Municipal Development Counselling (MUDEC) Group .:: MUDEC GROUP ::.
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    • Reducing poverty in our municipalities through encouraging gender equality and increasing citizen (End User) participation in democratic and governance processes.

Final Report Finding on Gender Responsive Budgeting(GRB)

 

REPORT ON GENDER RESPONSIVE BUDGETING (GRB) STUDY CONDUCTED IN 06 PILOT COUNCILS WITHIN THE

SOUTH WEST REGION.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Presented to: MUDEC Group, Buea.

Presented by CEMUS Consultants.

Presented on: 18th June 2014.

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS:

Title Page Number
Executive Summary  
Introduction / Justification  
Objectives  
Scope  
Findings / Analysis per Council  
Challenges encountered  
Recommendations  

 

List of Abbreviations

No Abbreviation Full Meaning
  CEMUS Center for Municipal Studies
  CDP Communal Development Plan
  GRB Gender Responsive Budgeting
  MINADER Ministry of Agriculture & Rural Development
  MINAS Ministry of Social Affairs
  MINEPAT Ministry of  Economy  & Regional Planning
  MINPROFF Ministry of Women Affairs & the Family
  MITEF Mid Term Expenditure Framework
  MUDEC Municipal Development Counselling Group
  NSA Non State Actors
  PASC / EU Civil Society Strengthening Program / European Union
  PGA Popular Gender Audit
  WOFIG Women Foundation for Inclusive Governance

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. I.                Executive Summary:

The Gender Responsive Budgeting (GRB) study of six (06) pilot councils in the South West Region was commissioned by MUDEC group within the framework of a collaborative agreement with the European Union Civil Society Strengthening Program (PASC). The study was carried out as a follow up to a previous project which had an expected result to cause the six pilot councils to adopt municipal decisions bearing on Gender Responsive Budgeting (GRB). The objective of this study was to find out the level of implementation of the municipal decisions.

The consultants of the Center for Municipal Studies (CEMUS) organized preparatory meetings to develop data collection tools including questionnaires and checklists. Phone calls were made to engage the authorities of the respective councils for effective field visits. During field visits, more than one thousand persons were contacted either individually or in groups. They included local authorities, council staff, and beneficiaries of council services including non state actors, council collaborators, traditional and religious authorities and scholars of local government.

The findings from those contacted were as diverse as the individuals themselves. From total lack of knowledge on the function of the local council to nonchalance and laissez faire attitudes of persons for whom the councils are created to serve. From the findings it is obvious that both male and female decision makers are gender blind in the distribution of council services. While some of the councils had several females employed in strategic positions there was the absence of a commitment from council authorities to enforce gender disaggregation in terms of beneficiaries to council services.

During restitution meetings held in each council area and with the students of the University of Buea Departments of Women & Gender Studies, Anthropology, Sociology and Accounting, practical local solutions were proposed including the creation and support of functional Women Foundations for Inclusive Governance (WOFIG) and a Gender Committee in each council area. These gender platforms will ensure that the agenda for increasing financing for gender equality is put sustainably put on the decision making tables of local councils. These gender platforms are currently being put in place in councils in the region including Bangem, Nguti, Ekondo Titi, Tombel and Mbonge.

It is highly expected that the gains from the conduct of this study will usher a new wave of thinking and advocacy toward correcting the historical gaps created by male domination in society.

  1. II.                  Background to the Study:

In 2010, MUDEC received funding to facilitate an initiative of Increasing Accountability in Financing for Gender Equality in Local Councils of the South West Region of Cameroon. A study of 6 pilot councils (Buea for Fako, Ekondo Titi for Ndian, Kumba I for Meme, Menji for Lebialem, Nguti for Kupe Muanenguba and Tinto for Manyu Divisions) was carried out and in 2011 these six councils adopted municipal decisions bearing on gender responsive budgeting after popular gender audits.

In May and June 2014, through a request from MUDEC to PASC, another study was commissioned to ascertain the level of implementation of the municipal decisions.  The following constitutes findings from six pilot GRB councils of the South West Region of Cameroon.

  1. III.                Objectives of the Study:
  • To ascertain the degree of implementation of Municipal Decisions bearing on GRB in 6 pilot councils.
  • To determine the challenges encountered by pilot councils in engendering their budgets.
  • To propose solutions to identified gaps.

 

  1. IV.               The Scope /Tools / Methodology :

Buea for Fako, Ekondo Titi for Ndian, Kumba I for Meme, Menji for Lebialem, Nguti for Kupe Muanenguba and Tinto for Manyu.

Persons reached included Mayors, Female Deputy Mayors, Committee Chairpersons, and Councilors, Secretaries General, Municipal Treasurers,  Development and Finance Agents, Finance Officers, Beneficiaries of Council Services (Non State Actors or NSA), Council collaborators including Persons reached included Mayors, Female Deputy Mayors, Committee Chairpersons, and Councilors, Secretaries General, Female Municipal Treasurers, Female Development and Finance Agents, Finance Officers, Beneficiaries of Council Services, Council collaborators including MINPROFF, MINEPAT, MINAS, and MINADER.

The opinions of one thousand and seventy one (1,071) individuals were solicited either through questionnaires, semi structured questions, checklists and focus group discussions (see table showing council by council breakdown.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The study reached a total of one thousand and seventy one (1,071) individuals either personally or in groups. Below is a breakdown:

COUNCILS Persons contacted
  Men Women Youth Physically Challenged Others
  50 and Older 36 to 49 50 and Older 36 to 49 Male (20 to 35) Female

(20 to 35)

Cripple Blind Widows Street Children Single Mothers Sex Workers
Buea

30

40

30

40

20

20

10

5

15

5

20

Ekondo Titi

20

30

20

30

20

20

03

2

10

10

Kumba I

50

40

50

40

20

20

10

5

15

5

20

Menji

25

20

25

20

20

20

02

10

10

Nguti

20

15

20

15

20

20

02

10

10

Tinto

15

15

15

15

20

20

02

10

10

Total

160

160

160

160

120

120

19

12

70

10

80

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


  1. V.             Findings & Analysis per Council:

Data base for Financing for Gender Equality (2010 to 2013) in 6 pilot councils in the South West Region.

No Council 2010 2011 2012                                2013
1 Buea  l 5.236,832 youth Employment 17.417,315 youth Employment 11.279,562 youth Employment 5.235,832 youth Employment
    1,000.000 3.041,675 3,000.000 1,000.000
    200,000 women Group 651,933 women Group 6,000.000 women Group 5.500,000 women Group
2 Ekondo Titi 2.500,000 (W. Day) 2.500,000 (W. Day)  Same Same
       500,000 ( W. Groups) 500,000 ( W. Groups) same same
       500,000 (Youth Day)    500,000 (Youth Day) same same
        500,000 ( 20th May) 500,000 ( 20th May)  same  
        250,000 (R.W. Day) 300,000 (R.W. Day ) same  
3 Kumba II Not Available 3,000.000 1,000.000 3.140,000
      (Temporary Jobs for youths-boys, girls) (Temporary Jobs for youths-boys, girls) (Temporary Jobs for youths- boys, girls)
      5,000.000 2,000.000 2,000.000
      (grants to schools) (grants to schools) (grants to schools)
      5,000.000 2,000.000 1,000.000
      (social centers- Women groups) (social centers- Women groups) (social centers- Women groups)
4 Nguti 100,000 (women day) 100,000 (women day) 100,000 (women day) 200,000 (women day)
    200,000 (A.W. Day) 200,000 (A.W. Day) 200,000 (A.W. Day) 250,000 (A.W. Day)
    200,000(W.Empowerment 200,000(W.Empowerment 200,000(W.Empowerment 500,000(W.Empowerment
    50,000 (W. Associations) 50,000 (W. Associations) 50,000 (W. Associations) 100,000 (W. Associations)
    300,000 (Youth Day) 300,000 (Youth Day) 300,000 (Youth Day) 300,000 (Youth Day)
    1,000.000(Y. Employment). 1,000.000(Y. Employment). 1,000.000(Y. Employment). 1,000.000(Y. Employment).
5 Menji 500,000 (women Gps) 500,000 (women Gps) 500,000 (women Gps) 1.000,000 (women Gps)
    700,000(Mayor’s cup) 700,000(Mayor’s cup) 700,000(Mayor’s cup) 1.000,000(Mayor’s cup)
    400,000 (internal sports) 400,000 (internal sports) 400,000 (internal sports) 500,000 (internal sports)
6 Tinto 50,000 (Women Day) 50,000 (Women Day) 150,000 (Women Day) 250,000 (Women Day)
    900,000 (Youth Day) 900,000 (Youth Day) 950,000 (Youth Day) 1.000,000 (Youth Day)
    1,000.000 (Holiday Jobs) 1,000.000 (Holiday Jobs) 1,500.000 (Holiday Jobs) 2,000.000 (Holiday Jobs)
    1,000,000 ( For Disables) 1,000,000 ( For Disables) 1,000,000 ( For Disables) 1,000,000 ( For Disables)

 

No Council Person Contacted (category) Key Responses / Observations
1 Buea (Fako Division) Female Deputy Mayor
  1. The function of a councilor is to seat in council sessions to deliberate.

 

  1. Chairperson is not consulted during budget preparation. Role is limited to deliberation and adoption.
  2. Not aware why she is not consulted
  3. The council has no gender dimension in its budget.
  4. The council is indifferent on gender issues
  5. There is no grouping of female councilors
  6. Gender issues are not considered in the council budget since the  authorities do not see the need
  7. Gender should be incorporated in council budgets because it ensures justice, fairness and promotes equality.
  8. The challenges in incorporating gender include insuring that the authorities see the need for this and to encourage women to advocate regularly.
  9. To overcome these challenges, the authorities need to be trained on gender budgeting.
  10. We need to involve female councilors and some beneficiaries too in the trainings.

 

Female Committee Chairperson
    Secretary General
  • Our challenges include having funds to make up for the percentage in gender disparity.
  • Need for  adequate numbers of women and youths to make up for the gap in decision-making positions.
  • There is the challenge in over-coming apathy by women in leadership position and other public life.
  • We also need to cause Service Heads to see the need for gender and to institute fair salaries as a motivation.
  • The budgetary process starts with mobilization of public-stakeholders (taxation, businesspersons, women etc.) for the meeting. Next the elaboration by Council executive which is followed by the Council session.
  • Persons involved are the SG, the Treasurer, Municipal Service Heads and the Council Executives.
  • The Treasurer is involved from the start to the end to give information. The Service Heads are involved during elaboration. At implementation, it is only the Mayor, the Treasurer and the SG who are involved through the entire process.
  • Business persons are the main target for revenue collection.
  • We consider some scholarship allocation for the youths especially girls, and some support for women.
  • The council has a Council Development Plan (CDP) and a strategic Plan.
  • During elaboration of the CDP, gender was considered and some allocation is always considered for gender (e.g. support to girls, women’s Day support) during implementation.
  • Shall be willing to acquire skills in engendering the budget
  • The skills shall help us to overcome some of our challenges
    Collaborators of the Council:

 

 

1)      The nature of the collaboration between the Buea Council and the above service is horizontal. MINPROFF is usually invited in Council sessions during Project Development, to give a view point.

2)      There is gender consideration in the collaboration

3)      The views of women are considered for example during celebrations like Women’s Day, the Council gives support and that the Women Empowerment Center is regularly supported by the council.

4)      Gender is important because women are the majority and women take care of the community

5)      Our collaboration can be engendered through education; by providing equal chances for all, no forced marriages, businesses places for women, land and inheritance rights, promoting women in decision-making positions etc.

6)      MINEPAT supports the Buea Council in project realization. That MINEPAT goes all over to gather project information that can enhance development.

7)      Gender is considered.

8)      MINEPAT  looks at gender considerations in terms of the impact of a project on the public

9)      Government depicts projects and MINEPAT does monitoring in different communities.

10)  We do just control and provide advice.

11)  Councils have their tender boards. That MINEPAT can enhance our collaboration with Councils through proper communication of the Growth and Strategy Paper, and to also provide them with technical advice when there is a need

    Beneficiaries of Council Services:

 

  1. Have fair knowledge on Council functions and of services provided by the council
  2. Have  benefited from some council services like support given to women during Women Day activities, the construction of basic infrastructures like public toilets, market stores.
  3. Have no knowledge about the Council budgetary process and have never been invited for it.
  4. Did not vote during the 2013 elections because there is always rigging so she is not interested.
  5. Shall run as a councilor in other to ensure the implementation of women’s project
  6. Will also vote for a female councilor to increase their influence
  7. Have little knowledge how the council functions but knows the council executes projects like grading of roads, cleaning of the town, build market shades and public toile
  8. Have benefited from council services like collection of waste, and utilization of market structures
2 Ekondo Titi (Ndian Division)  Female Deputy Mayor:

 

  • Handles town planning, collect market tolls, handles sanitation and social issues like Youth Day and Women Day activities.
  •  Partially consulted during budget preparation and her role is to give suggestions on issues that she handles as stated above.
  • The council always has the gender dimension in budgeting. This is by including the needs of women and others in every budgetary session, but the different target groups are not separated.
  • Bbelongs to groupings of Female Councilors and Mayors. She is a member of the tender board of Mayors where she represents the Ekondo Titi Mayor. She is also a member of the South West Association of Female Mayors.
  • Ensures that gender is always incorporated in the council budget. This is done by mainstreaming gender in all issues. At such the situation of gender has increased.
  • Gender should be incorporated because women and youth are the most vulnerable and marginalized.
  • A major challenge is to develop the spirit of advocacy in the different gender groups and to overcome traditional practices like limited economic and political powers allocated to women and the youth.
  •  Also enable women to develop more self-confidence. Also to stop early marriages.
  • To overcome these challenges, we need sensitization with targeted percentages to be realized, not just decisions on paper. We need government policies with the approved articles to be respected by all.

 

     Council Accountant:

 

  1. Gender places a role in his work and that of the council in general. That out of 25 workers, 11 are female and in the Finance Department there is one female cahier, one female clerk and one female finance agent.
  2. Beneficiaries are analyzed in terms of gender, since in budgeting Ekondo Titi Council always considers maternity leaves for women. Social issues like Women’s Day are always considered. Women forums benefit also. He said over 500,000 FRS was benefited last year women forums and an organization like the Council Women Association had 150,000 FRS. Some others also benefited.
  3. The Council analyzes in terms of gender. So they are gender responsive in budgeting
  4. The analysis is done quantitatively in Ekondo Titi and the frequency is every year.
  5. The role of the Treasurer is to provide statistics of beneficiary groups of the previous year so that the council can know whether to improve on services and how. The Treasurer also ensures the payment of staff benefits to insurance.
  6. The challenges include getting adequate number of beneficiaries in groups. If gotten, it helps in supporting quantitatively. They also envisage the challenge in getting groups registered in the council and other services around
  7. We envisage these problems because thorough findings and elaborate communication are not easily done about groups.
    1. In engendering the budget, the council should always invite the Treasurer and Finance Agents in all budget sessions
    Council Collaborators:

 

  • The relationship with the Ekondo Titi Council is cordial. MINPROFF is always invited for the Ekondo Titi Council budgetary sessions and the Council helps to sponsor Women Day activities, Rural Women Day and the Day of the Family. Also helps to give free legalization of marriages.
  • Gender considerations are important because it helps to reduce marginalization and ensure equality of all.
  • The council can further do promotion of gender by supporting women with equipment not only finance and could even help Common Initiative Groups(CIGs) to develop or increase in the council area.
  • Support to women does not go far to grassroots level but support to CIGs can go far, even to rural areas.
    Council Beneficiaries:

 

ü  The council functions with directives from the Mayor as the head. The other authorities have assigned roles while the staffs are delegated on assignments. Every year, a budget is developed and adopted by councilors during budgetary sessions. Various stakeholders are also invited for the budget adoption. Implementation of identified projects is then done.

ü  The council provides support for infrastructure, education, health and other social support.

ü  Have not benefited in any council service except from stipends in the cause of doing work.

ü  Have no knowledge of the council budgetary process

ü  Not consulted as a beneficiary group

ü  The council provides infrastructure and  maintenance, clean the town, and provides holiday jobs.

3 Kumba I (Meme Division) Secretary General,
  • Budget building starts with an orientation meeting with stakeholders
  • Those involved in budgeting include the Secretary General (SG) who chairs in process, there is the Finance Clerk, the Treasurer, and the Mayor
  • The Finance Clerk provides administrative documents, the Treasurer complements and provides bank statements, while the SG builds the budget.
  • The target groups considered in budgeting are youths and women
  • The gender dimension is considered but timidly because there are few women who work in that domain and the few here are not proactive.
  •  The challenges in engendering our budget are having proactive men and available women
  • We need skills to engender our budget
  • Skills acquired shall make everyone to be proactive and to be engaged in collecting data on gender issues
    Committee Chairpersons:

 

:

1)      Functions include to go through the books and give suggestions to improve work

2)      Regularly consulted in budgeting now, but not in the past

3)      All dimensions of gender are considered when presented

4)      Gender is important because it avoids marginalization of any group.

5)      Persons involve are the Secretary General (SG) as the Chairperson, the Mayor and the Finance Committee.

6)      Committees are not given attention because of administrative lapses

7)      The Council’s budget has very little gender dimension

8)      Very few proactive women and youths in the area to ensure that the Council budget

is gender sensitive.

9)      The Council periodically, provides support to the youth and physically challenged persons.

10)  Gender issues are not our regular needs so they have no place in the budget. Notwithstanding, the everyday needs like water, good roads, construction of markets, are of much more help but to the different gender groups since it ease their operations.

 

    Collaborators of the Council:

 

  • See previous councils
    Beneficiaries of Council Services:

 

  1. In the Council, the Mayor works with his deputies and Councilors to decide on issues. That a committee develops the administrative accounts and the budget. Then the Mayor and the Secretary General (SG) decide on the implementation. The council also invites some services to take decisions when necessary
  2. The services mentioned as provided by the council include road maintenance work, project realization like water, collection of Market tolls etc.
  3. Have benefited from Council services like payments of her meeting allowances
  4. Have no knowledge of the stages in the budget preparation.
  5. Regularly invited  to question issues during the budgetary session
  6. Contributes by  questioning issues for clarification
  7. Also gives advice during sessions
  8. Do not participate in the process or stages but during the last buildup session involving all.
4 Menji (Lebialem Division) Secretary General, 1) The budget building starts with an orientation meeting with stakeholders

2) Persons involved include the SG as Chairperson, the Finance Clerk, the Treasurer, and the Mayor

3) The Finance Clerk provides administrative documents, the Treasurer complements and provides bank statements, while the SG builds the budget.

4) The target groups considered are; youths, women, – but the council is not very gender sensitive.

5)  The gender dimension was considered but these are not many because there are no women who work in that domain.

6) Female staff are not proactive.

6) The Council has a Communal Development Plan (CDP)

7) Nothing affects the CDP process on elaboration, implementation, monitoring and investment because nothing is talked about Gender Responsive Budgeting.

8) The challenges in engendering the budget here are having proactive men and available women

9) Said they need skills to engender their budget

10) Skills acquired shall make everyone to be proactive and to be engaged in collecting data on gender issues.

 

    Committee Chairpersons:

 

 

Same as Ekondo Titi Council.

    Collaborators of the Council:

 

1)      The nature of the collaboration between the Menji Council and the above service is horizontal, she said. MINPROFF is usually invited in Council sessions during Project Development, to give a view point.

2)      That there is gender consideration in the collaboration

3)      The view of women is considered for example on water projects; women are the most touched, since they often go out for it. During celebrations like Women’s Day, the Council gives support. The Women Empowerment Center is run by the Mayor though the Center has a Director. But the Mayor is a vote holder.

4)      Gender considerations are very important

5)      Gender is important because women are the majority and women take care of the community

6)      Our collaboration can be engendered through education; by providing equal chances for all, no force marriages, businesses places be encouraged for women, land and inheritance right, promoting women in decision-making positions etc.

    Beneficiaries of Council Services:

 

Similar results from previous councils
5 Nguti (Kupe Muanenguba Division) Female Deputy Mayor:

 

  1. Duties as the Deputy Mayor is to handle town planning, handle marketing, tolls, sanitation and social issues like Youth Day and Women Day activities.
  2.  Partially consulted during budget and her role is to give suggestions on related issues above.
  3. The council always has the gender dimension in budgeting. This is by including the needs of women and others in every budgetary session. But though trained on budget preparation, different target groups are not separated because if this is done, it becomes a stigmatization.
  4. Belongs to groupings of Female Councilors and Mayors. She is a member of the tender board of Mayors where she represents the Nguti Mayor. She is the Chairperson of the Electricity Committee and represents women. Also a member of the South West Association of Female Mayors.
  5. Gender be incorporated because women and youth are the most vulnerable and marginalized, so need to regular attention
  6. A major challenge is overcoming traditional practices that do not give women a place. Another one is enabling women to be proactive and stop being shy. Also to stop early marriages. And to enable men to give attention to gender issues and not deft ears as many do.
  7. To overcome these challenges, we need sensitization with targeted percentages to be realized, not just decisions on paper. We need government policies with the approved articles to be respected by all.

 

     Council Accountant:

 

  1. Gender plays a role in his work and that of the council in general. That out of 26 workers, 12 are female and in the Finance Department there is One female cahier, one female clerk and one female finance agent
  2. Beneficiaries are analyzed in terms of gender since in budgeting Nguti council always considers maternity leaves for women. Social issues like Women’s Day are always considered. Women forums benefited a lot. Last year they had 400,000 FRS. Organizations like the Council Women Association had 150,000CFA Frs. Some others also benefited.
  3. The council analyzes in terms of gender, in other to be gender responsive in budgeting
  4. The analysis is done quantitatively in Nguti and the frequency is every year.
  5. The role of the Treasurer is to provide statistics of beneficiary groups of the previous year so that the council can know whether to improve on services and how. The Treasurer also ensures the payment of staff benefits to insurance.
  6. The challenges include getting adequate number of beneficiaries in groups. If gotten, it helps in supporting quantitatively. They also envisage the challenge in getting groups registered in the council and other services around.
  7. We envisage these problems because thorough findings and elaborate communication are not easily done about groups.
  8. In engendering the budget, the council should always invite the Treasurer and Finance Agents in all budget sessions

 

    Council Collaborators:

 

  • That their relationship with the Nguti council is cordial. MINPROFF is always invited for council budgetary meetings and the council helps to sponsor Women Day activities, Rural Women Day and the Day of the Family. Also helps to give free legalization of marriages.
  • That gender considerations are important because it helps to reduce marginalization and ensure equality
  • She mentioned that the council can further do promotion of gender by supporting women with tools not only finance and could even help CIGs to develop or increase in the council area.
  • That general support to women does not go far to grassroots level but support to CIGs can go far, even to rural areas.

 

     Council Beneficiaries:

 

Similar to previous councils
6 TINTO (Manyu Division)  Secretary General

 

v  The budgetary process starts with mobilization of public-stakeholders (Taxation, businesspersons, women etc.) for the meeting. Next the elaboration by Council executive, then the Council session.

v  Persons involved are the SG, the Treasurer, Municipal Service Heads and the Council Executives.

v  Shall be willing to acquire skills in engendering the budget

v  The skills shall help us to overcome short-comings

    Committee Chairperson

 

  1. Not consulted during budget preparation but only adopts
  2. The Council has no gender dimension in its budget.
  3. The Council is negligent and lacks enough knowledge on gender issues
  4. Do not belong to any grouping of female councilors
  5. Gender issues are not considered in the Council budget since authorities do not see the need
  6. Gender should be incorporated in council budgets because it ensures justice, fairness and promotes equality.
  7. The challenges in incorporating gender include insuring that the authorities see the need for this and to encourage women to advocate regularly for this.
  8. To overcome these challenges, the authorities need to be trained on gender budgeting. We need to involve female councilors and some beneficiaries too in the trainings.
    Beneficiaries of Council Services:

 

  1. Do not know how the Council functions and not aware of services provided by the council
  2. Have not benefited from the Council services; has no knowledge about the budgetary process and the last time she went in during the elaboration process was last two years and they were sent out because they were not invited. That the Council does not accept them.
  3. Did  not vote during the 2013 elections because rigging would have made it to have no difference.
  4. Shall run as a councilor in other to ensure the implementation of women’s project
  5. Will also vote for a female councilor to increase their influence
  6. Not aware how the council functions but knows the council executes projects like provision of classrooms, build market shades and toilets.
  7. Has not benefited from council services
  8. Has never been consulted during any budget session, though she was once a pioneer WCPDM member in Tinto
  9. Shall vote any female candidate because their party is greedy to gender, so needs forceful persons to promote gender.
  10. The council staff through directives from the Mayor, does tax control, and finances community projects.
  11. Services provided by the councils are cleaning of the town, provision of infrastructure, and guide against destruction by animals.
  12. Has benefited from a market shade provided by the council.
  13. Has no idea on the budget preparation process and have never been consulted on this

 


Key Observations:

}  There is a wide disparity between theory and practice of Gender Responsive Budgeting (GRB) in local councils. Council authorities are quick to narrate which supposed to be done and not what they do. This justifies a knowledgeable population that will advocate for the correct things to be done.

}  Councils do not have Gender Disaggregated Data on planning, implementation, monitoring & evaluation of council activities. Basic gender information is limited to Women Day, Labour Day, Youth Holiday Employment and Scholarships to Youths.

}  Council staff do not master the skills to engender the budget (see Mayors’ Action Plans, & munities of issues raised during committee deliberations)

}  Key collaborators / partners (MINPROFF, MINEPAT, MINAS, and PNDP) do not insist on gender disaggregation for council activities. They either lack the knowledge or the will. They might even be gender blind.

}  Beneficiaries of council activities are either unaware or nonchalant on the need to track the gender composition of council activities.

 

  1. VI.           Challenges Encountered:
  • Non State Actors (women, youth, socio professional groups) lack knowledge on the function of their local councils consequently they are reduced to grumbling on the poor services provided by the councils.
  • Councilors could not offer solutions to the gender demise because they are only consulted during deliberative sessions.
  • There is limited communication between councilors, staff and the population.
  • Challenges to access information from Local Councils and Supervisory Authorities. Information management is a major problem in all pilot councils. Council documents are filed in several locations including the homes of authorities
  • Limited knowledge on the part of Non State Actors (women, youth, and persons with disabilities) to seek redress to their plight.
  • Several locally elected officials could not articulate their functions as leaders and the quality  services they are called upon to provide.

 

 

  1. VII.         Recommendations:

ü  Review the Communal Development Plans (CDP) through the Mid Term Expenditure Framework (MITEF) to incorporate gender issues such that the Mayor’s Action Plan and the annual budgets are gender reflective.

ü  Create & support functional Women Foundations for Inclusive Governance (WOFIG) in all municipalities in the region. These foundations will sustain the sensitization of the population and maintain regular advocacy for GRB in councils.

ü  Create functional Gender Committees in each council which should be headed by a female elected official. This committee will ensure that gender issues are deliberated before the adoption of the council budget.

ü  Hold regular consultations (may be quarterly) between the Council Executive, Secretary General, Municipal Treasurer, and executives of WOFIG. The objectives will centre on planning, review and evaluation of GRB in their respective councils.

ü  Create & maintain a data base on Council Funding for Gender Equality.

ü  Train non state actors on how to make use of the recently created Administrative Courts to seek redress to gender gaps.

ü  Disseminate copies of the draft Gender Policy for Cameroon and empower WOFIG members to implement the contents with local realities.

ü  The need for a minimum qualification for being a Councillor / Mayor.

 

  1. VIII.           Conclusion:

The GRB study conducted in six pilot councils was timely because newly locally elected officials have taken office and are anxious to engage the initiative of inclusive governance. Most female councilors are eager to see the gender dimensions of budgeting increased. Gender students, practitioners and activists now have a call behind which to rally. From the recommendations, a roadmap could be developed at local levels in engendering the CDP, MITEF and the annual budget.

The creation of functional gender committees are in line with the aspirations of the Ministry of Women Affairs & the Family. Furthermore the Government of Cameroon is on record toward program budgeting which ties with the recommendation to engender the CDP through the MITEF.

It is the sincere wish from this consultancy that the recommendations should be highly circulated to all development actors within the region and Cameroon in general.

 

 

QUESTIONNAIRE FOR MAYORS and SG

This questionnaire is meant to collect data on Gender Responsive Budgeting in your Council. We will be very grateful if you responses are frank & precise.

  1. Please describe steps within the budget process of your council?­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­___________________
  2. Identify persons involved in the preparation of the budget? ____________________
  3. How & When (what stage)  are they  involved ___________________
  4. List the various target groups you consider when drawing your budgets.____________
  5. What are the various gender dimensions you consider when budgeting? __________
  6. Does your council have a Communal Development Plan? ………………………………….
  7. How did the Municipal Decision bearing on Gender Responsive Budgeting affect the CDP process (elaboration, implementation of Investments, monitoring & evaluation)
  8. Do you encounter any challenges in engendering your budgets?
  9. Would you be willing to acquire skills to engender your budget?___________________
  10. Why and How ……………………………………………………………………….

Request and Check the Administrative Accounts of the council for the last three years.

Data Needed:

  • Total Amounts received and spent for 2010, 2011 and 2012
  • Amounts spent per sector (health, education, culture, employment, Sports, water, road works, Commerce, etc)for each year
  • Amounts spent per target group (women, youth, elderly, widows, etc…) for each year

Request and Check the Public Investment Budget (PIB) for 2010, 2011 and 2012:

  • Total Amounts received and spent for 2010, 2011 and 2012
  • Amounts spent per sector for each year
  • Amounts spent per target group for each year

 

 

FEMALE DEPUTY MAYORS/COMMITTEE CHAIRPERSONS

This questionnaire is meant to collect data on Gender Responsive Budgeting in Councils. We will be very grateful if you respond to these questions frankly.

  1. How long have you been a Deputy Mayor?____________________
  2. What are your functions as Deputy Mayor? ……………………………
  3. Are you usually consulted during the budget process?_________________
  4. If yes, what is part do you play?_______________________________
  5. If no, Why are you not consulted?______________________________________
  6. Does your council budget have gender dimensions?_____________________
  7. If yes, state how;____________________________________________________
  8. If no, state why._____________________________________________________
  9. Do you belong to any grouping of female councilors or Mayors?____________
  10. If yes, why was it created (objectives)?_________________________
  11. How does it function?_________________________________
  12. If no, why not.______________________________________________________
  13. Do you ensure that gender issues are incorporated in your council budget?______________
  14. If yes, how? _________________ if no, why?………………………………………
  15. Why should gender be incorporated in council budgets ._____________
  16. In your opinion, what are some of the challenges in engendering the council budget? …………………………………………

________________________________________________________________

  1. What do you think could be done to overcome these challenges ………………

FEMALE MUNICIPAL TREASURERS

This questionnaire is meant to collect data on Gender Responsive Budgeting in Councils. We will be very grateful if you respond to these questions frankly.

  1. Does gender play a role in your work?_________________________________________
  2. Describe how, if your answer is yes.__________________________________
  3. If not, why?______________________________________________________________
  4. Do you analyze council beneficiaries on the basis of gender?  __________________
  5. If yes, why______________________________________________________________
  6. What type (quality, quantity / frequency & amounts) of contracts do women have in your council? ………………………………
  7. What role could the municipal treasurer play to engender the council budget?_______
  8. What challenges could the MT encounter in playing this role?___________________
  9. Why do you envision these problems.________________________________________
  10. In a council that has a Municipal Deliberation on Engendering the Budget, how in your opinion can the decision be enforced? …………………………………………

COLLABORATORS OF THE COUNCIL

This questionnaire is meant to collect data on Gender Responsive Budgeting in Councils. We will be very grateful if you respond to these questions frankly.

  1. What service do you represent? 1. MINPOFF             2. MINEPAT
  2. What is the nature of your collaboration with the council?_____________________
  3. Are there any gender considerations in this collaboration?____________________
  4. If yes, explain how._____________________________________________________
  5. Is it important to have gender considerations in your collaboration?_____________
  6. Why / Why not?_______________________________________
  7. How could your collaboration with the council be engendered?________________

 

BENEFICIARIES OF COUNCIL SERVICES

This questionnaire is meant to collect data on Gender Responsive Budgeting in Councils. We will be very grateful if you respond to these questions frankly.

  1. Profession: _________________
  2. Age: ___________     Sex ……………………………
  3. Highest Level of Education:____________________
  4. Do you know how the council functions?_____________________
  5. If yes, how?__________________________________________________
  6. Which services are provided by the council?__________________________________
  7. Have you benefited from any council service?   Which one and how______________
  8. Do you have knowledge about the council budget process?____________________
  9. If yes, what do you know?__________________________________________________
  10. Have you ever been consulted during the budget process?_______________________
  11. If yes, how?____________________________________________
  12. What ideas or contribution did you make?____________________________
  13.  When was the last time you were consulted?___________________________________
  14. Have you benefitted from the council budget process?_______________________
  15. Did you vote for councilors during the 2007 elections?_________________________
  16. Why or Why not?____________________________________________
  17. How did you vote?________________________________________________________
  18. Have you registered to vote in 2013?________________________________________
  19. Why?___________________________________________________________________
  20. Would you run to become a councilor?____________________________________
  21. If yes, why?__________________  If no, why? ………………………………………..
  22. Would you vote for any female candidate?_____________________________________
  23. If yes, why?______________________________________________________________
  24. If no, why? ………………………………………….

 

 

 


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