Municipal Development Counselling (MUDEC) Group .:: MUDEC GROUP ::.
  • Our Mission

    • Reducing poverty in our municipalities through encouraging gender equality and increasing citizen (End User) participation in democratic and governance processes.

Kombo Itindi Development Plan

Table of Contents

Table of Contents……………………………………………………………………………1

List of Abbreviations…………………………………………………………………………3

List of Tables…………………………………………………………………………………4

List of  Figures and Maps…………………………………………………………………… 4

1. 0.     INTRODUCTION…………………………………………………………………..5

1.1.      Context and Justification……………………………………………………………..5

1.2.      Objectives of the CDP………………………………………………………………..6

1.3.      Structure of the CDP………………………………………………………………….6

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY…………………………………………………………………7

2. 0.     METHODOLOGY…………………………………………………………………..8

2.1.      Preparatory Process……………………………………………………………………8

2.2.      Collection and Analysis of Information……………………………………………….8

2.3.      Data Consolidation and Mapping……………………………………………………..10

2.4.      Planning Workshop, Resource Mobilization & Programming………………………..10

2.5.      Participatory Monitoring & Evaluation Mechanism…………………………………..11

3.0.      SUMMARY PRESENTATION OF THE COUNCIL……………………………13

3.1.      Description of the Biophysical Environment…………………………………………13

3.2.      History and People of the Council (origin of the people, population, ethnic groups,

religions, main economic activities)…………………………………………………….16

3.3.      Main Potentials and Resources of the Council……………………………………….20

3.4.      Thematic Maps……………………………………………………………………….20

4.0.      SUMMARY OF PARTICIPATORY DIAGNOSIS………………………………22

4.1.      Consolidation of Diagnosis Information (Excel Sheets)………………………………..21

4.2.      Main Problems and Needs (4.3.) identified per Sector…………………………………26.

4.4.      Table of Priority Projects per Village (Key Sectors)…………………………………….35

5.0.      STRATEGIC PLANNING…………………………………………………………….39

5.1.      Vision & Objective of the Communal Development Plan (CDP)……………………..39

5.2.      Logical Framework by Sector………………………………………………………….40

5.3.      Land Use Plan………………………………………………………………………69

6.0.      OPERATIONAL PLANNING…………………………………………………70

6.1.      CDP Budget………………………………………………………………………..70

6.2.      Mid Term (3 year) Expenditure Framework (MITEF)……………………………..71

6.3.      Annual Investment Plan (AIP)……………………………………………………..75

6.3.1.   Available Resources & Periodicity…………………………………………………75

6.3.2. Annual Plan (2012) of Priority Projects……………………………………………..75

6.4.      Simplified Environmental Mangement Framework of the MITEF………………..80

6.4.1.  Main Potential Impacts (social & environmental) and Mitigating measures………80

6.4.2.   Simplifed Socio – environmental Management Plan……………………………….82

6.5.      Contract Award Plan………………………………………………………………84

7.0.      MONITORING & EVALUATION MECHANISM……………………………87

7.1.      Composition & Functioning Follow up Committee………………………………..87

7.2.      Indicators for Monitoring & Evaluation System and (compared to AIP & sectorial

policies)……………………………………………………………………………88

7.3.      Follow up Plans, Tools & Monitoring Frequency…………………………………88

7.4.      CDP Review & Mechanism for the next (2013) AIP………………………………91

7.5.      Communication Plan of the CDP…………………………………………………92

8.0.      CONCLUSION…………………………………………………………………..93

9.0.      ANNEXES………………………………………………………………………..94

9.1. Prefectural Order Rendering Functional the CDP

9.2. Municipal Delideration Validating the CDP

9.3. Validated Support Administrative Documents

9.4. Attendance Sheets

9.5. Picture Gallery

9.6. Reports of Diagnosis (CID, USD, Consolidated Village by Village) 

LIST OF ABBREVATIONS

No Abbreviation  Full Name
01 CDP Communal Development Plan
02 CEFAM Centre de Formation de l’Administration Municipale(Local Government Training Center)
03 CIG Common Initiative Groups
04 CID Council Institutional Diagnosis
05 DO Divisional Officer
06 FEICOM Fonds Special d’Equipement et d’Intervention Intercommunale(Special Council Support Fund for Local Authorities)
07 FSLC First School Leaving Certificate
08 GCE General Certificate of Education
09 GESP Growth Employment Strategy Paper
10 GoC Government of Cameroon
11 HIV/AIDS Human Immuno Deficiency Virus/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome
12 LSO Local Support Organization
13 KIC Kombo Itindi Council
14 MDG Millenium Development Goals
15 MINEPAT Ministry of the Economy, Planning and Regional Development
16 MINEPIA Ministry of Livestock, Fisheries and Animal Husbandry
17 MINATD Ministry of Territorial Administration and Decentralization
18 MITEF Mid Term Investment Framework
19 MUDEC Municipal Development Counselling Group
20 MT Municipal Treasurer
21 PIB Public Investment Budget
22 PNDP Programme Nationale Developpement Participatif (National Community Driven Development Program)
23 PV Payment Voucher
24 SDO Senior Divisional Officer (Supervisory Authority)
25 SOWEDA South West Development Authority
26 ST Sub Treasurer
27 SWOT Strengths Weaknesses Opportunities Threats
28 BIR Bataillon Intervention Rapide (Rapid Intervention Batallion)
29 NBDC National Book Development Council
30 VDC Village Development Committee
31 VTC Village Traditional Council

LIST OF TABLES

Table 1: Population Densities by Age Groups 14
Table 2: Population Distribution by Gender 15
Table 3: Asset, Potential and Constriants 17
Table 4: Financial Situation of KIC (2008-2010) 23
List of Figures & Maps XXXX
Figure 1: Population Distribution by Age 14
Figure 2: Population Distribution by Gender 15
Figure 3: Map of KIC 18
Figure 4: Organizational Chart of KIC 22
Figure 5: Landuse Map of KIC 66

1.0.  INTRODUCTION

1.1    Context and Justification 

The Government of Cameroon in July 2004 enacted the Law on Decentralization as Applicable to Local Council which mandated councils to provide basic services in several domains including economic, social, health, education, and culture and sports development within their municipalities. The Government has since fostered the process through other instruments such as the Growth and Employment Strategy Paper (GESP), the MDGs, the MAPUTO & ACCRA Conventions which are geared at making the country an emergent economy by 2035. Councils have received funds transferred through the Public Investment Budget (PIB) in some key ministries such as Basic and Secondary Education, Public Health, Women Empowerment and Social Affairs.

The following decrees have also fostered the process:

  • Decree N° 2010/0242/PM of 26th February 2010 with regards to the promotion of agricultural production and rural development.
  • Decree N° 2010/0242/PM of 26th February 2010 with regards to the promotion of livestock and fish farming.
  • Decree N° 2010/0242/PM of 26th February 2010 with regards to the construction and maintenance of rural unclassified roads and with  regards to potable water supply in the zones not covered by the public network for the distribution of water conceded by the State.

Further to all these efforts, the National Community Driven Development Programme (PNDP) was commissioned to contribute meaningfully toward poverty alleviation using participatory strategies at the level of local councils. Within the framework for the execution of PNDPactivities, a cooperation agreement was signed in July 2011 between Kombo Itindi Council, the PNDP (SW-RCU) and MUDEC Group (a Local Support Organization) in which the PNDP has offered technical and financial support to enable MUDEC Group accompany Kombo Itindi Council toward the elaboration of its Communal Development Plan (CDP).

1.2. Overall Objective of the CDP:

The overall objective of the Communal Development Plan is to participatorily involve all development stakeholders toward the identification, analysis and documentation of their felt human, material and financial needs and to collectively ensure the follow up of the execution of all development initiatives within their municipality.

Specific Objectives include to;  

  • Sensitize all development stakeholders within the municipality to encourage participation and ownership of the planning process.
  • Conduct participatory diagnosis at the council level (CID), urban level (USD), and village level (consolidated village diagnosis).
  • Institute a Follow up Committee to monitor the implementation of micro projects.
  • Build partnership and resources (financial, material, human) between the council and its development stakeholders.
  • Encourage communal development planning as a process in participatory development and sustainability in poverty reduction, growth and employment creation.

1.3   Structure of the CDP :

This document is structured in nine (09) sections as follows:

  • Introduction.
  • Executive Summary
  • Methodology.
  • Presentation of the Council.
  • Summary of Diagnosis Results.
  • Strategic Planning.
  • Operational Planning.
  • Monitoring and Evaluation Mechanism.
  • Conclusion

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

With a determined effort at poverty reduction at the level of local councils, the GoC has instituted several instruments (GESP, 2004 Law on Decentralization, Inter Ministerial/ Sectorial Commissions, the 2010 Transfer of Resources and Competencies) which collectively are designed to positively impact on the lives of the average Cameroonian. In the same vein, the National Community Driven Development Programme (PNDP) was recently commissioned to actualize this GoC effort by facilitating the elaboration of Communal Development Plans (CDP) in the country. In KIC in Ndian Division of the South West Region, the PNDP supported the council in engaging the Local Support Organization (MUDEC Group) to accompany it in participatory planning processes. From 4th July to 15th December 2011, the methodology prescribed by the PNDP was carefully followed which resulted in the production of this document.

A summary of the key findings reveal the major concerns of the population to include; low agricultural productivity, poor fishing methods, deforestation, environmental degradation, high insecurity, poor urban space planning, insufficient educational and health facilities, high prevalence of HIV/AIDS, poor drinking water, no electricity, enclavement and exposure to erosion.

The strategic plan accounts for problems and needs in thirty (30) sectors with an estimated cost of three thousand four hundred seventy four million, three hundred thousand francs CFA (3.474.300.000 FCFA). The plan is expected to cover six (06) Annual Investment Plans (AIP) beginning with the 2012 AIP. The Monitoring and Evaluation Plan includes a follow up team comprising of competent and available individuals who have been coached with the appropriate tools designed to facilitate their work. A Communication Plan has been included to enable widening the circulation of the contents of this CDP.

The main challenge for the council lies in its ability and resolve to implement the contents of this CDP. The council executive (whether there are changes after the upcoming municpal elections) should continue to play the pivotal role of mobilizing and organizing all stakeholders through inclusive strategies that will enable the vision of the municipality to be steadily realized.

2.0.   METHODOLOGY

2.1.   Preparatory Process

The preparatory phase of the elaboration of the CDP of Kombo Itindi municipality involved several activities. The process started with the training of key LSO personnel in Ekona by officials of the PNDP which culminated with the signing of the contract between the council (represented by the mayor), the LSO (represented by its team leader) and the South West Regional Coordinator of the PNDP. A restitution of the training to other MUDEC research assistants was conduted and several planning meetings were held with the management of Kombo Itindi council.  Secondary data on the socio economic and environmental situation within the municipality was collected and trianguted from technical services at the subdivisional, divisional and regional levels. This was followed by an elaborate sensitization campaign of stakeholders including traditional authorities, women and youth group representatives, the local administrative heads of technical services, socio professional groups and international organizations operating within the municipality. Some sensitization material (including fliers, posters, banners) carried the planning process as well as messages designed to heighten participation of all stakeholders. This process ended with the holding of the official launching workshop on the 2nd of August 2011. MUDEC presented an elaborate program of the data to be collected at the council, urban space and in all villages per sector. A Steering Committee was put in place by the Mayor with clearly defined terms of reference. An expected result was that stakeholders returned with vivid plans on the agenda of the data collection teams. The workshop was chaired by the Senior Divisional officer for Ndian and was attended by 53 participants (mostly councilors) who represented all shades of opinion within the municipality.

2.2.   Collection  and Analysis of Information

Primary data was collected and diagnosed at three different levels namely; the Council Institutional Diagnosis (CID), the Urban Space Diagnosis (USD) and the Sectorial Village by Village Diagnosis. During the CID, researchers started with literature review by reading through council documents relating to financial, material and personnel matters. Interviews and focus group discussions were also conducted to enable the team update and triangulate information gathered. At the internal level of the CID, council authorities including the Mayor, Councilors, the Secretary General and the Finance Clerk represented sources of information while at the external level public and private development partners such traditional and religious authorities, VDC members, technical service heads, contractors and beneficiaries of council services were interviewed. This strategy enabled us to collect descriptive data on the systems, structures, staff, management style, culture of the council as well as to establish strengths and weaknesses of the council. Data related to the level of interaction between development partners and the council was also collected. A combination of data collection tools were utilized including semi structured interviews, direct observations, focus discussions and questionnaires. All information collected was triangulated with other sources at the council, divisional or regional levels.

The USD was conducted in Barracks (commercial center) and Ngosso I (administrative headquarter). Though relatively very small by most standards in terms of population and infrastructure, several villagers participated mostly out of curiousity and later testified that the meetings represented the first time tthat the main speakers were neither military, administrative or council authorities. The services of local facilitators were highly solicited and this contributed to the high rate of participation. Data was collected and analyzed using a variety of tools including participatory mapping, socio economic and environmental surveys and meetings with socio professional group representatives. Participants also engaged in transect walks, simple ranking, producing venn diagrams, focus group discussions and problem analysis using problem and objective trees. Waypoints were collected using the Global Positioning System (GPS). Interactive discussions, direct observations and site visits were also utilized in certain areas in the municipality. The historical timeline assisted participants to identify previous development efforts and their partners within the urban spaces.

The participatory village by village diagnosis covered thirty two (32) villages including; Ngosso I, Ngosso II, Ngosso III, Useh Uya Ofagah, Useh Obom  Opah I, Useh Obom  Opah II, Oche Iwake Osuk, Useh  Uyah, Iwaha  Njat II, Barracks, New Barracks, Useh Usang, Promise Land, Useh Uyoh, Macauley, Ewondo, Water Creek, Oichere Atire Okoso, Uchong Usang, Oboh Affeh, God Promise, Isu, Njat I, Njat II, Useh  Mparawah, Uche Asord, Effah Effah, Iwaha Njat I, New Kombo I, New Kombo II, Effah and Suel. Six research assistants went to the field for this exercise and they spent an average of three days in the critical villages in order to actually solicit and secure valuable information from a cross section of community members. Their security within the municipality was assured by the constant presence of the BIR.

The village by village and sector by sector data collection and diagnosis (Problem Identification and Analysis) were participatory in that all the different stakeholders and all shades of opinion were given equal opportunities to make valuable comtributions. During plenary exercises men, women and youth collectively identified the core problems per sector which were later prioritized, analyzed and reformulated using problem and objective trees for causes and effects.

Participatory Rural Appraisal (PRA) methods with gender considerations were utilized to assemble field realities. These included: meetings, semi structured interviews, focus group discussions, participative mappings, transect walks, simple ranking, venn diagrams, and problem analysis using problem and objective trees.   Interactive discussions, direct observations and site visits were also utilized in certain areas in the municipality. Waypoints were collected using the Global Positioning System (GPS). Information collected was triangulated with various sources at the council, sub divisional, divisional and regional levels.

2.3.  Consolidation of Data, Mapping and Diagnosis

Data consolidation was engaged immediately after the collection process. Facilitators used statistical software for data entry which facilitated the differentiation and presention of qualitative and quantitative analysis. GIS software was used for the production of geo referenced maps.

The consolidated data (presented on excel sheets) was analyzed to generate tables, graphs, pie charts and bar charts. The consolidation effort secured the new names (established by the KIC) of the villages and also the diagnosis identified three uninhabited villages (Useh Uya Ofagah, Iwaha Njat II and Suel) because the Nigerian settler population has not returned since the cessation of hostilities that took place within the Bakassi Peninsular.

 

2.4. Planning Workshop, Resource Mobilization and Programming

During this workshop several activities were carried out including:

Restitution of  the diagnosis report by sector and by village ;

Restitution of the Logical Framework sector by sector;

Programming  and  Prioritisation of investments for the MITEF (3 years) and the AIP (first year) ;

Evaluation of  the environmental strategy of the AIP

Putting in place the Follow up Committee with clear terms of reference with an action plan.

Elaboration of a contract award plan for the first year (2012).

2.5.Implementation of Participatory Monitoring and Evaluation Mechanism

A Steering Committee was constituted and installed by the Mayor and the Divisional Delegate of MINEPAT for Ndian. It comprised six members (one female) all but one were councillors who represented various constituencies within the municipality. A major criterion for their selection was their availability and ability to comprehend development information and to communicate with the settler population who constitute more than 95% of the population in Kombo Itindi council area.

Steering Committee members:

No Name Position Other Information
01 Richard Njombe Akime Chairperson Secretary General, KIC
02 Mary Esuk Effiong Secretary Councilor
03 Ayuk Hanson Baiye Member Councilor
04 Amah Alphonse Ake Member Councilor
05 Bau Henry Member Councilor
06 Beta Emmanuel Member Councilor

Source : CID Survey 2011

Steering Committee functions:

Review the daily slates and action plans submitted by the LSO.

Follow up the activities of the LSO in the various villages.

Assure a healthy working relationship between the council, villagers and the LSO

Hold monthly meetings and submit reports with recommendations to the Mayor.

Make valuable inputs during plenary and validation meetings.

2.0.  BRIEF PRESENTATION OF THE COUNCIL AREA

2.1. Description of the municipality

3.1.1. The South West Region:

The South West Province was created by decree no 72/349 of June 1972 with Buea as its administrative headquarters. The 1996 Constitution (Article 61) created the regional system in Cameroon thus the current appellation of South West Region. It covers a surface area of 24,910 km2 (representing about 5.2% of Cameroon). Climatic conditions can be primarily divided into maritime and mountain. There is a wide disparity in the population of 1,361,981 persons (source: SOWEDA, 2010) with varied occupations and resources. The population density is 55 inhabitants per km2. There are six (06) administrative divisions and 32 sub divisions which are simple extensions of the State and enjoy neither financial nor legal autonomy and are dependent on the central government for all decisions. The division (Ndian) and Kombo Itindi council which is the subject of this report are located within the South West Region.

3.1.2. Ndian Division:

Ndian division is one of six administrative units that constitute the South West Region with its headquarters in Mundemba. Ndian has a surface area of 6,165km2 (25% of the region). The population (17% urban and 83% rural) in 2010 was 118,465 comprising 63,065 women and 55,399 men (source: SOWEDA projections) representing a population density of about 22 inhabitants per km2. This is largely due to the inaccessibility and the unfertile soils. The division covers a very low and indented point of contact with the sea. It has an amphibious area dominated by mangroves and creeks which make it difficult to penetrate and cannot be accessed by land. The use of creeks and canals as means of transport is not regular. Numerous sandbanks render access to sea difficult and limit movement only through small boats. There is no drinking water during the dry season coupled with the lack of drugs, food, schools and administrative offices make life difficult. There is a lot of marine erosion going on in the delta zone of the Ndian River and if nothing is done to check it, localities such as Ngosso and Barracks will soon disappear.

3.1.3. Kombo Itindi Council:

The council was created within the framework of Law number 77/203 of 19 June 1977 to setup councils and define their boundaries. In April 1995 a Presidential decree created Kombo Itindi municipality and clearly defined it as bordered to the north by Mundemba, to the south by Idabato and Bamusso, to the east by Ekondo Titi and to the west by Isangele. The council became operational in February 1996. Figures from the Bureau of Census and Population Studies indicate the population at two thousand nine hundred and fifty eight (2.958) inhabitants of whom there are 1.830 men and 1.128 women. Current council documents however indicate the total inhabitants to be 4.780 inhabitants. The reasons advanced by council management for this disparity include threats of insecurity that limited the counting as census agents did not exhaust coverage of Bakassi and settlers of Nigerian origin did not want to offer information. KIC has about five (05) inhabitants per km2 (source: South West Master Plan of MINEPAT/SOWEDA, 2004). The population is made up of tribes from Cameroon (Isangelle, Masaka, Oron, Bateka) and Nigeria (Obioio, Ijaw, Orong) who are mostly fishermen. 32 villages (most of them very small and uninhabited creeks) constitute the municipality with headquarters in Ngosso I. No government service effectively operates in Ngosso due to the insecurity prevalent in the area. All heads of Government Technical Services including the Divisional Officer, the treasurer, the forces of law and order, Inspector of Basic Education and Health Officers reside in Mundemba. The council operates a temporary office in Mundemba. Ngosso is simply a deserted village with little or no ongoing activity. On the contrary, Barracks which is the economic capital of the municipality has an effective resident population and a border market where fishing and general merchandise constitute the main commodities between traders and fishermen from Cameroon and Nigeria. Since becoming operational in February 1996, the council area has been administered by twelve (12) appointed Divisional Officers and one elected Mayor.

3.1.4. Historical Timeline

Dates Activity
21/12/1993 Nigerian soldiers invade Bakassi (Jabane and Diamond Island)
18/02/1994 Cameroonian soldiers put up resistance.
24 – 29/03/1994 President Paul Biya opts for diplomatic channels (United Nations, Organization of African Unity, International Court of Justice) to resolve the conflict.
April  1995 Creation of Kombo Itindi Council (KIC) within the Bakassi Peninsular
10/10/2002 International Court of Justice passes judgement in favour of Cameroon
12/06/2006 Cameroon and Nigeria sign the Greentree Accord concerning the modalities of withdrawal of Nigerian soldiers and transfer of authority in Bakassi to Cameroon.
14/08/2008 Nigeria withdraws her administration and police force signalling total transfer of Bakassi to Cameroon through lowering the Nigerian flag and hoisting the Cameroonian flag.

The Bakassi Commission and the Greentree Accord: KIC is one of five councils that constitute the Bakassi Peninsular which was fiercely contested through the use of arms and diplomacy by Cameroon and Nigeria during the period 1993 to 2006 when the Greentree Accord bringing peace and normalizing relations was signed. There is a Bakassi Commission lodged at level of the Prime Minister’s Office which spearheads all development projects within the peninsular. Among the several stipulations of the Greentree Acord, the GoC and by implication the KIC are committed to:

Not force Nigerian national (who constitute more than 90% of Kombo Itindi inhabitants) to leave the zone or change their nationality and respect their culture, language and beliefs.

Respect their rights to continue their agriculture and fishing activities.

Protect their property and their customary land rights.

Not levy in any discriminatory manner any taxes and other duties on Nigerian nationals. (KIC is not collecting any taxes until after 2013).

Take every necessary measure to protect Nigerian nationals from harassment and harm.

3.1.5. Description of the Biophysical Environment

Kombo Itindi municipality has a distinct biophysical environment surrounded by an evergreen mangrove ecosystem with high variety of biodiversity including birds and animal species. Accessibility to villages in the area is through the creeks or by high sea.  Most of the villages are located at 0m-5m above sea level with many swampy critical points due to the nature of the sea.

3.1.5.1. Climate

Kombo Itindi has distinct equatorial climatic conditions where Febrary is the hottest with an average temperature of 31.90C at midday while July is the coldest with an average temperature of 21.60C at night. September is the average month with the most of sun shine.The temperatures at night are cooler than during the day time. The wet season has an estimated rainfall of between 3,500 and 5000mm with the peak of rainfall around the month of August and the dry season is around the month of Febrary. This is characterized by dry winds that blow across the Sahara desert from the North East to a South Westerly direction.  During this period, daily temperatures are high with a slight drop in the night.

3.1.5.2. Soils

Sandy soils composed of muddy deposits id commonly found within the municipality. This soil type is not good for agricultutre and is subject to flooding which justifies fishing as the main occupation of the inhabitants.

3.1.5.3. Relief 

The Municipality has an undulating and a gentle relief with generally lowlands area. There are areas as low as 0m altitude at the sea level. The council has an average altitude of about 10m. Close to the Atlantic Ocean are the mangrove swamps, several creeks with white sand beaches that stretch to the Ndian River Basin.

3.1.5.4. Hydrology

The main water course in the council area is the sea including a few inland streams which are used for domestic activities and also periodically for drinking during the dry season.

 

2.2.  History and people of the council

2.2.1.   Ethnic Groups and inter-ethnic relations

About 95% of the inhabitants of Kombo Itindi municipality are of Nigerian ethnicity including the Ibiobios, Orons, Ijaws and less than 5% are of Cameroonian ethnicity including the Masakas and Batekas of Isangele. The entire population are fishermen who still co hablit with a high sense of mistrust as a result of the Bakassi war.

2.2.2.   Religion

Proximity of the council to the Federal Republic of Nigeria has facilitated the influx of several New Christian Religious Movements including the Full Gospel Mission, the Apostolic and the Assembly of God who are the predominant religious institutions that are involved in evangelization within the municipality.

2.2.3.  Mobility of the population

Migration into this part of the country is extremely low due to the highly risky nature of the area. The sea is rough and highly deserted creating a conducive environment for pirates who take advantage of unsuspecting travellers who are mostly traders or fishermen. The presence of a border market in Barracks also accounts for some movemants of humans and cargo in and out of the municipality.

2.2.4.  Size and structure of the population

Figures from the Bureau of Census and Population Studies indicate the total population of the Municipality stood at two thousand nine hundred and fifty eight (2.958) inhabitants of whom there are 1.830 men and 1.128 women. Current council documents however indicate the total inhabitants to be 4.782 inhabitants. The reasons advanced by council management for this disparity include threats of insecurity that limited the counting exercise as census agents did not exhaust coverage of Bakassi settlements where some settlers of Nigerian origin did not want to offer information. The municipality has an estimated five (05) inhabitants per km2 (source: South West Master Plan of MINEPAT/SOWEDA). The population is made up of tribes from Cameroon (Isangelle, Masako, Oron, Bateka) and Nigeria (Obioio, Ijaw, Orong) who are mostly fishermen. 32 villages (most of them very small and uninhabited creeks) constitute the municipality with headquarters in Ngosso I. Three of the 32 villages (New Jerusamlem, Suel and Authority) are uninhabited. There are very few government services operating in Ngosso due to the insecurity prevalent in the area.

Table 1: Population Densities by Age Group

Source: Village Survey, Aug. 2011

Fig 1: Population Distribution by Age Group

Age bracket Total Population
0—6 years 215
6—14 years 854
15—19 years 1057
20—34 years 2242
35—59 years 287
60+ years 127
Total 4,782

 

 

 

 

 

Fig 2: Population by Gender.

 Source: Village Survey, Aug. 2011

 

2.0. SUMMARY OF DIAGNOSTIC RESULTS

2.1.   SWOT Analysis of KIC

Strengths Weaknesses Opportunities Threats
Youthful and Committed Staff
  • No Municipal Treasurer
  • No clearly elaborated Job Descriptions for staff
  • Absence of Staff Meetings
  • Under Staffed with limited knowledge on Council Management
  • Limited training opportunities for council staffs
  • Untrained Councilors
  • Non Functional Council Standing Committees

(recently created in May 2011)

 Access to International Markets (Nigeria, Equitorial Guinea) Absence of basic Government Technical Services
  • Legal Entity with identified boundaries

 

  • No Effective Presence of the Council within the municipality
  • No Permanent Council Structures
  • Limited Delegation of Authority
  • Limited Flow of Information at all levels
  • Poor Filing System (No archives)
  • Absence of Basic Council Services such as Civil Status Registry and Hygiene & Sanitation
  • No Standard Operating Manuals and Procedures on Council Functioning
Availability of Touristic Potentials e.g. marine life, water travel & mangroves Limited collaboration between the council and government technical services
  • Regular Deliberations by Councilors

 

  • Poor Tax Base
  • Limited Cooperation between the Council and the business community

Limited exploitation resources potentials

Availability of Funding Partners e.g. FEICOM, PNDP Poor Tax base and Attitude of Nigerian population limits proper tax assessments and collection.
Regular remuneration of Council Staff (No salary arrears)
  • No permanent Council buildings
  • No council real estate

Non usage of data processing equipment

Possibilities for Decentralized cooperation with other maritime councils (Kombo Abedimo, Idabato,Bamusso, Idenau) High costs of Transportation for Council services
Available Standard Operating Procedures for Revenue Collections
  • Non collaboration with business community and other development actors within the municipality

No Policy for Public Private Partnerships within the municipality

Possibilities of Twinning with other Costal Councils in border countries High rate of Insecurity within the municipality
Available Data Processing equipment (computer & printer) Potentials to generate more taxes from Chinese Trawlers, transporters of Forest Products, Tollgates on sea transportation.
Good Relationships with the Supervisory Authority

 

Fig. 4: Organizational Structure of KIC

Source: Council Documents, Aug. /Sept. 2011

  • In reference to the above structure, it is easy to observe that Kombo Itindi Council is a very small institution which is not capable of handling the challenges of insecurity as well as render the huge workload that is required of local councils within the dispensation of decentralization. When compared to the standardardized council organizational structure proposed by the Supervisory Authority (MINATD), it is evident that the council urgently needs to build its capacity in several areas in order for it to play its pivotal role of fostering development within the municipality.

The deliberative organ of Kombo Itindi council comprises of twenty five (25) councillors; fourteen (14) women and eleven (11) who represent all thirty two (32) villages that constitute the municipality. The council has two permanent committees (Finance and All Purpose) which were recently created and have not been trained. The executive organ constitutes of the Mayor and the two deputies; the first deputy is a male while the second deputy Mayor is a woman.

The Secretary General is responsible for the overall coordination of the administrative and technical services of the council. He is the main collaborator of the council executive as well as with other technical services within the municipality. He is assisted by a Finance Clerk who is in charge of all financial records of the council. She also assists in keeping all financial records of tax payers, draw up budgets and administrative accounts of the council.  The Sub Treasurer (ST) is acting in the place of the Municipal Treasurer (MT).

Table: 4. Financial situation (budgeted) of the council between 2008 and 2010.

Fiscal Year Total Budget Re Current Expenditure Investment
2008

74.740.552 FCFA

52.318.389 FCFA

22.422.165 FCFA

2009

76.805.997 FCFA

52.383.382 FCFA

24.422.165 FCFA

2010

93.674.703 FCFA

53.674.578 FCFA

40.000.000 FCFA

Source: Council Documents, Aug. /Sept. 2011

A detailed look at the administrative (actual) accounts below reveals that the budget realization rates for 2008 was 10.2% and in 2009 and 2010 the rate stood at 12.3% and 12.2% respectively.This means that KIC has a very weak financial base which renders it incapable (on its own) of rendering basic services to its population.

General Situation

2008

2009

2010

Total Revenue

7.691.388 FCFA

9.449.159 FCFA

11.502.335 FCFA

Total expenditure

7.673.229 FCFA

8.933.229 FCFA

11.502.335 FCFA

Surplus

18.159 FCFA

513.460 FCFA

Source: Council Documents, Aug. /Sept. 2011

2.1.  Core Problems and Needs (4.3.) identified by Sectors

Sector

Core Problem

Causes

Effects

Needs

Livestock, Fisheries and Animal Husbandry Low  Fish production and  productivity

 

  • Poor fishing methods.
  • Insufficient fishing equipment.
  • Inappropriate processing and storage facilities
  • Insufficient assistance to fishermen
  • Unorganized sector
  • Unfair competition

 

  • Reduction in fish production
  • Destruction of fish/habitat
  • High exploitation of mangrove for  fish smoking
  • High rate of eye infections for fish smokers using  traditional methods of drying
  • Unsustainable harvesting of fish
    • Construct modern ovens
    • Organize fishing sector
    • Organize training on appropriate fishing methods
    • Provide  modern equipment to existing fishing groups
    • Initiate contacts with HPI Cameroon
Territorial Administration and Decentralization Weak  Local Administration
  • Non recognition & classification of traditional rulers as auxiliary of administration
  • Non resident administrative staff
  • Limited sensitization of the population
  • Harassements of the population by pirates
  • High rate of kidnappings by pirate
  • Refusal of transtered staff to reside in the municipality
    • Recognize, classify and compensate traditional rulers
    • Facilitate effective presence of administrative  staff
    • Sensitize population on residency and citizenship
Basic Education Limited access to quality Basic Education
  • Insufficient qualified teaching staff
  • Insufficient classrooms
  • Insufficient latrines and water points in schools
  • Limited classrooms, equipment and furniture
  • Absence  of nursery schools
  • Limited access to didactic materials (pupils and teachers)
  • No play grounds

 

  • Low scolarisation rate
  • High illitracy rate
  • Juvenile delinquency
  • High rate of prostitution
  • Drop in school performance
  • Construct  additional classrooms
  • Lobby for the recruitment of qualified teaching personnel
  • Supply didactic materials and other school needs
  • Equip schools (pupil desks, tables, chairs for teachers)
  • Construct  water points, latrines, fences, libraries and recreational amenities to schools
Secondary Education Limited access to quality Secondary Education
  • Limited classrooms with furniture
  • Insufficient qualified teaching staff
  • Limited access to didactic materials
  • Absence of a  functional school library
  • Absence  of  latrines and water points in schools
  • Few non academic activities and recreational facilities
  • No high school
  • Low scolarisation rate
  • High rate of illitracy
  • Juvenile delinquency
  • Limited socio-professional insertion of youths
  • High rate of prostitution
  • Low performance  in public exams
  • High School drop out
  • Rural exodus
  • Lobby for the creation of  a technical schools in the municipality
  • Construct  additional classrooms in school
  • Lobby for the transfer of qualified teaching personnel
  • Supply didactic materials and other school needs
  • Equip schools with furniture (desks, tables, chairs for teachers, etc.)
  • Construct water points, latrines, fences, libraries and recreational amenities
Environment, Nature Protection and Sustainable Development High rate of Environmental degradation
  • Unprotected coast lines
  • Poor management of natural resources
  • Poor disposal of human and household waste
  • High rate of exploitation mangroves for fish smoking
  • High rate of water pollution by hydro carbon substances
  • High rate of erosion
  • Increase in global warming
  • Increase in pollution
  • Loss of species
  • Low fish catch
  • Drop in house hold income
  • Low standards of living
  • Sensitize on alternative methods for fish smoking
  • Educate on sustainable harvesting  of mangroves
  • Sensitize on waste disposal
  • Initiate contacts with Bgosso oil Drilling Company

 

 

Public Health Limited access to quality Health care
  • · Insufficient qualified medical personnel
  • · Limited health coverage of the council area
  • · Insufficient health equipment
  • · Limited access to essential drugs
  • · Unhealty cultural practices
  • · Poor disposal of human waste
  • · Poor drainage systems
  • · Long distance of travel  for health care
  • · Poorly maintained surroundings
  • · High cost for health care
  • · High prevalence of diseases
  • · High rate of infant mortality
  • · Automedication
  • · High rate of rural exodus
  • · Drop in labour force
  • · Drop in per capital income
  • · High death rate
  • · Poor living standards
  • · Recruit more Qualified medical personnel
  • · Sensitize on basic hygiene
  • · Equip health centers (beds, refrigerators, laboratory equipment, staff lodging etc.)
  • · Organize Trainings and seminars on health issues
  • · Intensify Community outreach programmes
  • · Initiate contacts with Ngosso oil Drilling Company
Energy Poor access to Electricity supply
  • No  access to electricity supply
  • No  functional thermal electricity plant
  • None functional community generator
  • Poorly mobilized communities

 

  • High rate of insecurity
  • High expenditure on fuel for personal generators
  • Reduced economic activities
  • Difficult usage of electrical appliances
  • Difficult access and usage of new technologies
  • Difficulties to study or work at night
  • Mobilize for community electricity scheme
  • Lobby for support of community electricity scheme
  • Initiate contacts with Ngosso oil Drilling Company
Arts and Culture High  deterioration rate ofcultural values
  • No Council policy to promote culture
  • Absence of annual cultural festivals
  • Absence of protected shrines
  • Absence of community halls
  • Poor community mobilization

 

  • Loss of cultural values
  • No cultural contribution in the economic growth of the families and the communities
  • Influx of foreign cultural values
  • Construct community halls in critical villages
  • Organize annual cultural jamborees
  • Provide scholarships on cultural values
Water  Poor access to potable water
  • No access to potable water.
  • Consuption of Poorly treated  water sources
  • Poorly mobilized communities
  • High prevalence of water borne diseases
  • High expenditures  on water (pure water from neighbouring Nigeria)
  • Construct boreholes in all critical villages
  • Initiate feasibility studies
Tourism and Leisure Non exploitation of  tourist potentials
  • No council policy on tourism
  • No promotion of tourism
  • No support from the central government
  • Lost income potentials to the council
  • Poor image of Bakassi area
  • Limited Pro Poor tourism activities.
  • Develop Tourism Policy
  • Identify Tourist sites
  • Secure partnerships to rehabilitate tourist sites
  • Organize annual cultural jamboree
 Agriculture and Rural Development Low agricultural production and productivity
  • Insufficient training of producers
  • Insufficient technical personnel
  • Low fertility of the soil
  • Weak organisational and financial capacity of producers
  • Limited access to improved planting materials and agricultural inputs
  • Low  revenue
  • Poor living standards
  • Limited intake of starch and vegetables
  • Low harvest
  • Rural Exodus
  • Hogh expenditure on feeding
  • Provide agricultural inputs (fertilizer)
  • Reclaim land for agriculture
  • Train on farming in marshy and wet lands
  • Initiate contacts with Ngosso oil Drilling Company
State Property and Land Tenue High insecurity of state property
  • Absence of title deeds for state and private property
  • Cultural limitations
  • Poor community sensitisation on the importance of land titles
  • Limited Settler motivation
  • Illegal possession and occupants of land
  • Conflict between communities
  • Sensitize population on land issues.
  • Facilitate access to title deeds.
Housing and Urban Development   Poor Town Planning
  • Absence of Town Planning Policy at local level
  • Absence of Town planning service in the council
  • Haphazard construction of houses
  • Absence of waste management plan
  • Construction of housing using local and temporal materials
  • Low  financial capacity of the population
  • Insecurity of occupied land
  • Environmental pollution and  poor waste disposal
  • High rate of water borne diseases
  • High rate of fire disasters
  • High rate of promiscuity
  • Develop Town planning policy (Municipal Order)
  • Put in place Town planning service in KIC
  • Facilitate access to construction and building materials/equipment
Forestory and Wildlife  High rate of Deforestation
  • Illegal exploitation of the  amangrove forests
  • Insufficient administrative control measures
  • Poor knowledge of Forestry Laws
  • Illegal poaching/hunting of animal species
  • Destruction of biodiversity
  • Climate change
  • Disappearance of marine life
  • Increase the number of technical staff in the forestry post
  • Sensitisation on the forestry laws
  • Initiate contacts with Ngosso oil Drilling Company
Higher Education Inaccessibility to higher education facilities
  • Absence of   professional education facilities
  • Insufficient financial means of parents
  • Difficult access to socio-professional training
  • High educational fees
  • Abandonment of studies
  • Juvenile delinquency
  • Under-development
  • Insufficient number of educated elites
  • Offer scholarships to youths who have completed secondary education
  • Implant Professional School for Fisheries
Public Works High rate of floods
  • Poor drainage system
  • No embarkment around coastlines

 

  • Soil erosion resulting in soil infetility
  • Increased environment for mosquito breeding.
  • Destruction of property
  • Construct embarkment
  • Initiate contacts with OSRI
Social Affairs Insufficient social services and empowerment of vulnerable persons
  • Non existence of a data base of vulnerable persons
  • Absence of social centre and other infrastructure
  • None existence of social workers
  • No assistance to vulnerable population
  • Psychological trauma
  • Juvenile delinquency
  • Construct social centre
  • Recruit social workers to be at their disposal and to offer psycho-social assistance to them when need be
  • Establish lists of vulnerables.
  • Initiate contacts with REACHOUT Cameroon
Women Empowerment and the Promotion of the Family Marginalisation of women and children
  • Absence of social structures
  • Insufficient and inadequate social facilities
  • Weak economic power of women
  • Insufficient and inadequate representation and participation of women in development and political issues
  • Ignorance of women on their rights
  • Under scholarisation of the girl child
  • Absence of  gender policy
  • Insufficient opportunities for the women and the girl child
  • High dependence of women on the men
  • High prevalence rate of the child-mother phenomenon (pikin born pikin)
  • High prevalence rate of abandoned children
  • Rural exodus
  • High prevalence rate of early girl child marriages
  • Ignorance on gender equality issues
  • Mobilize and sensitize on gender equality and related topics
  • Train administrative, traditional and council authorities on gender mainstreaming
  • Creat & Equip Home Economics Center in Barracks.
  • Sensitize and train on women’s rights and the family
  • Train and support women on income generating activities
  • Initiate contacts with REACH OUT, Cameroon
Youth and Citizen Education Insufficient youth empowerment facilities and programmes
  • Insufficient trainers and youth animators
  • Limited entrepreneural capacities
  • Limited access to funding youth interests
  • High illiteracy rate
  • Absence of youth empowerment structures and services
  • Limited mobilization of youths on income generating activities
  • High rate of unemployment
  • High illitracy rate
  • Juvenile  delinquency
  • High rate of teenagers pregnancies
  • Early marriages
  • High prevalence and spread of STIs
  • High rate of rural exodus
  • Increase sensitization of youths on different opportunities available
  • Create  functional youth empowerment centres
  • Recruit youth trainers and animators
Sports and Phisical Education Insufficient  sporting activities
  • Insufficient sporting activities
  • Insufficient sport equipment in schools
  • Insufficient sport teachers in the different schools
  • Low rate of physical exercise
  • Poor development of sports and leisure disciplines
  • Absence of sport organisations
  • Insufficient  sport competitions
  • Construct a sports complex
  • Institute Proper management of the available sports facilities
  • Employ sport teachers in schools
  • Organize local  sporting activities
Transport Poor Enforcement of  Maritime Transport Policy
  • Non respect of transport rules (use of life jacket)
  • Poor state of  engine boats  used for transportation
  • Overloading of transport  boats
  • Insufficient transport boats and engines
  • High rate of insecurity of sea transport
  • High rate of accidents
  • High cost of transport
  • High costs of basic foodstuffs
  • Institute maritime transport policy (Municipal Order)
  • Sensitize population on maritime transportation
Employment and Vocational Training High rate of unemployment
  • Absence of a vocational training center
  • Insufficient  employment opportunities
  • High illitracy rate
  • Absence of professional training for potential job seekers
  • Absence of professional training schools
  • High rate of illegal activities
  • Juvenile delinquency
  • High crime wave
  • Early marriages
  • Construct SAR-SM
  • Construct professional training centre for the youths
  • Support youths with seed capital
Small and Medium Size Entreprises, Social Economy and Handicraft  Poor development of economic activities
  • Absence of structures and facilities
  • Limited access to services
  • Slow and weak promotion of the sector
  • Limited opportunities for youths (mechanics, tailoring, panel beating/welding etc)
  • Low capacity and skills of the population
  • Clandestine businesses
  • High taxes for existing entreprises
  • Weak economic power of the population and the council
  • Insufficient revenue collection and diversification strategies
  • Creation and institution of functional facilities
  • Sensitize on small and medium size entreprises services
Scientific Research and Innovation Limited access to research instruments
  • Absence of research facilities (structures, personnel, equipment)
  • Poor dissemination of scientific innovations
  • Poor policy formulation and programming by the state with petroleum companies
  • Absence of government will
  • Absence of informations on agropastoral innovations
  • Absence of improved planting materials
  • Poor promotion of sectoral activities
  • Low quality of livestock produce
  • Rudimentary production technics
  • Poor production
  • Low revenues
  • High poverty rates
  • Train local community researchers
  • Institute Research Center
  • Award of best innovative research projects
Industry, Mines and Technological Development Poor Development of the Industrial  sector
  • None availability of daba base on research carried out on possible sector potentials
  • Absence of trainings
  • Absence of mining industries

 

  • Poor conception of development plans
  • Over exploitaton of resources
  • None financing of micro projects by companies
  • Weak economic power of the council and population
  • High rate of poverty in the communities
  • Provide Data base of existing minerals within the municipality.
  • Organize a Kombo Itindi Development Conference
  • Initiate Bakassi Development Conference
  • Initiate contacts with Oil Drilling Companies operating in the area
Commerce Poor diversification of commercial activities
  • Insufficient market facilities
  • Poor information on prices of goods in other areas
  • Poor road network
  • Insecurity of users and operators
  • High price speculation on products
  • Weak and insufficient revenue
  • Risk of diseases and loss of goods
  • Exploitation of the communities by traders (buyam-sellam11)
  • Construct modern periodic market in Esu
  • Improve on Market in Barracks Information Systems
  • Support Vigilante Surveys
  • Initiate contacts with Oil companies operating in the area
Post and Telecommunications  Difficult access to information and postal services
  • · Poor access to Cameroonian TV and radio signals
  • · Poor Mobile Telecommunication network
  • · Absence of Community radio station
  • · Population is less informed on Cameroon
  • · Foreign stations are the main sources of information
  • · Reduced allegiance to Cameroon
  • · Difficulties in communicating with persons in and out of the community
  • · Install  CRTV network antennas
  • · Establish a Bakassi community radio
Labour and Social Security High rate of Job insecurity
  • Insufficient number of stabilised entreprises and organisations
  • Poor organisation and structuring of self employment
  • High taxes
  • Poor sensitisation
  • Poor participation in development activities
  • High rate of poverty
  • High rate of rural exodus
  • Attract enterprises in the municipality
  • Sensitize on the rights of the employee
Public Security High rate of insecurity
  • Insufficient security staff
  • Non resident security staff
  • No permanent security offices
  • Refusal of transferred staff to reside in the municipality
  • Harassment of the population by pirates
  • High crime wave
  • Construct Police Post
  • Increase security staff
  • Construct houses for security staff
  • Sensitize security personnel on the Greentree Accord
Communication Poor communication networks
  • Poor access to Cameroon TV and Radio signals
  • Poor lobbying capacity
  • No community radio
  • Poor initiation of community radio project
  • Poor circulation of newspapers
  • No newspaper agents
  • Poor circulation of information
  • Limited access to development programmes
  • Limited access to world events
  • Install CRTV antenna
  • Create community radio
  • Install news paper vendors


 2.2. Table of priority projects in the key Social Sectors per village

(villages which have similar ranking of their priority projects per

sector have been grouped together).

Villages Sector Micro-projects in order of priority Estimated Costs (before FS)
Barracks   Energy  and Water Install thermal electricity plant

 24.000.000

Install water scheme

9.000.000

Public Health Equip the health centre with essential drugs and equipment

8.000.000

Basic Education Equipment and furniture (pupil desks, table and chairs for teachers)

56.300.000

Secondary Education Renovate GSS and supply of didactic materials

28.000.000

Commerce Activate Border market

10.000.000

Environment Construct Environment Post

10.000.000

Transport Enforce maritime laws

20.000.000

Public works Construction of embankments

200.000.000

Ngosso I, II & III Energy  and Water Install thermal electricity plant

24.000.000

Install water scheme

27.000.000

Environment Construct Environment Post

10.000.000

Transport Enforce maritime laws

20.000.000

Public Works Build  embankment to reduce coastal degradation and flood

200.000.000

Basic Education Equipment and furniture (pupil desks, table’s chairs for teachers, etc.)

2.050.000

Secondary Education Construct GSS and supply of didactic materials

38.000.000

Public Health Supply of basic health equipment and drugs

20.000.000

Isu Public Health Construction of a  health centre and   public toilets

40.000.000

Basic Education Supply didactic materials

17.800.000

Water and Energy Install water scheme

9.000.000

Install thermal electricity plant

38.500.000

Public Works Build  embankment to reduced coastal degradation and flood

20.000.000

Transport Enforce maritime laws

20.000.000

Commerce Construction of a modern periodic market

20.000.000

Gold Coast (Oche Iwake Osuk) Culture Construction of a community hall for cultural manifestation

10.000.000

Water and Energy Construction of a water scheme with gravity

15.000.000

Install thermal electricity plant

38.500.000

Basic Education Construct 4 additional classrooms in GS and supply of didactic materials and teachers tables and chairs

76.500.000

 Public Health Construct and equip  health centre

20.000.000

Transport Enforce maritime laws

20.000.000

Public Works Construct embankment

26.000.000

Njat I,II Water and Energy Construction of stand pipes

29.500.000

Install thermal electricity plant

38.500.000

Public Health Construct health center and equip   with basic essential  drugs

50.000.000

Basic Education Construct classrooms and supply of didactic materials

50.000.000

Public Works Construct embankment

12.000.000

Transport Enforce maritime laws

20.000.000

Commerce Construction of a modern periodic market

20.000.000

Kombo Adibo I & II Energy  and Water Install thermal electricity plant

24.000.000

Install water scheme

10.000.000

 Public Health Construct and equip  health centre

20.000.000

Basic Education Construct classrooms and supply of didactic materials

50.000.000

Public Works Construct embankment

12.000.000

Transport Enforce maritime laws

20.000.000

Environment Construct Environment Post

10.000.000

Iwaha Njat I, II Public Health Construction  and equip  health centre

20.000.000

Energy Install thermal electricity plant

38.500.000

Water Install water scheme

10.000.000

Public Works Construct embankment

6.000.000

Basic Education Construction of additional 3 classrooms and supply with teacher desks

24.000.000

Culture Construction of a community hall for cultural manifestation

10.000.000

Transport Enforce maritime laws

20.000.000

Commerce Construction of a modern periodic market

20.000.000

Oboh Affeh Water and Energy Install water schemes

27.000.000

Install thermal electricity plant

38.500.000

Public Health Construction of health center

26.000.000

Public Works Construct embankment

30.000.000

Culture Construction of a community hall for cultural manifestations

10.000.000

Useh Uyoh Water rand Energy Install water scheme

25.000.000

Install thermal electricity plant

50.000.000

 Public Health Construction of health centre and equipped   with basic essential  drugs

20.000.000

Transport Enforce maritime laws

20.000.000

Public Works Construct embankment

30.000.000

New Barracks Public Works Construct embankment

46.000.000

Water and Energy Supply  of a potable water scheme

50.000.000

Install thermal electricity plant

38.500.000

Transport Enforce maritime laws

20.000.000

Public Health Construction of health centre

26.000.000

New Kombo I & II Water  and Energy Supply of  pipe borne  water scheme by gravity

15.000.000

Install thermal electricity plant

38.500.000

Culture Construction of a community hall for cultural manifestation

5.000.000

Public Works Construct embankment

16.000.000

Commerce Creation and construction of modern  periodic market structure

20.000.000

Environment Construct Environment Post

10.000.000

Transport Enforce maritime laws

20.000.000

Culture Construct a community hall for cultural manifestation

10.000.000

Ewondo,Water Creek,Oichere Atire Okoso, Useh Usang Public Health Construction  and equip  health centre

20.000.000

Energy Install thermal electricity plant

38.500.000

Public Works Construct embankment

6.000.000

Basic Education Institute a primary school

100.000.000

Culture Construction of a community hall for cultural manifestation

10.000.000

Commerce Construction of a modern periodic market

20.000.000

Transport Enforce maritime laws

20.000.000

Environment Construct Environment Post

10.000.000

Water Supply  of a potable water scheme

50.000.000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


5.2. LOGICAL FRAMEWORK BY SECTOR

PUBLIC SECURITY :

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Peaceful environment enhanced within the municipality At least 80% of the population lead a peaceful life yearly –          Testimonies-          Security reports –    Pirate harassment reduced
Specific objective Security increased Crime wave reduced by at least 60% by 2015 –          Testimonies-          Security reports –    Security officers resident in the municipality
Results 1. Security staff increased At least 80 security staff in place and functional yearly –          Security reports-          Testimonies –    Favourable policy framework
2. Security staff permanently in place All security staff reside in the municipality by 2013 and maintain peace and order –          Security reports-          Testimonies –    Favourable policy framework

TERRITORIAL ADMINISTRATION AND DECENTRALISATION :

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Harmonous  relationship between  traditional rulers and local administration increased By 2015 at least 80% of population actively participates in development activities. –          Testimonies-          Realized project reports –          Solidarity of community members ensured
Specific objective Local administration strengthened By 2014 at least 80% of traditional rulers lead their communities and conflicts reduce by at least 10% –          Testimonies-          Case files –          Favourable political climate
Results 1. Control over the population increased At least 80% of population respect laws governing the communities yearly –          Case files-          Administrative Reports –          Favourable political climate
2. Recognition of traditional rulers increased At least 60% of traditional rulers recognized and classified by 2015 –          Testimonies-          Administrative Reports Favourable political climate

 

LIVESTOCK :

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Nutritional condition of the population improved By 2015 malnutrition cases reduced by at least 10% –       Health centre reports-       Administrative records Nutritional foodstuff available
Specific objective Livestock production and productivity increased Conventional and non conventional (snails) livestock increase by at least 20% 2015 –       Farm visits-       Testimonies Diversification of eating habits ensured
Results 1. Interest of the population in livestock production increased By 2014 at least 20 of the population keep pigs, poultry, snails etc –        Farm visits-       Administrative reports Enabling economic conditions
2.  Access to livestock production increased At least 50% of livestock farmers have access to improved breeds, feed and drugs yearly –       Farm records-       Reports Enabling economic conditions
3.  Knowledge in livestock production increased At least 70% of livestock farmers manage their farms and increase production yearly –       Farm records-       Administrative reports Epidemics reduced

 FISHERIES :

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Nutritional condition of the population improved By 2015 malnutrition of least 50% of the population  reduced by at least 40% –       Health centre reports-       Testimonies Favourable political environment
Specific objective Fish production and productivity increased By 2015 fish production increased by at least 20% –       Administrative reports-       Observations Favourable economic and political environment
Results 1. Fishing methods improved At least 40% of fishermen and women use improved fishing methods –        Visits-       Administrative reports Enabling economic conditions
2. Fishing equipment increased By 2013 at least 30% of fishermen and women use improved fishing equipment –       Observations-       Reports Enabling economic environment
3.  Competition from trawlers reduced By 2013 at least 30% of fishermen and women increase their harvest by at least 5% –       Testimonies-       Reports Favourable policy framework
4. Processing and storage facilities improved By 2013 at least 4 chokor ovens and  4 ice plants are constructed and used –       Visit-       Administrative report Enabling economic conditions
5.  Organization of the fishery sector improved By 2013 at least 5 fish associations is created and functional –       Reports Collaboration of fishermen and women ensured

BASIC EDUCATION :

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Global objective Basic Education Literacy rate reduced At least 30% of children between the ages of 10 and 13 can read and write by 2015 –          Testimonies-          F.S.L.C-          Administrative reports –          Security ensured
Specific objective Access to quality basic education increased At least 60% of children in primarily six obtain FLSC yearly by 2015 –          F.S.L.C results-          Testimonies-          Administrative reports –          Security ensured
Results 1. Qualified teachers increased All primary schools have at least 6 functional teachers by 2014 –          Transfer decisions-          Administrative reports –          Favourable policy framework
  2. Classrooms increased By 2015, all the schools have at least four classrooms –          Visit-          Administrative report Enabling economic conditions
  3.  Latrines and water points increased All schools have 1 latrine and 1 water point by 2014 –          Visit-          Administrative report Enabling economic conditions
  4.  Equipment increased (desks, tables) By 2015 all the classrooms  have at least 20 benches 1 table and 1 chair in all the schools –          Visit-          Inventory list Enabling economic conditions
  5. Access to didactic material increased Didactic materials are evenly distributed to all the schools each year –          Distribution least-          Administrative report Enabling economic conditions

SECONDARY EDUCATION :

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Global objective Literacy rate increased at the secondary level At least 30% of children between the ages of 12 and 18 can read and write by 2015 –          Administrative reports-          Testimonies Security ensured
Specific objective Access to quality secondary education increased By 2015 at least 40% of students in class five  pass in at least 4 “O” level papers –          GCE ‘O’ level results-          Administrative report Enabling economic conditions
 Results 1. Qualified teachers increased By 2015 at least 6 functional qualified teachers in place –          Transfer decision-          Administrative report Favourable policy framework
2. Classrooms increased By 2014 at least 2 classrooms are constructed at GSS barracks –          Site visit-          Administrative reports Enabling economic conditions
3. Latrines and water points in schools increased By 2014, I latrine and 1 water point constructed and used –          Site visit-          Administrative report Enabling economic conditions
4.  Equipment increased (desks, tables, chairs) By 2014, all the classrooms in GSS Barracks are equipped with desk tables and chairs –          Visit-          Inventory list-          Administrative report Enabling economic conditions
5. Library put in place 1 library constructed and functional in GSS barracks by 2015 –          Visit administrative report Enabling economic conditions

ENVIRONMENT, NATURE PROTECTION AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT :

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Management of natural resources improved At least 20% of natural resources are sustainably managed by 2015 –          Visits-          Administrative reports Favourable economic and political environment
Specific objective Environmental degradation reduced By 2015 pollutions reduced by at least 25% yearly –          Visits-          Administrative reports – Collaborative community and industrial companies
Results 1. Protection of Coastlines improved At least 40% of  functional coastlines have embankments –          Visits Administrative reports – Enabling economic conditions
2.  Disposal of human and household waste improved At least 20% of households own and use toilets and household waste regularly disposed by 2015. –          Visits-          Administrative reports collaborative Community
3.  Exploitation of mangrove for fish smoking reduced By 2015, at least 20% of fish smokers use improved fish ovens for smoking –           Visit fish smokers-          Administrative reports – Respect of environmental laws ensured
4. Water pollution by hydrocarbon substances reduced Water pollution reduced by at least 10% yearly –          Site visits-          Administrative reports – Collaboration of industrial oil companies

PUBLIC HEALTH :

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Health status improved By 2015 at least 50% of the population spend less 20% of their income on drugs –          Testimonies-          Health centre record –          Epidemics reduced
Specific objective Access to quality health care improved By 2015 at least 40% of the population have access to health services –          Testimonies-          Health centre records –          Superstition reduced-          Enabling economic conditions
Results 1. Qualified medical staff increased By 2014 at least 4 functional qualified staff exist in 2 health centres in Ngosso 1 and Barracks –          Transfer decisions-          Administrative reports –          Favourable policy framework-          Staff are motivated
2.  Health coverage of the council area increased By 2014, an outreach programme is designed and implemented to cover all the municipality –          Designed programme-          Administrative report Security ensured
3.  Access to essential drugs increased At least two functional pro pharmacies in place and regularly stock with essential drugs, by 2014 –          Visit-          Testimonies Favourable policy framework
4.  Health equipment increased By 2014, two health centres are equipped with beds, delivery kits and beds, laboratory equipment etc and used –          Visit-          Administrative reports –          Enabling economic conditions-          Qualified staff in place

ENERGY :

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Living standards increased By 2015, economic activities increase by at least 25% each year –          Visits-          Council reports –          Favourable economic and political climate
Specific objective Access to electricity supply increased At least 40% of the population use electricity daily by 2015 –          Visits-          Councils Reports –          Enabling economic conditions
Results 1. Thermal electricity plants made available and functional Thermal electricity plants installed and regularly used in Ngosso I & Barracks by 2013 –          Visits-          Administrative Reports –          Enabling economic conditions
2.  Community generators increased By 2015, Functional communities generators exist in at least 10 communities and regularly maintained –          Visits-          Administrative Reports Community collaboration

 WATER :

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Water borne diseases reduced Water borne diseases reduce by at least 50% by 2015 –          Testimonies-          Health centers records –          Enabling economic environment
Specific objective Access to potable water increased At least 60% of the population drink potable water by 2015 –          Testimonies-          Administrative Reports –          Favourable policy framework
Results 1. Functional potable water schemes increased At least 10 potable schemes constructed and functional  in 10 villages –          Visit-          Administrative Reports –          Enabling economic environment-          Collaborative communities

TOURISM  AND LEISURE :  

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Revenue from the tourism sector for the council  increased Revenue increased by at least 20% yearly from tourism by 2015 –          Council accounts records-          Testimonies –          Security ensured
Specific objective Exploitation of tourism potentials increased By 2015 at least 100 tourists visit the municipality yearly –          Administrative reports-          testimonies Security ensured
Results 1. Council policy on tourism made available By 2013 a council policy on tourism is developed and applied –          council policy on tourism –          favourable policy framework
2.  Developed tourist sites increased By 2014 the white sandy beaches, sea creeks, virgin mangrove, vegetation sites are developed and attract tourists –          site visits-          Administrative report Enabling economic environment
3.  Tourism infrastructures increased (hotel, restaurant) By 2014 at least one standard hotel and restaurant exist and functional –          Visit to the hotel-          Administrative report Enabling economic environment

 

 ARTS AND CULTURE : 

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Awareness on Cultural values increased By 2015 at least 30% of the population respect cultural values –          Testimonies-          Administrative reports Security ensured
Specific objective Promotion of cultural values increased By 2015, cultural values of the municipality are known and documented –          Documented cultural values Favourable economic and political environment
Results 1. Council policy to promote culture made available By 2013 a policy on culture is in place and applied –          Policy on culture-          administrative reports –          Favourable policy framework
2.  Cultural festivals increased By 2013 at least  2 cultural festivals are organized yearly –          Testimonies-          Administrative  reports Collaboration of all stakeholder ensured
3. Community halls and museum increased By 2015 at least 2 community halls and museum put in place –          Administrative reports-          visit Enabling economic conditions
4. Community mobilization improved At least 60% of the population actively participate in cultural festivals yearly –           Observations-          Administrative reports –          Solidarity of community members

 AGRICULTURE AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT:

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Global objective Production of high quality foodstuff  increased At least 50% of the population have access to quality food stuff by 2014 –          Home visits-          Reports Exportation of foodstuff  to neigbouring countries reduced
Specific objective Production of food crops increased By 2015, foodcrop production increase by at least 25% –          Observations-          Testimonies-          Administrative reports Favourable climatic conditions
Results 1. Technical knowledge increased At least 30% of farmers use improved technology each cropping season by 2015. –          Observations-          Testimonies-          Administrative reports Favourable climatic conditions
2. Soils improved By 2015, at least four food crops are grown with high yields each year –          Report-          Farm records Favourable climatic conditions
3.  Organization of producers improved By 2014, 25 functional common initiative groups exist –          Reports-          Registered CIGs Solidarity increased
4. Access to improved planting materials increased At least 30% of farmers, use improved planting materials –          Reports-          Observations Timely availability of planting materials

STATE PROPERTY AND LAND TENURE: 

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Global objective Security of state and private property increased. At least 30% of state property and land are properly maintained each year –          Site visits-          Administrative report –          Favourable policy framework
Specific objective Legal possession and occupation of land increased By 2015 at least 30% of state property and land are legally possessed –          Legal documents-          Administrative reports –          Favourable policy framework
Results 1. Title deeds for state and private land  increased By 2015 at least 20% of state property and land have land titles. –          Land title documents-          Administrative reports Cooperative population
2. Cultural limitations reduced Cultural limitations reduced by at least 10% by 2015 –            Testimonies-          Reports Cooperative population

HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT:

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Master plan for the municipality developed At least 2 major towns in the municipality have master plans by 2015 –          Visit-          Administrative reports Enabling economic and political environment
Specific objective Town planning improved By 2015, the towns of Ngoso 1 and Barracks are well presented with streets –          Visit-          Administrative reports Favourable policy framework
Results 1. Master plans of the municipality made available Master plans of Ngoso 1 and Barracks put in place and used by 2013 –          Master plan Collaboration between council and urban development service ensured
2.  Construction of houses using permanent materials increased At least 20% of the houses in the municipality are permanent structures by 2015 –          Visits-          Administrative reports Collaboration of communities ensured
3.  Haphazard building of houses reduced At least 30% of the population construct their houses with building permits by 2015 –          Visits-          Building permits Collaboration of communities ensured

FORESTRY AND WILDLIFE: 

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Destruction of biodiversity reduced By 2015, destruction of biodiversity reduce by at least 5% –          Administrative report-          Visits to forest –          Favourable policy framework
Specific objective Deforestation reduced By 2015 at least 20% of the population sustainably manage forest resources –          Site visits-          Administrative report –          Community collaboration
Results 1. Exploitation of mangroves for fish smoking reduced At least 30% of fish smokers use improved fish smoking ovens by 2015 –          Administrative report-          Visits to forest –          Community collaboration
2. Implementation of forestry law increased At least 20% of forestry laws applied in the municipality by 2015 –          Administrative report-          visits –          Conflict reduced

HIGHER EDUCATION:

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall Objective Number of professional institutions  increased At least 1 professional institution exist in the municipality by 2015 -Testimonies-Reports Favourable policy framework
Specific Objective Access to quality higher education increased At least 5% of youths obtain Diplomas and degrees by 2015 -Certificates-Reports Favourable policy framework
Results              1. Access to professional schools increased At least 15% of youths are admitted into professional schools by 2015 -Admission letters Favourable policy framework
2. Higher professional schools in the division increased At least 1 professional school created  by 2015 -Visit-Reports Favourable policy framework

PUBLIC WORKS

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Environmental degradation reduced Environmental degradation reduce by at least 20% by 2015 –          Visit-          Administrative reports Security ensured
Specific objective Rate of floods reduced Floods reduce by at least 10% yearly –          Visit-          Administrative reports-          Testimonies Security ensured
Results 1. Drainage systems improved By 2015, culvert, gutters are constructed and functional –          Administrative reports-          Visits Security ensured
2. Embankment along the coastline increased Embankments are constructed along the main coastline by 2015 –          Visits-          Administrative reports Favourblae economic environment

SOCIAL AFFAIRS:

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Empowerment of vulnerable  persons increased At least 20% of vulnerable persons are socially empowered by 2015 Administrative reports.Testimonies Favourable policy framework
Specific objective Social services to vulnerable person increased By 2015 at least 30% of vulnerable persons have access to social services Administrative   Reports.Testimonies Favourable policy framework
Results     1. Social facilities  increased By 2015 at least 1 social centre exist and functional – Visits- Administrative Reports Enabling economic environment
2. Social workers increased By 2013, at least 2 qualified social workers are in place and provide services regularly -Transfer decision-Administrative report Favourable policy framework
3. Social benefits increased By 2015 at least 20% of vulnerable groups receive social benefits annualy -Administrative reports-Testimonies Social benefits evenly distributed

WOMEN EMPOWERMENT AND THE PROMOTION OF THE FAMILY:

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Empowerment of women socially, economically, culturally, politically and personally At least 50% of women are involved in various economic, cultural, social and political activities by 2015. – Testimonies- Administrative reports Negative cultural practices against women reduced.
Specific objective Marginalization of women and girls At least 50% of women take decisions that favour them and their children by 2014 – Administrative reports-  Testimonies Male domination reduced
Results 1. Education of  women and girls increased At least 50% of girls in the municipality enroll in schools at all levels each year by 2015. School enrollment register Early marriage of the girl child reduced
2. Representation and participation of women in development and political issues increased. By 2015, at least 50% of members in development and political committees are women List of members in various committees Male domination reduced
3. Knowledge of women on their rights increased At least 50% of women know their rights and apply them by 2015 – Testimonies-  Administrative Reports Negative traditional practices against women reduced.
4. Economic power of women increased. Income level of at least 50% of women increase by at least 50% by 2015 –          Testimonies-          Business records Enabling economic conditions

YOUTH AND CITIZEN EDUCATION:

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall Objective Awareness on youthful living and civic  responsibilities increased At least 50% of youths are living responsible lives by 2015 -Testimonies-Visit to jobsites-Reports Favorable economic climate
Specific Objectives Youth empowerment facilities and programmes increased By 2013, realistic youth programmes are drawn up and implemented yearly in conducive environments -Youth programmes-Administrative reports Favourable policy framework
Results Trainers and youth animators increased By 2013 at least 2 functional youths animators are in place and functional -Transfer decisions-Administrative reports Favourable policy framework
Youth empowerment structures and services increased By 2014 at least 1 youth animation centre is constructed and functional -Visits-Administrative reports Favourable policy framework
Mobilization of youths on income generating activities increased At least 20% of youths operate gainful businesses by 2014 -Visit to business places-Council reports Favourable business climate

SPORTS AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION:

 

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Importance attached to Physical education increased At least 50% of the population carry out physical exercises at least  once a week by 2014 – Testimonies- Reports Enthusiasm of population
Specific objective Sporting activities increased By 2013, at least 4 sporting activities are carried out annually -Testimonies-Reports Favourable policy framework
Results   1. Sporting facilities increased By 2013, at least 1 sports complex exist in the municipality -Visits-Reports Enabling economic environment
2. Sporting equipment in school increased By 2013 all the schools are supplied essential sporting equipment -Distribution reports Enabling economic environment
3. Sports teachers increased By 2013, at least 2 new sports teachers exist and are functional -Transfer decision-Administrative report Favourable policy framework

TRANSPORT :

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Circulation of goods and persons improved By 2015, at least 80% of the population travel safely and on time –          Testimonies-          Reports Security ensured
Specific objective Maritime transportroute system improved By 2015, transport engine boats increased and passengers travel all the  time –          Observation-          Reports Enabling economic environment
Results 1. Landing sites improved By 2014 at least 2 landing sites are constructed and functional –          Site visits-          Reports Enabling economic environment
2. Transport engine boats  increased By 2014 at last 4 transport engine boats available for travel betwen Barracks & Ngosso I –           Reports Enabling economic environment
3. State of engine boats used for transport improved Break downs and boat accidents reduced by at least 10% yearly –          Observations-          Reports Cooperation of boat owners
4. Respect for maritime transport route system regulations improved At least 70% of passenger boats have life  jackets and reduce overloading by 2015 –          Observations-          Reports Cooperation of boat owners

 

EMPLOYMENT AND VOCATIONAL TRAINING :

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Marketable skills of citizens increased At least 2 self employment programs are instituted and at least 30% of the population acquire gainful skills by 2015 TestimoniesBusiness reports -Security ensured-Enabling economic environment
Specific objective Household incomes increased At least 50% of households experience a 50 increase in their incomes by 2015 -Testimonies-Business reports -Security ensured-Enabling economic environment
Results

 

Knowledge and skills in self employment increased By 2013, at least 30% of citizens acquire knowledge and skills in small enterprises management -Visits-Council reports Favourable policy framework
Capital for businesses increased At least 20% of citizens have access to loans to start businesses by 2014 -Testimonies-Training reports Enabling economic conditions
Employment opportunities increased At least 20% of citizens start their own business  by 2014 -Visit to business places Functional micro finance institutions exist in the municipality

 

 SMALL AND MEDIUM SIZE ENTERPRISES, SOCIAL ECONOMY AND HANDICRAFT :

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Informal Sector Actors within the municipality increased By 2015  informal sector actors increase by at least 25% yearly –    council revenue reports-    testimonies –   security ensured-   enabling economic environment
Specific objective Small and medium size  enterprises increased By 2015 at least 20 small and medium size enterprises are operational in the municipality –    Visit-    Council reports enabling economic environment
Results 1. Capacity and skills of the population increased At least 300 persons  acquire knowledge and skills and operate small enterprise (carpenters, mechanics, tailoring, etc) –    Visit to business places-    Council reports –   enabling economic environment-   enthusiasm of youths
2.  Access to the services of small and medium size enterprises increased At least 40% of the population attend various training organized by this sector by 2014 Training reports –   enabling economic environment-   wiliness of the youths ensured

 

SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH AND INNOVATION: 

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Access to Scientific benefits increased within the municipality By 2015 at least 50% of the population have  access to scientific innovations –          Testimonies-          Council accounts report –          Favourable economic environment
Specific objective Technological innovations increased By 2015,  improved scientific technologies in livestock and agriculture available within the municipality –          Reports-          Testimonies –          Favourable economic  and political environment
Results 1. Dissemination of scientific innovations (inputs) improved By 2015 scientific inputs in livestock and agriculture  made available to all the villages –          Testimonies-          Scientific bulletins –          Favourable economic environment
2. Research outreach programs increased By 2014, research outreach programs  exist in the municipality –          Testimonies-          Administrative Reports Enabling economic environment

 

INDUSTRY, MINES AND TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT:

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Industrial base of the municipality increased Council industrial policy put in place  by 2013 –          Council  records-          Testimonies –          Favourable policy framework
Specific objective Development of the mining and industrial  sector improved At least two prospections conducted by 2014 –          Administrative reports-          Visit Existence of minerals
Results 1. Mining activities in the municipality promoted At least 1 oil company functional by 2014 –          Administrative reports –          Existence of oil
2. An industrial zone put in place By 2014 at leas one industrial zone exists –          Visits-          Administrative Reports Favourable political framework

COMMERCE :

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Global objective Commercial activities  increased within the municipality By 2015, revenue of the council  from commercial activities increase by at least 25% annually –          testimonies-          council revenue records Favourable policy framework
Specific objective Commercial activities increased Diversified commercial activities increase by at least 25% by 2015 –          Visit-          Council reports –          Enabling economic conditions-          Security ensured
Results 1. Micro – enterprises increased At last 30 lucrative micro – enterprise exists by 2015 –          Visit-          Council report –          Security ensured-          Enabling economic conditions
2. Marketing of products improved By 2015 at least 80% of the population market their products in appropriate environment and fetch good prices –          Visits-          Testimonies-          Council report –          Security ensured-          Enabling economic conditions

 

POST AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS:

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Telecommunication  in and out of the municipality increased At least 80% of the population send and receive information using telecommunication services by 2014 TestimoniesCommunication installations Favourable policy framework
Specific objective Post and telecommunication services improved At least 60% of the population are satisfied with post and telecommunication services -Testimonies-administrative reports Favourable policy framework
Results   1. Functional post office put in place At least 1 functional post office exist by 2013 -Visits-Administrative report Enabling economic environment
2. Mobile telephone networks increased At least 1 functional mobile telephone network exist by 2013 -Visit-Administrative report Enabling economic environment
3. Multimedia services put in place At least 1 multimedia service is put in place and functional -Visit-Administrative report Enabling economic environment 

COMMUNICATION :  

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Circulation of information increased At least 50% of the population receive and send information using mass communication services by 2015 – Testimonies- Administrativereport Favourable economic and political environment
Specific objective Communication networks improved At least 2 functional communication networks exist in the municipality by 2015 -Home visits-Administrativereports Favourable economic and political environment
Results   1. Access to CRTV signals increased By 2013, CRTV antenna in place and functional -Visits-Testimonies-Observation Favourable policy framework
2. Community radio put in place By 2013, a community radio in place and functional -Visit-Radio programmes Enabling economic climate
3. Circulation of newspapers increased By 2013, at least 1 news paper vendor in place selling at least 2 national newspapers -Newspapers Readers increased.

LABOUR AND SOCIAL SECURITY:

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Job security increased At least 30% of the working population have job security by 2015 –          Visit-          Administrative reports –          Enabling economic environment
Specific objective Employee Social security payments improved By 2015, at least 25% of employers regularly contribute social security of their workers –          Testimonies-          Administrative reports-          Visits Enabling economic environment
Results 1. Stabilized enterprises increased By 2013 at least 10 stabilized profitable enterprises exist –          Visit-           council reports-          Financial records –          Security ensured
2.  Civil society organizations increased At least 1 resident civil society organization exists and enhance development –          Visit-          Administrative reports Favourable political  climate
3. Organization and structuring of self employment improved At least 30% of the population run gainful businesses and make social security contributions –          Visits-          Council revenue records Stable economic environment

KOMBO ITINDI COUNCIL:   

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Provision of basic services to the population increased By 2015, at least 60% of the population have access to basic services within the municipality VisitsTestimoniesAdministrative reports Favourable economic and political conditions
Specific objective Functioning of the council improved By 2015, at least 80% of functional services of the council put in place -Council reports Favourable economic and political conditions
Results 1.  Council funds increased Council funds increased by at least 20% yearly and used as budgeted -Financial records Favourable business climate-Security ensured.
2. Council assets increased By 2015, council basic assets such as council chamber, office equipment are in place and used. -Inventory report-Visits Enabling economic conditions
3. Management of the council improved By 2012, an approved council organigram is in place and implemented.  Yearly planning, regular monitoring of activities carried out. -Council organigram-Council reports Favourable policy framework
4. Staff performance improved By 2015, at least 70% of staff implement their duties according to specified job descriptions and receive regular salaries -List of staff-Staff evaluation reports-Interviews Residence of staff ensured
5. Relationship with main stakeholders improved At least 60% of identified stakeholders actively participate in development activities of the municipality yearly. -Council-testimonies Collaboration of stakeholders ensured

 

6.0. OPERATIONAL PLANNING (PROGRAMMING)

6.1. Total cost of the Communal Development Plan (CDP)

No Sector         Cost of Activities (FCFA)
1 Kombo Itindi Council

283.500.000

2 Public Security

100.300.000

3 Territorial Administration and Decentralization

3.640.000

4 Livestock

18.640.000

5 Fisheries

216.600.000

6 Basic Education

164.360.000

7 Secondary Education

66.740.000

8 Environment, Nature Protection and Sustainable Development

147.000.000

9 Public Health

32.000.000

10 Energy

83.000.000

11 Water

1.362.000.000

12 Tourism and Leisure

100.500.000

13 Culture

58.100.000

14 Agriculture and Rural Development

31.500.000

15 State Property and Land Tenure

1.480.000

16 Housing and Urban Development

9.700.000

17 Forestry and Wildlife

59.820.000

18 Higher Education

400.000

19 Public Works

210.000.000

20 Social Affairs

100.150.000

21 Women  Empowerment and the Promotion of the Family

47.000.000

22 Youth and Citizen Education

72.300.000

23 Sports and Physical Education

54.300.000

24 Transport

18.000.000

25 Employment and Vocational Training

55.000.000

26 Small and Medium Size Enterprises, Social Economy  and Handicraft

6.820.000

27 Scientific Research and Innovation

7.500.000

28 Industry, Mines and Technological Development

1.500.000

29 Commerce

110.000.000

30 Post and Telecommunication

25.300.000

31 Communication

26.250.000

32 Labor and Social Security

1.500.000

33 Total Cost of KIC CDP

3.474.300.000

Total cost of the Communal Development Plan (CDP) for Kombo Itindi Municipality is three thousand four hundred seventy four

million, three hundred thousand francs CFA

6.2. Mid Term Expenditure Framework (MITEF) 3 years (2012 – 2014)

No Sector

Micro Projects / (Locations)

                         Cost

Funding Source

1 Energy Install 2 thermal electricity Plants(Barracks & Ngosso)

80.000.000

 PIB

2   Maintain 2 thermal Electricity Plants(Barracks & Ngosso)

500.000

Council Budget

3   Institute Resettlement mechanisms in 12 villages( Njat I, Isu, Gold Coast Iwaha Njat I & II, Kombo Adibo I & II, New Kombo I & II, New Barracks, Oboh Affeh, Useh Uyoh)

2.000.000

KIC / VDC

4   Supply 12 Community Generators( Njat I, Isu, Gold Coast Iwaha Njat I & II, Kombo Adibo I & II, New Kombo I & II, New Barracks, Oboh Affeh, Useh Uyoh)

50.000.000

PIB

5   Maintain 12 Community Generators( Njat I, Isu, Gold Coast Iwaha Njat I & II, Kombo Adibo I & II, New Kombo I & II, New Barracks, Oboh Affeh, Useh Uyoh)

 5.000.000

KIC / Villages

6 Water Conduct 2 Studies (Barracks & Ngosso)

2.050.000

PNDP

7   Construct  4 Bore holes (Barracks & Ngosso)

140.000.000

PNDP / PIB

8   Institute 2 Sustainibility Mechanism(Barracks & Ngosso)

500.000

Council Budget

9 Maintain 2 Water Schemes(Barracks & Ngosso)

500.000

Council Budget

10 Public Works Construct 240 gutters and Culverts in 8 villages(Ngosso I, Barracks, Njat I, Isu, Gold Coast, Iwaha Njat I, Kombo Adibo I, New Kombo I)

  48.000.000

PIB

11 Construct 240 Embankments along  the Coastline in 8 villages(Ngosso I, Barracks, Njat I, Isu, Gold Coast, Iwaha Njat I, Kombo Adibo I, New Kombo I)

 380.000.000

PIB

12 Transport Construct 2 Landing Sites   (Barracks & Ngosso)

2.000.000

PIB

13   Purchase 1 Boat with engine (in Ngosso I)

15.000.000

PIB

14   Maintain 1 Boat(in Ngosso I)

2.000.000

PIB

15 Fisheries Train fishermen and women on improved  fishing methods in 12 villages( Njat I, Isu, Gold Coast, Iwaha Njat I & II, Kombo Adibo I & II, New Kombo I & II, New Barracks, Oboh Affeh, Useh Uyoh)

5.000.000

– PNDP

– HPI

-Tele Food

16    Supply Equipment to fishermen and women in 12 villages( Njat I, Isu, Gold Coast, Iwaha Njat I & II, Kombo Adibo I & II, New Kombo I & II, New Barracks, Oboh Affeh, Useh Uyoh)

60.000.000

– SOWEDA

– MINATD

– PIB

17   Organize 12 Control Missions(in Ngosso I)

12.000.000

MINATD

18   Construct 4 ice plants (Ngosso I, Barracks, Isu, Gold Coast)

84.000.000

PNDP/ SOWEDA

19   Construct 12 Chokor Ovens  ( Njat I, Isu, Gold Coast Iwaha, Njat I & II, Kombo Adibo I & II, New Kombo I & II, New Barracks, Oboh Affeh, Useh Uyoh)

40.000.000

PNDP/ SOWEDA

20   Create 12 Fish Associations ( Njat I, Isu, Gold Coast, Iwaha Njat I & II, Kombo Adibo I & II, New Kombo I & II, New Barracks, Oboh Affeh, Useh Uyoh)

100.000

Council budget

21 Basic Education Lobby for the transfer of (13) trained teachers (Ngosso I, Barracks, Njat I, Isu, Gold Coast)

   500.000

Council budget

22   Construct 12 Classrooms(Ngosso I, Barracks, Njat I, Isu, Gold Coast)

120.000.000

–   PIB

– PNDP

– FIECOM

23   Construct  5 latrines (Ngosso I, Barracks, Njat I, Isu, Gold Coast)

34.000.000

–   PIB

– PNDP

– FIECOM

24   Construct 5 Water Points (Ngosso I, Barracks, Njat I, Isu, Gold Coast)

52.000.000

FEICOM

25   Supply 402 desks (Ngosso I, Barracks, Njat I, Isu, Gold Coast)

12.060.000

PIB

26   Supply 8  lots of tables and chairs (Ngosso I, Barracks, Njat I, Isu, Gold Coast)

2.000.000

                           PIB
27   Supply 5 lots of didactic materials (Ngosso I, Barracks, Njat I, Isu, Gold Coast)

5.000.000

PIB

28 Public Health Lobby for the transfer of 4 staff (Barracks & Ngosso)

300.000

Council budget

29   Design 2 out reach programs(Barracks & Ngosso)

100.000

– GIZ

– MINSANTE

30   Implement 2 Outreach Programs(Barracks & Ngosso)

5.000.000

– MINSANTE

31   Auquire a boat for Ngosso Health Centre (Ngosso I)

15.000.000

– PNDP

32   Create 2 Pro- Pharmacies (Barracks & Ngosso)

5.000.000

GIZ

33   Train 2 Pharmacy Attendants (in Ngosso I)

1.000.000

SWSFH

34   Supply 2 sets of Assorted Drugs (Barracks & Ngosso)

3.000.000

                        -GIZ

-SWSFH

35   Equip health centers with beds, delivery kits, laboratory Equipment and Generators (Barracks & Ngosso)

15.000.000

– PNDP

39 Secondary Education Lobby for the transfer of 6 trained teachers (Barracks)

500.000

Council budget

40   Construct 2 classrooms (Barracks)

18.000.000

PNDP

41   Construct 1 latrine (Barracks)

3.500.000

                       PNDP
42   Construct 1 Water Ponit(Barracks)

30.000.000

PIB

43   Supply 50 Desks (Barracks)

1.500.000

PIB

44   Supply 6 lots of  Tables and Chairs (Barracks)

1.500.000

PIB

45   Construct 1 Library (Barracks)

30.000.000

                           PIB
46   Equip Library (Barracks)

2.000.000

NBDC

47 Kombo Itindi Council Build Council Chambers (in Ngosso I)

175.000.000

FEICOM

48   Equip Council Chambers (in Ngosso I)

25.000.000

FEICOM

49   Build Capacity of Council Staff (in Ngosso I)

1.000.000

PNDP

50   Organize trainings for councilors and committees(in Ngosso I)

2.000.000

PNDP

51   Organize a forum with main stakeholders (Ngosso I, Barracks, Njat I, Isu, Gold Coast)

1.000.000

MINATD

52   Facilitate the Creation of Common  Initiative Groups especially among the Nigerian communities(Ngosso I, Barracks, Njat I, Isu, Gold Coast)

1.000.000

SOWEDA

53   Initiate decentralized cooperation with other Bakassi councils(in Ngosso I)

1.000.000

MINATD

54 Public Security Construct Police Station (in Ngosso I)

17.000.000

PIB

55 Total KIC MITEF

2.197.160.000

KIC MITEF cost two thousand one hunderd ninety seven million one hundred and sixty thousand francs CFA.

6.3.   Annual Investment Plan

6.3.1. Available Resources and Deadlines

No Donor

Amount (FCFA)

When

Donor Conditions
1 FEICOM

200, 000,000

June

Submit proposal to FEICOM (special status for Bakassi Councils)
2 PIB

46, 550,000

March

Decentralized Transfer of Funds
3 MINATD

30, 000,000

June

Operating costs for Bakassi councils
4 Global Tax

7, 500,000

October

Tax recovery team on the field
5 PNDP

201, 000,000

March

Partner contribution available
6 FEICOM

7, 500,000

June

Grants for Running costs
7 KIC

21.000.000

March

Partner contribution
8 TOTAL

513.550.000

6.3.2.      Annual Program of Priority  Projects (2012)

No

Sector

Name of Project

Type of Project

Objective

Location (s)

Financing

Execution Period

Project Cost / Vote Holder

1

Basic Education

Construct  4 classrooms in Primary schools

Construction

To increase access to quality education facilities

Barracks, Njat I

PNDP/KIC

July 2012

36.000.000/ Mayor

2

 

Construct  2 classrooms in Primary schools

Construction

To increase access to quality education facilities

Gold Coast (Oche Iwake Osuk)

PIB

July 2012

23.000.000 / Mayor

3

 

Supply of Yamaha Power Generator

Supplies

To increase access to quality education facilities

Gold Coast (Oche Iwake Osuk)

PIB

July 2012

1.500.000 / DD Basic Education

4

 

Supply 60 benches

Supplies

To increase access to quality education facilities

Gold Coast (Oche Iwake Osuk)

PIB

July 2012

1.800.000/ Mayor

5

 

Supply Tables and Chairs

Supplies

To increase access to quality education facilities

Gold Coast (Oche Iwake Osuk)

PIB

July 2012

250.000/ Mayor

6

 

Construct 3 latrines in Primary schools

Construction

To increase hygiene in educational institutions

Barracks, Gold Coast, Isu

PNDP/KIC

July 2012

10.500.000/ Mayor

7

Secondary Education

Construct 2 classrooms in GSS Barracks

Construction

To increase access to quality education facilities

Barracks

PNDP/KIC

July 2012

18.000.000/ Mayor

8

 

Construct 1 latrine in GSS Barracks

Construction

To increase hygiene in educational institutions

Barracks

PNDP/KIC

July 2012

3.500.000/ Mayor

9

Energy

Install 2 Thermal Electricity Generators

Supplies

To improve the standard of living of inhabitants within the municipality

Barracks and Ngosso

PIB

July 2012

18.000.000/ Mayor

10

Fisheries

Training on improved fishing methods

Supplies

To transfer efficient self sustaining skills to the fishing population

Ngosso I

PNDP/KIC

February 2012

1.000.000/ Mayor

11

 

Construct  (2) ice plants

Construction

To reduce post harvest losses and increase preservation of fish

Barracks and Isu

PNDP/KIC

June 2012

42.000.000/ Mayor

12

 

Construct two (2) chokor  ovens

Construction

To reduce post harvest losses and increase preservation of fish

Ngosso and Barracks

PNDP/KIC

June 2012

8.000.000/ Mayor

13

 

Supply of Fishing equipment

Supplies

To ensure sustainable harvest of fishes

Barracks and Isu

MINATD

June 2012

30.000.000 / MINATD

14

Public Health

Equip Health centers

Supplies

To increase access to quality health care

Ngosso I and Barracks

PNDP/KIC

July 2012

15.000.000/ Mayor

15

 

Acquire Engine boat

Supplies

To increase access to quality health care

Ngosso I

PNDP/KIC

July 2012

15.000.000/ Mayor

16

Water

Construct 2 Bore holes

Construction

To increase access to quality portable water

Barracks and Ngosso I

PNDP/KIC

July 2012

70.000.000/ Mayor

17

Kombo Itindi Council

Train Staff and Councilors

Supplies

To improve the functioning of the council

Ngosso I

PNDP/KIC

February 2012

3.000.000/ Mayor

18

 

Construct Council Chambers

Construction

To ensure the effective presence of council services within the municipality

Ngosso I

FEICOM

October 2012

175.000.000 / DG FEICOM

19

 

Equip Council Chambers

Supplies

To improve the functioning of the council

Ngosso I

FEICOM

October 2012

25.000.000 / DG FEICOM

20

Public Security

Construct Police Station

Construction

To increase security and safety within the municipality

Ngosso I

PIB

October 2012

17.000.000 / Delegate General of National Security

21

Total  AIP

513.550.000

 

KIC Micro projects for 2012 stands at five hundred thirteen million five hundred and fifty thousand francs CFA

6.4.  Simplified Environmental Management Framework for the MITEF.

 6.4.1. Main Potential Impact (socio- environmental) and

Mitigation measures

a)       Possible Social Impacts :

Micro project type in the MITEF Possible Social  Impacts  (Positive)  Possible Social  Impacts  (Social  Risks) Mitigation Measures
Construct Ice Plants/ Choker Ovens –     Increased Income for the population and the council-     Increased protein intake-     Reduction in malnutrition-     Food security ensured –     Site selection & managementConflicts –     Compensation of land lords-     Create and train management committees
Construct Classrooms/ Supply Didactic materials –     Effective presence of transferes teachers-     High performance in public exams-     Condusive learning environment-     Increased  literacy rate

–     Reduced Rural Exodus

–     Reduced playgrounds and farmland –     More allocation of land for play ground
Construct Embarkments, Culverts, Gutters –     Improved circulation of persons and goods-     Increased safety for landing boats-     Increased income for the council –     Increase in accident –     Sign board  along the embarkments indicating danger zones
Install  two (2) thermal electricity plants with Generators –     Increase in socio economic activities-     Reduction in rural exodus-     Increase in self employment-     Increase in communication –     Increased Pirate activities-     Fire desasters-     Conflict in site selection –     Create and train management committees-     Community Vigilante groups-     High security control-     Installation of circuit breakers
Construct water schemes with water points –     Reduction of  water borne diseases-     Intensification and diversification of socio cultural activities due to increase time available-     Improved hygiene and sanitation-     Better Gender relations –      Poor sanitation around water systems –     Sensitisation of the population proper hygiene and sanitation
Construct Council Chambers –     Effective presence of council services within the municipality.-     Reduced costs of running council operations-     Improved Council Village relationships-     Increased revenue collection by the council –     Site selection conflicts-     Dirty Surroundings –     Fence the premises and secure nightwatchman-     Sensitize population on council services
Supply equipment (beds, delivery kits, laboratories) –     Reduction in mobility and mortality rates-     Improvement in health status –     Poor hygienic conditions in use of equipments –     Sensitisation on ante natal and patient conditions relating to use of equipments

b)     Possible Environmental Impacts : 

Micro project type in MITEF Possible Environmental Impacts  (positive)  Possible Environmental Impacts  (Environmental Risks) Mitigation Measures
Construct Ice Plants/ Choker Ovens –     Reduction in post harvest losses for  fish catches –     Destruction of the soil layers through digging –     Backfilling
Construct Classrooms/ Supply Didactic materials –     Better  environment for learning & Improved School results –     Alterations in natural habitats –     Backfilled and trees planting
Construct Embarkments, Culverts, Gutters –     Safer Landing Ports ,attractive environment ,Reduced floods-     Reduced presence of  mosquitoes –     Alterations of Water courses and possible flooding in some areas –     Assessment for effective deviation of the water courses
Install  two (2)thermal electricity plants with Generators –     Better Storage facilities and improved standards of living including eating –     Carbon monoxide Pollution of the atmosphere –     Institute requirement for carbon filter to reduce pollution
Construct water schemes with water points –     Better Drinking Water.-     Reduced Water borne diseases-     Improvement of hygiene and sanitation –     Soil erosion-     Waste (human & household)Disposal around water points –     Backfilling-     Construct soak away pits-     Sensitize on water use
Construct Council Chambers –          Bueatify Ngosso-          Effective presence of KIC within the municipality –     Destruction of flora and funa-     Increase in soil erosion –     Planting of trees around the council-     Construct drainage system
Supply equipment (beds, delivery kits, laboratories) –     Improved hygienic and sanitation conditions in the health centers and hospitals –     Poor waste disposal –     Dumping site for waste will be created and used-     Gabage cans will be installed

6.4.2. Simplefied Socio Environmental Management Plan

The plan below outlines  the measures,  actors,  periods and follow up indicators with corresponding  costs associated with the MITEF.

Environmental measures Putting in place actors Periods Follow up actors Costs Observations
Train Council Follow up Committee on environmental aspects of project implementation(Using PNDP’s socio-environmental management framework). PNDP    2012
  • Div. Delegations of MINEP  & MINAS
  • PNDP
Council / PNDP joint budget
Checklist on the Socio-environmental form. SG and  Development Officer 2012 to   2014
  • Div. Delegations of MINEP  & MINAS
  • PNDP
  • Follow up Committee
  • Minicipal councilor s
Council / PNDP joint budget Associated Cost are inbuilt at  micro project conception level
Train COMES on Policies to safeguard socio environmental aspects. PNDP 2012    to 2013
  • Div. Delegations of MINEP  & MINAS
  • PNDP
  • Follow up Committee
  • Minicipal councilor s
 Council / PNDP joint budget
Conduct Environnemental Impact  Studies/ Assessments (EIA) Council Executives and PNDP. 2012 to   2014
  •  Div. Delegations of MINEP  & MINAS

PNDP
Follow up Committee
Minicipal councilor s

Council / PNDP joint budget The Council shall cover any costs associated with esettlements.
Monitor Socio Environmental Management Plan and Contractors. Follow up Committee andContractors 2012 to   2014
  • Div. Delegations of MINEP  & MINAS

 

 Council / PNDP joint budget

6.5.CONTRACT AWARD PLAN

The CAP is presented in three categories namely; construction

, infrastructure and supplies which constitute those funded by the

PNDP.

Category Project Location Deposit  of Tender Delivery of Tender Contract Amount (proposed)
Construction Construct  4 classrooms in Primary schools Barracks, Njat I

15/ 03/ 12

11/07/ 12

36.000.000

(PNDP financing)

  Construct  2 classrooms in Primary schools Gold Coast (Oche Iwake Osuk)

15/ 03/ 12

11/07/ 12

23.000.000

  Construct 3 latrines in Primary schools Barracks, Gold Coast, Isu

15/ 03/ 12

11/07/ 12

10.500.000

(PNDP financing)

  Construct 2 classrooms in GSS Barracks Barracks

15/ 03/ 12

11/07/ 12

18.000.000

(PNDP financing)

  Construct 1 latrine in GSS Barracks Barracks

15/ 03/ 12

11/07/ 12

3.500.000

(PNDP financing)

  Construct  (2) ice plants Barracks and Isu

13/03/12

29/06/12

42.000.000

(PNDP financing)

  Construct two (2) chokor  ovens Ngosso and Barracks

13/03/12

29/06/12

8.000.00

(PNDP financing)0

  Construct Council Chambers Ngosso I

18/06/12

26/10/12

175.000.000

  Construct Police Station Ngosso I

18/06/12

26/10/12

17.000.000

Infrastructure Construct 2 Bore holes Barracks and Ngosso I

70.000.000

(PNDP financing)

Supplies Supply of Yamaha Power Generator Gold Coast (Oche Iwake Osuk)

14/03/12

2/07/12

1.500.000

  Supply 60 benches Gold Coast (Oche Iwake Osuk)

14/03/12

2/07/12

1.800.000

  Supply Tables and Chairs Gold Coast (Oche Iwake Osuk)

14/03/12

2/07/12

250.000

  Install 2 Thermal Electricity Generators Barracks and Ngosso

14/03/12

2/07/12

18.000.000

(PNDP financing)

  Training on improved fishing methods Ngosso I

13/02/12

27/02/12

1.000.000

(PNDP financing)

  Supply of Fishing equipment Barracks and Isu

13/02/12

27/02/12

30.000.000

  Equip Health centers Ngosso I and Barracks

14/03/12

2/07/12

15.000.000

(PNDP financing)

  Acquire Engine boat Ngosso I

14/03/12

2/07/12

15.000.000

(PNDP financing)

  Train Staff and Councilors Ngosso I

13/02/12

27/02/12

3.000.000

(PNDP financing)

  Equip Council Chambers Ngosso I

18/06/12

26/10/12

25.000.000

Total CAP         513.550.000

7.0. MONITORING AND EVALUATION MECHANISM

 7.1.Composition and functioning of the Follow up Committee

 At the end of the elaboration of the CDP, a Follow-Up Committee was put inplace and installed giving it legitimacy.

No Name Position Function Telephone
1 Richard Akime President Secretary General 74 88 16 69
2 Valantine Ambai Secretary Development Agent 70 21 29 81
3 Esuk Mary Effiong Member 2nd Deputy Mayor 74 77 05 35
4 Ayuk Hanson Member Councilor 74 85 94 14
5 Anki Clement Member Councilor 96 94 52 80
6 Esuk Mary Ateh Member Councilor 98 61 55 64
7 MUDEC Group, Buea Technical Adviser LSO 77 64 94 30

Main duties of the Follow up Committee:

  • Follow up work done by contractors as per the contract specifications including environmental issues
  • Execute periodic supervision visits to ensure that effective work is being done
  • Obtain funds through communication with the competent persons or structures
  • Evaluate and Update the AIP and MITEF
  • Update the Consolidated Report (Monographic Study) of Kombo Itindi Council.
  • Search alternative sources of Funding for council activities.
  • Operate an email address for the council
  • Work in close collaboration with Council Executives
  • Produce Monthly & Quarterly reports to the council

7.2.  Indicators for monitoring and evaluation (relation to the AIP)

Micro project
Strategic Action to be accomplished
Date of Monitoring and Evaluation
Resources needed
What was planned to be done Person Responsible What has been done What still has to be done When should it be completed What will be there to show that it has been done Comments and reaction of the M&E committte
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3
Activity 4
Activity 5

 

7.3. Follow up Plans,Tools and Frequency (2012)

 

No. Duties Tasks Tools Expected Results Time Responsible
1 Participatory Management of information related to the execution of the CDP Collection of data Data Sheets Collected data Permanent Dev. Agent
Reporting Data consolidation charts Reports Monthly Dev. Agent
Hold Meetings Minutes Reports Monthly President Follow up Committee
Review & Dispatch Reports Project Monitoring book, Progress Reports, Project Schedule Reports Monthly Mayor
2 Participatory Administration of the Follow up process Prepare Committee Action & submit to Mayor/PNDP Action Plans Reports Monthly Dev. Agent Committee Chairperson
Hold Focus meeting on AIP & CAP Meeting Report  March 31st 2012 Mayor/SG/Dev. Agent
Monitor Tender Process on Feasibility Studies (FS) Action Plans Reports Monthly SG/Dev. & Fin. Agents
Monitor  Execution of FS Action Plans Reports Monthly SG/Dev. & Fin. Agents
Ensure proper validation of FS Meetings Reports Monthly SG/Dev. & Fin. Agents
Submit request for financing from PNDP/other funders Request form Cash transfer April Mayor
Mobilize Council/Community contributions Meetings Reports March Mayor, SG/Dev. & Fin. Agents
Monitor Tender Process on execution of projects Action Plans Reports Monthly SG/Dev. & Fin. Agents
Monitor execution of micro projects Action Plans Reports Monthly SG/Dev. & Fin. Agents
Plan spot checks during project execution Project Monitoring book, Progress Reports, Project Schedule Reports Monthly President Follow up Committee
Unplan spot checks during project execution Surveys Reports Weekly VDC & VTC, Couniclor
Monitor validation of receipt of completed projects Meetings Reports After project execution SG/Dev. & Fin. Agents
Monitor commissioning & use of projects Meetings Reports After project execution Follow up Committee members
3 Socio Environmental Management Train Follow up Committee on Environmental PNDP Checlist aspects of project management Training kit Report March Mayor
Train Enlarged Council Session on Socio- environmental Policies Training kit Report March Mayor
Monitor Socio environment aspects of projects Action Plan Report During project execution SG/Dev. & Fin. Agents
Conduct Environmental Impact Assesments (studies) Action Plan Report During project execution SG/Dev. & Finance Agents
Monitor Socio Environmental Management Plan Action Plan Report During project execution SG/Dev. & Finance Agents
4 Logistical Support to Contractors during project execution Provide  Safekeeping for Materials Rooms Materials safe Daily VDC & VTC, Couniclor
Provide Lodging Contractor comfortable Daily VDC & VTC, Couniclor
5 Communication of CDP contents Review & Execute communication plan Meetings Reports Monthly SG/Dev. & Finance Agents
Create & maintain contacts with potential funding partners for 2013 projects Internet Reports Monthly SG/Dev. & Finance Agents
Initiate and Maintain Decentralized Cooperation with Bakassi Councils Meetings Reports Monthly SG/Dev. & Finance Agents
Maintain liaison role with all technical services at sub divisional, divisional & regional levels Meetings Reports Monthly SG/Dev. & Finance Agents
6 Participatory Reviews Update Council Monograph Meeting Report November SG/Dev. & Finance Agents
Review 2012 AIP Meeting Report November SG/Dev. & Finance Agents
Review MITEF & Prepare 2013 AIP Meeting Report November SG/Dev. & Finance Agents
Facilitate Resource Mobilization for 2013 Internet, Correspondences, Meetings Report Monthly SG/Dev. & Finance Agents
Facilitate Municipal Deliberation 2013 AIP Meeting Report November Mayor
7 Execute (timely) Financial Contractual Commitments Raise PV Checks Reports Monthly Finance Agent
Sign Checks Checks Reports Monthly Mayor
Produce financial reports Income statement Reports Monthly Fin. Agent

7.4.  Review Mechanism of the CDP and preparation of the next AIP

The KIC should organise quarterly reviews of the AIP to ascertain the rate of realisation and also to correct gaps. At the end of the year, there should be an evaluation of planned and realized activities. The evaluation exercise should inform the council on the various lapses and thereby enable them improve on future performances.

After the annual evaluation and a review of the MITEF, a 2013 AIP should be elaborated taking into consideration the gaps and best practices of the previous plan.The council should be current with information on new orientations and emerging issues that could  be exploited and integrated in the new AIP.

The services of competent development actors including the technical expertise of the PNDP should be actively solicited before and during the elaboration of the new plan.

7.5. Communication Plan of the CDP

The Communication Plan to be produced annually,  is a tool which will inform the

council on best possible ways to make the broadest publicity about its CDP to the public

and to technical and financial partners.

ACTION TIMEFRAME PERSONS RESPONSIBLE
Produce and circulate fliers to all villages containing objectives, activities, and community rights & responsibilities on the CDP March to April 2012 Mayor /SG/Dev. Officer
Organise Open Day in 5 Key villages  and distribute MITEF/ AIP to  all socio development groups  March to April  2012 Mayor, Deputies/SG/ Dev. Officer
Jumpstart Decentralized cooperation of Bakassi Councils March 15th to 28th, 2012 Mayor, Deputies/SG/ Dev. Officer
Lobby potential partners including PNDP, SONARA, HPI, SOWEDA, FEICOM, ADDAX, KOSMOS, GLENCORE, MINADER, MINEPIA, MINEPAT, MINBASE, MINSEC, MINSANTE, MINEE, MINTRANSPORT, MINTP, Elites and Embassies. March 2012 Mayor, Deputies/SG & Follow-up committee

 

  1. 8.  CONCLUSION:

The process to elaborate the CDP of KIC can be effectively appreciated when one looks at the actors and tools at each stage within the process, the timing, the challenges encountered and the way forward. The process took place between the months of July and December 2011 and involved three principal actors including the council (beneficiary), the PNDP (financial and technical support) and the LSO (service provider). Other actors including council management, staff, local stakeholders and technical services were actively involved at various stages of the process which included; preparation, participatory diagnosis, data consolidation and analysis, planning, resource mobilization and programming, monitoring and evaluation. The preparatory stage started with the training of LSO data collectors who later restituted the training to other research assistants. The council and the LSO held several planning meetings and sensitized (using fliers, circulars and the radio) the population on their role and responsibilities which ended with the holding of the official launching workshop. The main result in this first stage was to create awareness and increase the participation rate of the stakeholders. The next stage was the participatory diagnosis stage which withnessed the collection and treatment of information (using a variety of tools) at the level of the council, urban space and in all villages sector by sector. The diagnosis in the council involved councilors, staff, council management, and beneficiaries of council services including technical collaborators located within the municipality. Diagnosis at the level of the urban space was conducted in Barracks (main commercial town) and Ngosso I (administrative head quarters) because they had a few sectors with infrastructure which makes them somewhat urban. Diagnoses involving twenty nine identified sectors were also conducted in all thirty two villages. The main outputs at this stage were the CID and USD reports. The third stage involved the consolidation of the village by village and sectorial data which enabled the production of the consolidated diagnosis and mapping report. The forth stage in the process included the planning workshop, resource mobilization and programming during which yhe deliberations of several participants facilitated the production of a draft CDP. The last two stages in the process involved implementation (AIP and CAP) and monitoring and evaluation of financed activities. The entire process was challenging because it was participatory with sometimes conflicting viewpoints. The level of understanding of stakeholders also added to the challenges as planners had to speak through interpreters with the risk of information being distorted. The timing of the process was problematic in that it data was collected during the heart of the rainy season with violent sea waves that put immense strain on the research assistants. Due to insecurity within the municipality, researchers were accompanied by BIR elements who were constantly putting pressure on the data collection activities by hurrying to return to their bases because they were not well informed on the need for patience when communicating with villagers.

Finally, the collaboration between the main actors in the CDP elaboration process was relatively cordial largely due to the fact that the roles and responsibilities of each were clearly spelt out and constantly being reviewed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Back to: