Fonge, GS Mbeoh, GS Nsoko, GS Fossung, GS Njenacha, GS Nkah, GS Belluah.

 

   
    4.3.6. Provide 29 water points in 29 schools    
    4.3.7. Construct 25 Latrines in 25 schools    
    4.3.8. Construct 6 play grounds in Gs Nsoko, GS Essoh Attah, CS Foreke Down, GS Mbeoh, GS Fonge, GS Lekong Forkemh    

 

Midterm Expenditure Framework (2012 – 2014)

The activities identified above are further prioritised over a three year period.

Sector: Basic Education:

 

Activity 2012 2013 2014 Estimates Source of Funding
Lobby for posting of  54 trained teachers to primary schools ü ü ü    500,000 Council/PTA
Provide didactic materials to all public primary schools. ü ü ü    13,500,000 PIB/Council
Construction of 2 classrooms at G.S Effeih, Njenatah, Menkia, ü      46, 000,000 PNDP/ Council
Provide pupils’ desks in 6 schools (GBPS Nwametaw, GBPS Menky, GS Effeih, GS Kongho, Njenatah) ü ü ü    23,400,0000 PIB
Provide 29 water points in 29 schools in Alou ü ü ü 35, 000,000 PIB/Council
Construct latrines in 20 schools ü ü ü 150,000,000 PAEPA/council/PIB

 

PIB= Public Investment Budget

PTA=Parent Teacher Associations

PAEPA=Rural Water and Sanitation Project

 

 

 

 

Module II: Gender Responsive Budgetary Frameworks in Local Councils

She started her presentation by presenting the objectives of the module

Participants than brainstormed on what is gender budgeting. The following responses were given:

  •  Takes into consideration the specific needs of the different

components of the municipality

  •  Considers the Interest of men, women, children of the society
  •  Budgets that highlights the need of females categories of the  society

The facilitator than summarised the responses to defined gender budgeting as

  •  Expenditures and revenues to address gender equality
  •  Budgets items that reflect needs, priorities of disadvantaged gender
  •  GB reflects values, power relations, political priorities with differential impacts on women and men ( see presentation)

Participant again brainstorm on Why Gender Budgeting

  •  Eliminate inequalities
  •  Create enabling environment for both gender
  •  Have an impact on the society
  •  Ensure a more focused development
  •  Ensures that the needs and interest of men and women are considered

The facilitator than clarified and indicate that gender budgeting helps,

  •  To promote gender equality, empowers the marginalised etc

The facilitator than asked participants to brainstormed on the question:

 

Brainstorming exercise 1. Are budgets Gender Neutral?

Answers.

No, they are not Neutral. Yes, they are neutral.
No budgets are gender neutral.  Appears so at phase value, but in implementations these budgets are gender blind not neutral. Neutral but very insignificants.
  Neutrality depends on the politician ( political choice).

 

After clarifications on the above question (see presentation), the facilitator than pose the following questions to the participants. If we assume that a budget is gender blind? Than how do we render it gender sensitive or how do we measure the gender dimension of budgets? Participants brainstormed as follows:

  •  Imputations on Revenue and expenditures
    •  Examine the budgets to see if it addresses the needs of men and          women
    •  Does it address existing gender gaps
    •  Scrutinised actions plans for gender concerns

The facilitator than clarified that we can measure the gender dimension of a budget by carrying out a self-assessments, gender audit, a social gender audits, gender budgets audits, audit the processes, contents, identify existing gender gaps etc ( see presentation).

The third facilitator Mr Chalie Mbonteh presented findings from six pilots councils in the south west region on gender budgeting (see presentations).

Participants lamented on the difficulties in getting assess to council resources and wanted to know what they should do such instances. After heated discussions on these difficulties, it was clear that there is little or nothing to do, but to keep up pressing or get the population to vote such a mayor out of office.

A participant proposed that participants in features workshops should be trained on how to make use of the recently created administrative courts to solve some of issues raise.

Participants emphasis the need for a minimum qualification for being a councillor and a mayor.

Lunch break was 3:00pm.

The session resumed at 3:45pm. Participants were briefed on the TOR for group work , based on the gender audit table below.

Brainstorming exercise 2.

Table I: Gender Audit Matrix: Actors in the Budgetary Process:

Participants brainstormed on the phases and Actors in the budgetary process as follows;

Phases Actors Gender ratios
Preparation Mayor

SG, finance clerk (FC), Municipal Treasurer (MT), councillors, SDO

 
Implementation Mayor

SG, finance clerk (FC), Municipal Treasurer (MT), finance controllers, councillors SDO

 
Consolidation and evaluation Mayor

SG, finance clerk (FC), Municipal Treasurer (MT), finance controllers, councillors SDO, state control

 

 

 

                                                

     MOD.11I. Performance Based Budgeting in Local Councils.

Specific Objectives, Participants should;

  •  Distinguish between PBB & traditional line item budgeting.
  •  Identify budget programs in the CDP.

What is PBB?

PBB is a system of strategic planning, budgeting and evaluation of results

It constitutes a shift from line item budgets towards budgeting in broader categories such as programs.

PB emphasizes on output achieved, line-item budget on input (expenditures).

  • PBB hold agencies for what they achieve (output) while Line item budget hold for what they spend.
  • Legislator should decide on which approach to adopt.

How is PBB conceived?

  • Identification of priorities for structuring programs.
  • Define policy objectives.
  • Focus on activities and outputs (government’s services and products) and on outcomes (the intended effects of policy measures).
  • Multi-year results to enhance short and medium term performance measurement and planning.

Why PBB

–     Overcome shortcomings of traditional line item budgeting through increased transparency and identification of gender impacts.

–     provide  qualitative and quantitative information on citizen participation in budget decision making

–     promote accountability by drawing links between government budgeting intentions, the services provided and the impacts on society;

–     Assess progress towards the gender equality1commitments of governments.”

–     Enhances performance as efficiency and effectiveness1 get a central place in the discourse about public spending.

Brainstorming Exercise 3.            

In the construction of a pit toilet regarding the Hygiene and sanitation program of your council;

  • Distinguish between the two concepts, efficiency and effectiveness with regards to the execution of the gender budget.
  • Participants discussed the concept of efficiency and effectiveness in the allocation of such budget expense recourses in their respective municipalities.

 

                                                                     GOODLUCK

 

MOD III. Gender Responsive Budgetary Framework in Local Governments.

               Specific Objective.  Participants should;

  • Identify needs of men & women in their respective council budget Items.
  •  Assess the gender dimension of their budget.

What is Gender Budgeting?

  •  Expenditure and revenue that address gender inequality by identifying its impacts on women and girls/ men and boys.
  • Budget items reflect that the needs, interest and priorities of the disadvantaged gender (or social categories, boys/girls, men/women).
  • GB reflects values, power relations and political priorities, as it has differential impacts on women and men.

Budgets appears to be Gender neutral,  Why ? They

  • Are formulated on aggregates amounts and items , not people.
  •  Ignore the different social roles, responsibilities and capacities of women and men.  (Who contributes and enjoys what?)
  •  Have the Same effect on everyone to serve the “public interest” and needs of all person.

This is not true, Budgets are not Neutral because they;

  •  Impact, create inequality, imbalance on social-economic political power relationship.
  •  reflect values, power relations and political priorities, differentiated impacts on women and men
  •  No budget is gender neutral, if a budget is not gender focused then it is gender blind.

Why gender Budgets.

  • To promote gender equality, empower the marginalized, raise the social and economic status of women and men.
  • To enhance participation, democracy and good governance, as budget policies articulate the voice and concerns of women and men.

How do we measure gender dimension of a budget. (Gender audit)     

  • Self-assessment, identifying perceptions on how gender issues are addressed in internal organization and programming of activities.
  • Examine if activities in system address gender equality and empowerment.
  • Gender social audit or gender budget audit.
  • Report and do an Gender Action Plan to mainstream gender in its making.
    • Gender Budget Audit. 
    • Evaluating the achievement of gender equality in the budgetary process and content.
    •  Content focus on amounts and patterns of  expenditure and revenue which promote gender equality .
    •   Process level focus on transparency and participation as entry points for influencing budget priorities, at each stage of intervention.

Group/Workshop Exercise 1.

 From the council organigram of roles and responsibilities, identify the main actors in the budget process of your respective councils, and complete the gender audit Metric table 1.

The participants were required to assemble themselves into five working groups following their council areas.

In each group, they identified the number of actors at each budgetary phase,

  • establish a gender ratio ( number of men : women) at each stage in the policy formation and execution  of their council  Budget.
  •  assess the extent to which the gender gab is bridged at each stage of budget by acknowledging if equality is obtained, or if a disadvantage gender is empowered.

The responses obtained were presented in Plenary as follows;

 

Group One: Mundemba Council.

Group Members:  Kundu Johnson, Marion Nganda, Ngalame Doris, Suilibayu William

Phases Actors Gender ratios Outcomes/results
    Men  Women     Equality  empowerment
Preparation Mayor

SG,

finance clerk (FC),

Municipal Treasurer (MT),

councillors,

SDO

Sub Total 1

Percentage

0

1

 

 

 

20

1

———

22

81.5

1

 

1

 

1

3- 1= 2 *

 

————-

5

18.5

Inequality  X
Implementation Mayor

SG,

finance clerk (FC), Municipal Treasurer (MT),

councillors

SDO

Sub Total 2

 

0

1

 

 

 

20

1

———

22

81.5%

1

 

1

 

1

3- 1= 2 *

 

————-

5

18.5

   
Consolidation and evaluation Mayor

SG,

finance clerk (FC), Municipal Treasurer (MT),

councillors

SDO

state control

Sub Total 3

0

1

 

 

 

20

1

1

———

23

82.1%

1

 

1

 

1

3- 1= 2 *

 

1

————-

5

17.9

   
Grand TOTAL

Percentage

67

81.7%

15

18.3%

   
  • *the mayor is also a councillor.

Gender audit result is that the number of women participation in the budget process is only 15 out of 82 council officials concerned in the policy making and execution of budget. Gender ratio therefore stands at 18.3% only.  There is gross gender inequality though one empowerment of a female as mayor with decision making power.

Group Two: Mamfe Council.

Group Members: Ayichap Esther, Mokambi Njilla Emmanuel, Takang Ernestine, Ayuk Grace.

Phases Actors Gender ratios   Outcomes/results      
    Men  Women     Equality  empowerment
Preparation Mayor

SG,

Municipal Treasurer (MT),

councillors,

SDO

 

Sub Total 1/

Percentage

1

 

 

1

20

1

———

23

79.3%

 

1

 

 

5

 

______

06

20.7%

Inequality

Inequality

 

Inequality

Inequality

Inequality

Inequality

 

 

x

Implementation Mayor

SG, finance clerk (FC), Municipal Treasurer (MT), finance controllers, councillors

SDO

 

Sub Total 2/

Percentage

1

 

 

1

 

20

1

———

23

79.3%

 

1

 

 

5

 

———–

06

20.7%

 

 

Inequality

Inequality

 

Inequality

Inequality

Inequality

Inequality

 

 
Consolidation and evaluation Mayor

SG,

Municipal Treasurer (MT),

Councillors

SDO,

state control

 

Sub Total 3

Percentage

1

 

 

1

20

1

1

———

24

80%

 

1

 

 

5

 

 

______

06

20%

Inequality

Inequality

 

Inequality

Inequality

Inequality

Inequality

 

 
                                    Grand total

                                     Percentage

70

79.5%

18

20.5%

   

Gender audit result is that number of women participation in budget process is only 18 out of 88 council officials concerned in the policy making and execution of budget. Gender ratio therefore stands at 20% .  There is gross gender inequality throughout the budget process, no female official is  empowerment, they all occupy positions that can easily have a direct impact on decision/policy making.

 

Group Three: Kumba I Council

Group Members: Manga Clara, Nkeme Enjema, Owasu Mariner Mukwelle,  Ntungwe Pamala Ngoh

Phases Actors Gender ratios Outcomes/results

 

    Men  Women     Equality  empowerment
Preparation Mayor

SG,

finance clerk (FC), Municipal Treasurer (MT),

councillors,

Finance Control

SDO

 

Sub Total 1 Percentage

1

 

1

 

 

21

1

1

_____

25

80.6%

 

1

 

 

1

4

 

 

______

06

19.4%

Inequality

Inequality

Inequality

 

Inequality

Inequality

Inequality

Inequality

 

X

 

X

Implementation Mayor

SG,

finance clerk (FC), Municipal Treasurer (MT),

Councillors

Finance controller

SDO

Civil society

Sub Total 2

Percentage

1

 

1

 

1

21

1

1

1

26

74.3%

 

 

 

1

 

 

1

4

 

 

3

9

25.7%

Inequality

Inequality

Inequality

 

Inequality

Inequality

Inequality

Inequality

Inequality

 
Consolidation and evaluation Mayor

SG,

finance clerk (FC), Municipal Treasurer (MT),

Councillors

Finance controller

SDO,

civil society

 

Sub Total 3

Percentages

1

 

1

 

1

21

1

1

1

 

28

73.7%

 

1

1

 

1

4

 

 

3

————-

10

26.3%

Inequality

Inequality

Inequality

Inequality

Inequality

Inequality

Inequality

Inequality Inequality

 

 
                                           Grand Total

                                            Percentage

79

75.96%

25

24.03%

   

 

Gender audit result is that number of women participation in budget process is only 25 out of 104 council officials concerned in the policy making and execution of budget. Gender ratio therefore stands at 24.03% .  There is  gender inequality throughout the budget process, however some  major  empowerment females as SG and MT, they on decision/policy making positions.

 

Group Four:  Tiko Councils

Group Members: Tembong Ernestine, Anne Munjong, Ebwea Florence, Chief Nkamteba Joseph,Thecla Emehkeng.

Phases Actors Gender ratios             Outcomes/results
    Men  Women     Equality  empowerment
Preparation Mayor

SG,

finance clerk (FC), Municipal Treasurer (MT),

Councillors,

SDO

Sub Total 1

Percentage

1

 

1

 

1

27

1

31

70.5%

 

1

 

 

 

12

 

13

29.5%

   

x

Implementation Mayor

SG,

finance clerk (FC), Municipal Treasurer (MT),

Councillors

SDO

Sub Total 2

Percentage

1

 

1

 

1

27

1

31

70.5%

 

1

 

 

 

12

 

13

29.5%

   
Consolidation and evaluation Mayor

SG,

finance clerk (FC), Municipal Treasurer (MT),

Councillors

SDO,

state control

Sub Total 3

Percentage

1

 

1

 

1

27

1

1

32

71.1%

 

1

 

 

 

12

 

 

13

28.9%

   
                                       Grand Total

                                            Percentage

94

70.7%

 

39

29.3%

   

 

Gender audit result is that number of women participation in budget process is only 39 out of 133 council officials concerned in the policy making and execution of budget. Gender ratio therefore stands at 29.3%. There is gender inequality , one female official  empowerment as SG..

 

Group Five : Kumba 11 Council

Group Members: Bende Valentine , Sona Julius, Eyame Margaret, Eta Dorothy

Phases Actors Gender ratios Outcomes/results
    Men  Women     Equality  empowerment
Preparation Mayor

SG,

Municipal Treasurer (MT),

councillors,

SDO

 

Sub Total 1

Percentage

1

1

 

 

18

1

21

72.4%

 

 

 

1

7

 

8

27.6

   
Implementation Mayor

SG,

Municipal Treasurer (MT),

councillors

SDO

Sub Total 2

Percentage

 

1

1

 

 

18

1

21

72.4%

 

 

 

1

7

 

8

27.6

   
Consolidation and evaluation Mayor

SG,

Municipal Treasurer (MT),

Councillors

SDO,

state control

Sub Total 1

Percentage

1

1

 

 

18

1

 

21

72.4%

 

 

 

1

7

 

 

8

27.6

   
                                      Grand Total

                                       Percentage

63

72.4%

 

24

27.6

 

   

 

Gender audit result is that number of women participation in budget process is only 24 out of 87 council officials concerned in the policy making and execution of budget. Gender ratio therefore stands at 27.6% .  There is gender inequality throughout the budget process, one female official is empowerment, as MT.

Conclusion on council gender audit plenary presentation.   Ranking of the 5 councils’ gender budget process audit obtains the following results;

 

1st   Tiko Council  29. 3% female participation, one female empowered SG.

2nd Kumba 2.Council 27.6% female participation. One female empowered Mt.

3rd Kumba 3, 24.3%, female participation, two females empowered, MT, SG.

4th Mamfe, 20% female participation , one female empowered with direct decision making position.

5th Mundemba, 18% female participation. The only female most empowered council but ironically last on the ranks of gender audit of budget process.

In a nutshell there is a gross gender inequality through out the budgetary processes in all the councils. But for Tiko  which is near to obtaining the MDG gender equality thresh whole of 30%.

On the basis of this analysis, council should set a gender policy on what minimum thresh whole to obtain in their budgetary/policy processes and development planning.

Mod. IV. Integrating Gender Budgeting and Performance-Based Budgeting .

               Specific Objective.  Participant should;

  • Identify the link between PBB & GRB.

What is the Nexus; PBB & GRB?

  • GRB and PBB are conceptual tools to ensure budget transparency, accountability and participation; all citizens have equal voice.
  •  logical link between PBB and Gender Budgeting as both focus on ;
  • Ø Results and a broader cycle of policy planning, implementation and evaluation.
  • Impact of budget on citizens, their welfare as the central issue of concern, people oriented.

 

 

How can Performance-Based Budgeting approaches foster the objectives Gender Budgeting?

  • Consider which aspects of both concepts to adapt such that their aims and objectives are preserved.
  • Extrapolate a few central elements of PBB and subsequently show how PBB can be linked with Gender Budgeting approaches.

Limitations and weaknesses of performance-based approaches for Gender Budgeting

  • failure to include measures and indicators of the gender impacts of budgets and policies
  • increased complexity that requires considerable capacity and time investment;
  • present budget decision as fundamentally a technocratic process rather than inherently a political process;
  • essential information such as that in budget papers or evaluation reports not readily being usable by the public and not widely distributed;

Limitations and weaknesses of performance-based approaches for Gender Budgeting

  •  intended and actual dimensions of the budget – inputs, outputs, outcomes  in practice often not coming together at any single point, for example, in the budget papers;
  •  lack of provision of adequate measures that capture the quantity and quality of care activities and services;
  •  Misleading efficiency and effectiveness measures of performance.

 

 

 

 

                     

               

Module III: Performance Based Budgeting in Councils

The objectives were presented and the facilitator noted the fact that a performance based budget can equally bé engendered (see presentation).

After this presentation participants were divided into groups of four participants grouping representatives of two councils to brainstorm on budgets given to them to see if the budget is gender sensitive

 

DAY 2

Day 2 started with a quick review of the previous day. Participants highlighted the following take home points

  •  Incorporate learning on gender in women’s forum agenda to improve collaboration with the council
    •  Disseminate information on communal plans to the public
    •  Gender audit of some councils budgets revealed a huge gender gap in desire gender ratios.
    •  Gender sensitive budgeting must bé inclusive and the targets disaggregated by gender

The facilitator wanted to know if there is anything that could have improved upon based on the modules of yesterday. The following responses were gotten

  •  Respect time
  •  Participants soul avoid side talks during sessions and presentations

The following proposals were also made based on some of the issues raise yesterday:

  •  Councils soul Communicate with the public
    •  Need to organised refresher courses for council workers from time to time
    •  Secretary Generals should be involved more in councils running

 

After the review by Mr Anu, the first presentation was on Performance Assessment. Participants brainstormed on the meaning of performance assessments. The following responses were given

  •  Output, result, outcomes
  •  How much has been done and what is left to bé done
  •  How much and how well

The facilitator than did a power point presentation on performance assessments (see presentation)

This was followed by a presentation on Integrating Gender Budgeting and Performance–Based Budgeting by SA (see presentation)

After the presentation participants were asked to used their various council budgets to do a content audits of their budgets and since these budgets were not available , they were to do this as a take home assignment.

Using the constituted groups of the previous day, participants in groups were asked to pick a program, develop an objective and necessary activity and the expected results as in exercise below;

Group/Workshop Exercise 2.

Question 3.  With inspiration from your Council Development Plans, CDP.

  • Identify 4 priority programs having gender implication (one program each council workshop group).
  • State the program objectives and expected result.
  • Complete the Gender Responsive Program Budget (GRPB) Table.

Workshop Plenary Restitution

Group One: Economic Development .

Group Members: Kundu Johnson, Marion Nganda, Ngalame Doris, Suilibayu William

Objective Specific Objectives Activities Indicators
Improve on the economy of the population Construction of a market
  • Procession of document
  • Acquisition of land
  • Advertised contracts for construction
  • Execution of work
  • Monitoring and evaluation
By December 2013, at least 50% of market women with shades in the market
Source of  Verification  Assumptions Indicators of Assumption Sources of Indicators
  • Documents
    • Land certificate
    • Contracts
    • Program of work
    • Monitoring
    • Evaluation report
Market completed
  • 50% of shade owners are women
Evaluation Report

 

 

Group 2 : Women’s Empowerments and promotion of the family .

 

Group Members: Ayichap Esther, Mokambi Njilla Emmanuel, Takang Ernestine, Ayuk Grace, Mbake Grace

Priority Budget Program Objectives Activities Indicators
Women’s Empowerments and promotion of the family To reduce social inequality for women
  • Sensitisation of women on their rights and the family in groups and associations
    • Organisation of trainings for women’s groups on their rights and political participation
    • Lobbying of political parties and authorities on quotas for women representation
    • Training of female candidates from different political parties
    • By the end of 2013, 55% of women soul enjoy their rights and assume their duties. This percentage soul rise to 65% of 2014, and to 75% of 2015
    • By the end of 2014, 45% of women soul participants in political parties. 2014- 55%, 2015- 60%
    • By the end of 2014, at least 35% of the positions in local decisions making structures are held by women.

 

Group 3: Case Study of Buea

Sector: Basic Education

Sector Vision: The quality of training in primary schools is raised leading to a more than 90% success rate in final examinations

Overall Objectives: promote the attainment of universal primary education for all children of school going age in the Buea Municipality

Activities  Specific objectives indicators Targets Results

N-I

Result N Budget line
Sensitisation of parents on the importance of basic education All children of school going age complete primary education By 2014, at least 70% of parents understands the importance of education Parents, guardian,

children

Increase enrolments of pupils mostly girls Increase in the number of children who have completed primary schools especially girls 650 – 100
Councils soul take the responsibility of establishing birth certificates   At least 80% of pupils have birth certificates to enable enrol in Schools

b y 2014

Council actors, parents,

Teachers, court officials

Increase in the number of children with birth certificate Awareness created in the population 650-

100

Provision of scholarships to meritorious / underprivileged pupils   At least 80% of meritorious and underprivileged benefitted   from scholarship by 2014 Meritorious and underprivileged children,

Teachers

council

Increase in literacy rates of underprivileged pupils Competition and hard work increased in the number of children entering secondary schools 650 –

100

 

Group Members: Enjema Nkene, Awasu Mariner. Emenkeng Thecla, Chief Nkemteba Joseph, Clara Manga, Ann Mujong, Tembong Ernestine,  Ntungwe Pamela, Anyichap Esther, Ebwen  Florence Besong

 

Group 4: Health. 

Group members: Njume Elizabeth, Fondem Maria, Sona Julius, Eyambe Margaret, Atem Sheilla

 

Sector Vision Objectives

 

Activities Indicators Cost in Million CFA
Improvement of the health condition for 5 million for 3years

Women – 40%

Youths – 45%

Men – 15%

Handicap – 4%

Increase access to health services
  • Construction of 3 health post

 

  • Recruitment of staffs

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Purchase of Equipment
    • 3 health posts constructed
    • A total of 18 persons recruited 12 women and 6 women
60

 

 

 

  • 20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • 20

 

Gender Action Plans per Council

Council Activity Responsible Deadline Resources
Bangem Secure a copy of report from MUDEC Group, Buea.

Ngalame Doris

 
Replicate workshops with women(at least 10women)

31st/05/13

 
Introduce FOCAL team to council authority.

10th/06/13

 
Sign a memorandum of understanding with council authority.

15th/06/13

 
Propose a timetable of meeting  with S.G’s, M.T’S and Mayors  

30th/06/13

 
Define the role of development agent, finance agent, finance    officer

25th/07/13

 
Develop a communication plan.

31st/07/13

 
Buea Secure a copy of report from MUDEC Group, Buea.

Clara Manga

10th/05/13

Replicate workshops with women( at least 10women)

Introduce FOCAL team to council authority.

Sign a memorandum of understanding with council authority.

Propose a timetable of meeting  with S.G’s, M.T’S and Mayors

Define the role of development agent, finance agent, finance    officer

Develop a communication plan.

Ekondo Titi Activity Person Responsible Deadline Resources

 

Secure a copy of report from MUDEC – Buea Njume Elizabeth June, 2013  
Restitution workshop findings to  a wilder group of women not less than 10 Njume Elizabeth June, 2013  
Introduce focal team to council authoritie Njume Elizabeth June, 2013  
Sign a memorandum of understanding with council authorities Njume Elizabeth June, 2013  
Propose a time table for SG, MT and Mayor Njume Elizabeth June, 2013  
Define the role of the development agent, finance agent, finance officer, and persons ranking as such Njume Elizabeth June, 2013  
Eyumojock Secure a copy of report from MUDEC      
Replicate workshop finding to a wider group of women but not more than 10      
Introduce focal team to council authorities      
Sign an M.O.U(memorandum of undeveloped standing with council authorities)      
Propose time table for meetings with Secretary generals, Municipal treasurers  and Mayors      
Define the role of D.A, F.A and F,O and persons ranking as such      
Developed a communication plan      
Kumba I &

Kumba II

Secure a copy of report from MUDEC Group, Buea.

Fondem Maria

30th/06/13

Replicate workshops with women(at least 10women)

Fossung Angeline

Introduce FOCAL team to council authority.

Sign a memorandum of understanding with council authority.

Propose a timetable of meeting  with S.G’s, M.T’S and Mayors

Define the role of development agent, finance agent, finance    officer

Develop a communication plan.

Limbe I & Limbe II Secure a copy of report from MUDEC  

17th/04/13

 
Replicate workshop finding to a wider group of women but not more than 10   21st/04/13  
Introduce focal team to council authorities  

28th/04/13

 
Sign an M.O.U(memorandum of undeveloped standing with council authorities)   1st/05/13  
Propose time table for meetings with Secretary generals, Municipal treasurers and Mayors    

8th/05/13

 
Define the role of D.A, F.A and F,O and persons ranking as such   16th/05/13  
Developed a communication plan   23th/05/13  
Mamfe Secure a copy of report from MUDEC Group, Buea.

Takang Ernestine

20th/04/13

Replicate workshops with women(at least 10women)

Ayichap Esther.  77863189

30th/05/13

Introduce FOCAL team to council authority.

June 2013

Sign a memorandum of understanding with council authority.

Propose a timetable of meeting  with S.G’s, M.T’S and Mayors

September 2013

Define the role of development agent, finance agent, finance    officer

October 2013

Develop a communication plan.

November 2013

Mbonge Secure a copy of report from MUDEC Group, Buea.

Ashu Magaret

20th/04/13

Replicate workshops with women(at least 10women)

30th/04/13

Introduce FOCAL team to council authority.

1st/05/13

Sign a memorandum of understanding with council authority.

15th/05/13

Propose a timetable of meeting  with S.G’s, M.T’S and Mayors

25th/05/13

Define the role of development agent, finance agent, finance    officer

30th/05/13

Develop a communication plan.

10th/06/13

Menji Secure a copy of report from MUDEC Group, Buea.

Chief Nkenteba Joseph

05/11/2013

Human financial material from MUDEC/ COUNCIL

Replicate workshops with women(at least 10women) Emenkeng Thecla

10th/05/13

Introduce FOCAL team to council authority.

05/11/2013

Sign a memorandum of understanding with council authority.

05/11/2013

Propose a timetable of meeting  with S.G’s, M.T’S and Mayors

05/11/2013

Define the role of development agent, finance agent, finance    officer

05/11/2013

Develop a communication plan.  

05/11/2013

Muyuka Secure a copy of report from MUDEC Mbake Grace

17th/04/13

 
Replicate workshop finding to a wider group of women but not more than 10   21st/04/13  
Introduce focal team to council authorities  

28th/04/13

 
Sign an M.O.U(memorandum of undeveloped standing with council authorities)   1st/05/13  
Propose time table for meetings with Secretary generals, Municipal treasurers and Mayors    

8th/05/13

 
Define the role of D.A, F.A and F,O and persons ranking as such   16th/05/13  
Developed a communication plan   23th/05/13  
Mundemba Secure a copy of report from MUDEC  

17th/04/13

 
Replicate workshop finding to a wider group of women but not more than 10   21st/04/13  
Introduce focal team to council authorities  

28th/04/13

 
Sign an M.O.U(memorandum of undeveloped standing with council authorities)   1st/05/13  
Propose time table for meetings with Secretary generals, Municipal treasurers and Mayors    

8th/05/13

 
Define the role of D.A, F.A and F,O and persons ranking as such   16th/05/13  
  Developed a communication plan   23th/05/13  
Nguti Secure a copy of report from MUDEC Group, Buea.

Ashu Magaret

20th/04/13

Replicate workshops with women(at least 10women)

30th/04/13

Introduce FOCAL team to council authority.

1st/05/13

Sign a memorandum of understanding with council authority.

15th/05/13

Propose a timetable of meeting  with S.G’s, M.T’S and Mayors

25th/05/13

Define the role of development agent, finance agent, finance    officer

30th/05/13

Develop a communication plan.

10th/06/13

Tiko Secure a copy of report from MUDEC Tembong Ernestine 15th/08/13  
Replicate workshop finding to a wider group of women but not more than 10      
Introduce focal team to council authorities      
Sign an M.O.U(memorandum of undeveloped standing with council authorities)      
Propose time table for meetings with Secretary generals, Municipal treasurers and Mayors      
Define the role of D.A, F.A and F,O and persons ranking as such      
Developed a communication plan      
Tinto Secure a copy of report from MUDEC Group, Buea.

Ayuk Grace

25th/04/13

Replicate workshops with women(at least 10women)

11th/05/13

Introduce FOCAL team to council authority.

15th/06/13

Sign a memorandum of understanding with council authority.

25th/06/13

Propose a timetable for S.G’s, M.T’s and mayors.

27th/06/13

Define the role of development agents, finance agents.

Develop a communication plan.

 

 

 

 

 

Workshop Evaluation

What went well?

  • Lectures were explicit and enriching
  • Condusive environnement for Learning
  • Participation was very good
  • Mastery of Modules by resource persons
  • Information well acquired to be put in practice in the field
  • Rich package, useful and timely
  • Facilitators master their subjects and gave brilliant presentations
  • Lunch was good
  • Good accommodation
  • Friendly environment.

What did not go well?

  • Time was short that is resource persons did not manage time during presentation
  • Noisy nature of some participants
  • Detail logistics not communicated before
  • Participants did not respect time
  • Late start of the workshop
  •  Too much random talking by participants
  • Day one breakfast was not good and not enough
  • More days should be set aside for the workshop
  • Workshop was not at the appropriate time
  • Answering of calls during lectures
  • Time was too short to look into practical problems per councils as concerns Gender
  • No introduction of participants made it difficult to interact

 

Suggestions

 

MUDEC should be able to form smaller focal points to enlighten the leaders and women

Leaders of the different councils areas should have a regional meeting to strengthen and exchange ideas

MUDEC should make their presence felt by all the councils as a legalised body

Regular workshop soul be organise

MUDEC should always follow up so that this gender policy on budgeting is follow up

Time should be respected and manage well

Other subsequent workshops should include Mayors that would go a long way to enhance collective and collaboration between the mayor and the main council

More women should be involve in such workshops

More journalist should be invited for better diffusion

All Divisional Delegate of MINPROFF should be involved as well as some from City Councils

Councils should learn to make their organisation a learning institution

Secretary generals or representatives should be part of the focal group at the level of the Municipality

Ensure better discipline dring workshop

 

Council follow-up Assignment on GRB & PBB.  ( Workshop follow up).

 From your traditional line item budget reflected in your council administrative account;

  • Identify 10 paragraphs (items) of GPN ( gender practical needs) in your community. Exploit both the investment (1&2) and operating (6&7) items of your budget. Complete  the Gender Audit Metric Table1.2.

Gender Audit Metric Table 2.

Priority Budget Items.

Estimates

Actual

%, Results 

quantity quality quantity quality  
Grants /Subvention          
Staff expense          
Rates and Taxes          
Water/electricity          

 

 

ANNEXTURES.

 

Performance Assessment.

By Anu Vincent.

We carry out performance assessment to measure what has changed positively as a result of doing a given set of activities over a certain period. In the case of gender based results assessment in our councils, this will be based on the activities retained in the action plan for the year, mid- term or long term basis.

A useful starting point for such assessment in the council will be the communal development plan. Objectives in the plan envisage changes on a long term basis.  Results in the plan are changes that should occur to lead to the long term change. Activities are the concrete things that are done to cause change. These are usually stated in the form of micro projects.

Taking the example of a communal plan below:

Sector: Women Empowerment and Promotion of the Family

Overall Objective: Reduce social inequality for women (60% of women in the municipality enjoy their rights and assume their duties).

The specific objective that will enable us to reach this target in the objective is stated as:

Specific Objective: Reinforce social cohesion through improved gender equity and equality (Number of women actively participating in political and economic activities increases by 40% by end of 2015).

To attain the target in the specific objective we must achieve results e.g. :

Result 1: Participation of women in decision making is increased. (By end of  2012  at least 30% of positions in local decision making structures (the Council, traditional councils, associations etc.) are held by women.

Several activities will have to be realized to obtain the result and its target:

1.1.1: Sensitisation of the population on women and family rights

1.1.2: Organisation of trainings for women’s groups on rights and political participation

1.1.3. Lobbying of political parties and authorities on quotas for women’s representation

1.1.4. Organisation of trainings for women candidates for political office

In order to assess the achievement of the objectives, results and activities stated here above, we have to put in place a monitoring and evaluation system.

Monitoring is a continuous function that uses the systematic collection of data on specified indicators to provide management and the main stakeholders of an ongoing development intervention with indications of the extent of progress and achievement of objectives and progress in the use of allocated funds.

Evaluation is the systematic and objective assessment of an ongoing or completed project, program, or policy, including its design, implementation, and results. The aim is to determine the relevance and fulfilment of objectives, development efficiency, effectiveness, impact, and sustainability.

Monitoring and evaluation are done using indicators.

An indicator is a standard of measure. It is stated in terms of:

  •  Quantity
  •  Quality
  •  Time

Location

 

Example from a Literacy Programme: 20% of previously illiterate women in Bwango are able to read and write simple sentences within 6 months of starting the programme .

An indicator should be objectively verifiable.

  •   It can be measured
  •   It is clear
  •   It is relevant
  •   It is independent of  other indicators
  •   It can be verified

For gender based performance measurement we have to ensure that:

  • Objectives, results, outputs (benefits from activities) are inclusive of desired gender targets.
  • Indicators can lead to a verification of positive changes in gender relations
  • Data  collected in the course of monitoring and evaluation is gender disaggregated

Finally it is important to always measure our performance because:

  •  If you do not measure results, you cannot tell success from failure.
  •  If you cannot see success, you cannot reward it.
  • If you cannot reward success, you are probably rewarding failure.
  • If you cannot see success, you cannot learn from it.
  • Ø If you cannot recognize failure, you cannot correct it.
  • If you can demonstrate results, you can win public support. (Source: Adapted from Osborne & Gaebler 1992).

APPLICATION EXERCISES ON GENDER RESPONSIVE AND PERFORMANCE BASED BUDGETING.

Questions. 1.

With inspiration from , Articles 4 and 5 on the  Law of the Orientation of Decentralization no 2004/17of 22nd July 2004, and Article 3(1) & (2) of 2004/18 on Councils;

  • State how the goals of RLA in Cameroon have gender implications.
  • Identify the institutions and their roles in promoting the implementation

 of Gender Mainstreaming in councils.

Question 2.  From the council organigram of roles and responsibilities, identify the main actors, and prepare the Gender Audit Metric table 1.

Question 3.  With inspiration from your Council Development Plans, CDP.

  • Identify 4 priority programs having gender implication (one program each council workshop group).
  • State the program objectives and expected result.
  • Complete the Gender Responsive Program Budget ( GRPB)Table.

Question 4.   From your traditional line item budget reflected in your council administrative account;

  • Identify 10 paragraphs (items) of GPN ( gender practical needs) in your community. Exploit both the investment (1&2) and operating (6&7) items of your budget.

Complete  the Gender Audit Metric Table1.2.   

 

Budget Phases.

 

 

Actors concerned. Gender Ratio Outcome/Result
  No. of Men No. of women Equality Empowerment
Preparation          
Implementation          
Consolidation & Control.          

 

Priority Budget Items.

Estimates

Actual

Results

quantity quality quantity quality  
Grants /Subvention          
Staff expense          
Rates and Taxes          
Water/electricity          

 

 

Gender Responsive Program Budget.

Priority Budget programs Objective Activities

Target

Years

2013 2024 2015
Health            
Education            
Women empowerment            
Hygiene and Sanitation            

 

 

 

 


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