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Toko Development Plan

  

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Title Pages
Table of Contents ii.
List of Abbreviations iii
List of Tables v
List of  Figures and Maps v
List of Annexes vi.
1. 0.     INTRODUCTION vi
1.1.      Context and Justification vi
1.2.      Objectives of the CDP vii
1.3.      Structure of the CDP vii
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY viii
2. 0.     METHODOLOGY 1
2.1.      Preparatory Process 1
2.2.     Collection and Analysis of Information 1
2.3.     Data Consolidation and Mapping 3
2.4.     Planning Workshop, Resource Mobilization & Programming 3
2.5.     Participatory Monitoring & Evaluation Mechanism 4
3.0.     SUMMARY  PRESENTATION OF THE COUNCIL 6
3.1.      Description of the Biophysical Environment 6
3.2.      History and People of the Council (origin of the people, population, ethnic groups, religions,main economic activities) 11
3.3.    Main Potentials and Resources of the Council 17
3.4.    Thematic Maps
4.0.  SUMMARY OF PARTICIPATORY DIAGNOSIS 18
4.1.Consolidation of Diagnosis Information (Excel Sheets) 18
4.2.            Main Problems identified per Sector 22
4.3.Needs identified per Sector 22
4.4.Table of Priority Projects per Village (Key Sectors) 31
5.0.     STRATEGIC PLANNING 35
5.1.     Vision & Objectives  of the Communal Development Plan (CDP) 35
5.2.    Logical Framework by Sector 36
5.3.    Land Use Plan 67
6.0.    OPERATIONAL PLANNING 68
6.1.    CDP Budget 68
6.2.    Mid Term (3 year) Expenditure Framework (MITEF) 69
6.3.    Annual Investment Plan (AIP) 74
6.3.1. Available Resources & Periodicity 74
6.3.2.  Annual Plan (2012) of Priority Projects 74
6.4.   Simplified Environmental Mangement Framework of the MITEF 79
6.4.1.  Main Potential Impacts (social & environmental) and Mitigating measures 79
6.4.2. Simplifed Socio – environmental Management Plan 82
6.5.    Contract Award Plan 84
7.0.   MONITORING & EVALUATION MECHANISM 87
7.1.  Composition & Functioning Follow up Committee 87
7.2.   Indicators for Monitoring & Evaluation System and (compared to  AIP & sectorial policies) 87
7.3.  Follow up Plans, Tools & Monitoring Frequency 88
7.4.  CDP Review & Mechanism for the next ( 2013) AIP 92
7.5.  Communication Plan of the CDP 92
8.0.   CONCLUSION 93
9.0.    ANNEXES
9.1. Prefectural Order Rendering Functional the CDP
9.2. Municipal Delideration Validating the CDP
9.3. Validated Support Administrative Documents
9.4. Attendance Sheets
9.5. Picture Gallery
9.6. Reports of Diagnosis (CID, USD, Consolidated Village by Village)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LISTS OF ABBREVATIONS

 

CDP                            Communal Development Plan

CEFAM                Centre de Formation de L’Administration Municipale (Local Government                         Training Center)

CSO                            Civil Society Organizations

CIG                            Common Initiative Group

FEICOM                    Fonds Special d’Equipement et d’Intervention Intercommunale (Special Council Support Fund for Local Authorities)

FS                               Feasibility Studies

FSLC                         First School Leaving Certificate

GCE                          General Certificate of Education

GESP                         Growth Employment Strategy Paper

GNS                            Government Nursery School

GHS                            Government High School

GPS                            Government Primary School

GSS                            Government Secondary School

GPS                            Global Positioning System

HIV/AIDS                Human Immuno Deficiency Virus/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome

HPI                             Hiefer Project International, Cameroon

LBA                            Licence Buying Agent

LSO                           Local Support Organization

MDG                         Millenium Development Goals

MINFOF                    Ministry of Forestry and Wildlife

MITEF                       Mid Term Expenditure Framework (3 year Invesyment Plan)

MUDEC                     Municipal Development Counselling Group

NBDC                        National Book Development Council

NTFP                         Non Timber Forest Products

OSRI                          Organization for Sustainable Rural Infrastructure

PTA                            Parent Teacher Association

PNDP                        Programme Nationale Developpement Participatif (National Community Driven Development Program)

SDO                            Senior Divisional Officer

SG SOC                     SITHE GLOBAL (Palm Investment Company)

SWOT                      Strengths Weaknesses Opprtunities   Threats

SWSFH                      South West Special Fund for Health

TOC                           Toko Council

VDC                           Village Development Committee

VTC                           Village Traditional Council

 

LIST OF TABLES

Table 1: Different Ethnic Groups in the Municipality

11

Table 2: Population Densities by Age Groups

13

Table 3: Population Distribution by Gender

14

Table 4: Asset, Potential and Constriants

17

Table 5: Budget Analysis of TOC (2008-2010)

21

LIST OF FIGURES & MAPS

XXXX

Figure 1: Age Structure of the Population

11

Figure 2: Population Distribution by Gender

13

Figure 3: Map of South West showing TOC

15

Figure 4: Map of TOC

16

Figure 5: Organizational Chart of TOC

20

Figure 6: Landuse Map of TOC

67

 

 

1.0.    INTRODUCTION

1.1      Context and Justification

The Government of Cameroon in July 2004 enacted the Law on Decentralization as Applicable to Local Council which mandated councils to provide basic services in several domains including economic, social, health, education, and culture and sports development within their municipalities. The Government has since fostered the process through other instruments such as the Growth and Employment Strategy Paper, the MDGs, the MAPUTO & ACCRA Conventions which are geared at making the country an emergent economy by 2035. Councils have received funds transferred through the Public Investment Budget (PIB) in some key ministries such as Basic and Secondary Education, Public Health, Women Empowerment and Social Affairs to mention but a few.

The following decrees have also fostered the process:

  • Decree N° 2010/0242/PM of 26th February 2010 with regards to the promotion of agricultural production and rural development.
  • Decree N° 2010/0242/PM of 26th February 2010 with regards to the promotion of livestock and fish farming.
  • Decree N° 2010/0242/PM of 26th February 2010 with regards to the construction and maintenance of rural unclassified roads and with  regards to potable water supply in the zones not covered by the public network for the distribution of water conceded by the State.

Further to all these efforts, the National Community Driven Development Programme (PNDP) was commissioned to contribute meaningfully toward poverty alleviation using participatory strategies at the level of local councils. Within the framework for the execution of the PNDP, a cooperation agreement was signed between Toko Council, the PNDP and MUDEC Group (a Local Support Organization) in which the PNDP has offered technical and financial support to enable MUDEC Group accompany Toko Council toward the elaboration of its Communal Development Plan (CDP).

A major output of the planning process is the production of a council monograph which is a sector per sector consolidated report of the findings within each village.

 

 

 

1.2.            Objectives of the CDP:

 

The overall objective of the Communal Development Plan is to enable all development actors to participatorily identify, analyze and document their felt human, material and financial needs and to collectively ensure the follow up of all development initiatives within their municipality.

.

The specific objectives include to;

  • Sensitize all development stakeholders within the municipality to encourage participation and ownership of the planning process.
  • Conduct participatory diagnosis at the council level (CID), urban level (USD), and village level (consolidated village diagnosis).
  • Institute a Follow up Committee to monitor the implementation of micro projects.
  • Build partnership and resources (financial, material, human) between the council and its development stakeholders.
  • To encourage communal development planning as a process in participatory development and sustainability in poverty reduction, growth and employment creation.

 

1.3  Structure of the CDP :

This document is structured in nine (09) chapters as follows:

  • Introduction.
  • Executive Summary
  • Methodology.
  • Presentation of the Council.
  • Summary of Diagnosis Results.
  • Strategic Planning.
  • Operational Planning.
  • Monitoring and Evaluation Mechanism.
  • Conclusion

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The Government of Cameroon has instituted several instruments (GESP, 2004 Law on Decentralization, Inter Ministerial/ Sectorial Commissions, Transfer of Resources and Competencies) which collectively are designed to positively impact on the lives of the average Cameroonian at the level of local councils. Recently, the National Community Driven Development Programme (PNDP) was commissioned to actualize this goverment effort by facilitating the elaboration of Communal Development Plans (CDP) in the country. Toko council in Ndian Division of the South West Region signed a convention with the PNDP in which the latter supported the council in engaging the Local Support Organization (MUDEC Group) to accompany it in the realization of its CDP through participatory planning processes.

Beginning from 4th July to 13th December 2011, the methodology prescribed by the PNDP was strictly adhered to which has resulted in the production of the document.

A quick look at the key findings reveal that  inhabitants of Toko municipality are preoccupied with the near lack of infrastructure especially the absence of a road network linking the villages to the outside world, limited supply of portable water, limited access to electricity and communication. These situations have immensely contributed to the low agricultural production and commercial activities resulting in rural exodus of the population especially the youth.

Toko CDP takes into account the problems and needs of the population in more than thirty (30) sectors with an estimated cost of eight thousand three hundred and nine million six hnudered and forty thousand francs (8.309.640.000 FCFA). This CDP is expected to be realized within six (06) Annual Investment Plans beginning with that of 2012 which is part of this document.

The Monitoring and Evaluation Plan includes a follow up team comprising competent and available individuals and a set of tools designed to facilitate their work.

A communication plan has been included to enable widening the circulation of the contents of this CDP.

The main challenge for the TOC lies in its outlook. The council executive (whether or not it changes after the upcoming municpal elections) should continue to play the pivotal role of mobilizing and organizing all stakeholders through inclusive strategies such that the vision of the municipality will be slowly but steadily attained.

 

 

2.0.     METHODOLOGY

2.1.    Preparatory Process

The preparatory process for the elaboration of the CDP of Toko council area involved several stakeholders and activities. It started with a two week training of key LSO personnel in Ekona which was facilitated by officials of the PNDP. The training ended with the signing of the execution contract between the council, the LSO and the PNDP South West Regional Coordination Unit. The training was thereafter restituted to other MUDEC research assistants while several brainstorming and planning sessions were held with Toko council management.  Secondary data on the socio economic and environmental situation within the municipality was collected and trianguted at the subdivisional, divisional and regional levels of technical services. The council guided by its LSO elaborated a sensitization campaign involving a combination of radio and Church announcements, banners, fliers and the village criers targeting stakeholders including traditional authorities, social and cultural groups, women and youth group representatives, the local heads of technical services, socio professional groups and international organizations operating within the municipality. All sensitization material carried the planning process as well as messages designed to heighten participation of all stakeholders. This process ended with the holding of the official launching workshop on the 5th of August 2011. MUDEC presented an elaborate program of the data to be collected at the council, urban space and in all villages per sector. A Steering Committee was proposed by the mayor and installed by the traditional authorities and the PNDP representatives. Their clearly defined terms of reference were presented to the villagers by the LSO. An expected result was for stakeholders to return with concise memories of their roles and responsibilities in the data collection process. The workshop had 114 participants who represented all shades of opinion within the municipality.

 

2.2.                        Collection  and Analysis of Information

Primary data was collected and diagnosed at three different levels namely; the Council Institutional Diagnosis (CID), the Urban Space Diagnosis (USD) and the Sectorial Village by Village Diagnosis. During the CID, researchers started with literature review by reading through council documents relating to financial, material and personnel matters. Interviews and focus group discussions were also conducted to enable the team update and triangulate information gathered. At the internal level of the CID, council service heads such as the Mayor, councilors, Secretary General, Civil Status Registrar and the Finance Clerk represented sources of information while at the external level traditional and religious authorities, VDC members, technical service heads, contractors, beneficiaries of council services and development partners such as KORUP and SITHE GLOBAL were interviewed. Through this method, descriptive data was collected on the systems, structures, staff, management style, culture of the council as well as established the strengths and weaknesses of the council. Data related to the level of interaction between development partners and the council was collected. Data was collected using a variety of tools including semi structured interviews, direct observations, focus discussions and questionnaires. All information collected was triangulated with other sources at the council, divisional or regional levels.

The USD was conducted in Madie I which is the commercial center and in Toko which is the seat of the local administration. Both locations are sparsely populated and have little to show  in terms of infrastructure. The services of local facilitators and the use of village criers contributed to the high rate of participation in almost all forty nine villages. Data was collected and analyzed using a variety of tools including participatory mapping, socio economic and environmental surveys and meetings with socio professional group representatives. Participants also engaged in transect walks, simple ranking, producing venn diagrams, focus group discussions and problem analysis using problem and objective trees. Waypoints were collected using the Global Positioning System (GPS). Interactive discussions, direct observations and site visits were also utilized in certain areas in the municipality. The historical timeline assisted participants to identify previous development efforts and their partners within the urban spaces.

The participatory village by village and sector by sector diagnosis covered 49 villages in the municipality including; Toko, Bweme, Mobenge, Ikoti I, Ikoti II,  Bekita, Bokuba, Iboko, Meangwe I, Bonabeanga, Basari,  Nwamoki, Iyombo, Ikoi,  Dikome,  Iwasa,  Ngamoki I,  Moboka, Madie, Madie New Town, Madie III Boembe, Mapanja (Ngamoki II), Mofako, Dienge, Dipundu , Tombe, Banyo, Ndoi,  Itali,  Debonda Koroki, Debonda Mosina, Masaka,  Bombangi, Babiabanga, Ipongi, Bareka II, Lobe Batanga, Baromba,  Bareka I, Manya,  Lipenja, Ikenge, Esukotan, Iyoe, Illondo, Kilekile, Mayeka,Esoki and Lowe.

A total of twelve researchers with clearly defined terms of reference were constitied into three teams of four individuals. They spent an average of three days per village in order to actually collect and diagnose information as prescribed in the PNDP methodology.

The village by village and sector by sector data collection and diagnosis (Problem Identification and Analysis) were participatory in that all the different stakeholders and all shades of opinion were given equal opportunities to make valuable comtributions. During plenary exercises men, women and youth collectively identified the core problems per sector which were later prioritized, analyzed and reformulated using problem and objective trees for causes and effects.

Participatory Rural Appraisal (PRA) methods with gender considerations were utilized to assemble field realities. These included: meetings, semi structured interviews, focus group discussions, participative mappings, transect walks, simple ranking, venn diagrams, and problem analysis using problem and objective trees.   Interactive discussions, direct observations and site visits were also utilized in certain areas in the municipality. Waypoints were collected using the Global Positioning System (GPS). Information collected was triangulated with various sources at the council, sub divisional, divisional and regional levels.

2.3.      Data Consolidation & Mapping

 

The consolidated data (presented on excel sheets) was analyzed using software that enabled us to generate tables, graphs, pie charts and bar charts. The GIS software also assisted in the production of geo referenced maps.

 

2.4.   Planning, Resource Mobilization & Programming Workshop.

During this workshop several activities were carried out including:

Restitution of  the diagnosis report by sector and by village ;

Restitution of the Logical Framework sector by sector;

Programming  and  Prioritisation of investments for the MITEF (3 years) and the AIP (first year) ;

Evaluation of  the environmental strategy of the AIP

Putting in place the Follow up Committee with ciear terms of reference with an annual work plan.

Elaboration of a contract award plan for the first year.

2.5.      Implementation of Participatory Monitoring and Evaluation Mechanism

 

A Steering Committee was constituted and installed by the Mayor in the presence of the Divisional Delegate of MINEPAT who sat in for the PNDP. There were seven members (three females) who were chosen because they indicated their willingness to be actively involved in the data collection process.

Steering Committee members:

NO Name Position Profession
01 Mr. Mindako Osih Chairperson Council Staff
02 Mrs. Bali Mispa Secretary Teacher
03 Mr. Ottu Raymond Member Councilor
04 Mr. Beyoko Jonathan Moki Member Councilor
05 Mrs. Ndede Mercy Member Farmer
06 Mrs. Ngembane Veronica Member Farmer
07 Mr. Esungu Wilson Member Councilor

Source : CID Survey  Sept. 2011

Steering Committee functions:

  Review the daily slates and action plans submitted by the LSO.

  Follow up the activities of the LSO in the various villages.

  Assure a healthy working relationship between the council, villages and the LSO
Hold monthly meetings and submit report with recommendations to the Mayor.

Make valuable inputs during plenary and validation meetings

2.0.                           BRIEF PRESENTATION OF THE COUNCIL AREA

 

2.1.            Description  of the municipality

3.1.1. The South West Region:

The South West Province was created by decree no 72/349 of June 1972 with Buea as its administrative headquarters. The 1996 Constitution (Article 61) created the regional system in Cameroon thus the current appellation of South West Region. It covers a surface area of 24,910 km2 (representing about 5.2% of Cameroon). Climatic conditions can be primarily divided into maritime and mountain. There is a wide disparity in the population of 1,361,981 persons (SOWEDA, 2010) with varied occupations and resources. The population density is 55 inhabitants per km2. There are six (06) administrative divisions and 32 sub divisions which are simple extensions of the State and enjoy neither financial nor legal autonomy and are dependent on the central government for all decisions. The division (Ndian) and Toko council which is the subject of this report are located within the South West Region.

3.1.2. Ndian Division:

Ndian division is one of six administrative units that constitute the South West Region with its headquarters in Mundemba. Ndian has a surface area of 6,165km2 (25% of the region). The population (17% urban and 83% rural) in 2010 was 118,465 comprising 63,065 women and 55,399 men (SOWEDA projections) representing a population density of about 22 inhabitants per km2. This is largely due to the inaccessibility and the unfertile soils. The division is very low and indented point of contact with the sea. It has an amphibious area dominated by mangroves and creeks which make it difficult to penetrate and cannot be accessed by land. The use of creeks and canals as means of transport is not regular. Numerous sandbanks render access to sea difficult and limit movement only through small boats. There is no drinking water during the dry season coupled with the lack of drugs, food, schools and administrative offices make life difficult. There is a lot of marine erosion going on in the delta zone of the Ndian River. The dense tropical forest with numerous rivers is located in the Toko area which is sparsely populated due to the undulating terrain, lack of roads and the presence of numerous conservation organizations.

3.1.3. Toko Council:

The council was created within the framework of decree no. 77/203 of 19th June 1977 to setup councils and define their boundaries. A Presidential decree in April 1995 created Toko District which was later upgraded to a sub division by another decree in 2010. It is bordered to the north by Dikume Balue, to the south by Eyumojock, to the east by Konye and Nguti and to the west by Mundemba. The village study (Aug. 2011) put the total population at fourteen thousand and forty five (14.045) inhabitants of whom there are 3.815 men and 4,480 women and 5,625 are children. Council authorities however contest these figures given that a council village by village population analysis through Village Development Associations put the figure in 2011 at sixty six thousand (66.000) inhabitants. The municipality has a total surface area of 103,413 hectares (1,034.13 km2) representing a population density of fifteen to thirty (15 to 30) inhabitants per km2 (source: South West Master Plan, 2004). This low population density in Toko is due to the dense tropical forest most of which are reserved. These include KORUP Park which occupies a surface area of 49,105 hectares (491.05 km2) which are dedicated primarily to conservation, research and tourism; the RUMPI Hills covers a surface area of 5,445 hectares (54.45 km2) and the Christian Philanthropic Community Forest covers a surface area of 4,928 hectares (49.28 km2). An organization from the United States of America called SG SOC has recently settled (and put in place a oil palms nursery) in Lipenja and is requesting 13,303 hectares (133.03 km2) of land. If granted these organizations will have control of more than 70% of the entire surface area of Toko municipality while the communities that are comprised of the Ngolos, Batangas or Bakokos will be left with about 30% of land on which to engage in farming and hunting. The municipality is endowed with natural resources including stones, rocks, sand deposits, timber (iroko, asube, njabe, mahogany, ebony, sapelle, obeche, bobinga, duzie), NTFP (bush mango, bush onion, febe etc) and wildlife.

Since its creation in 1992, Toko council has been administered by five (05) District Heads, one Divisional Officer and three (03) Mayors.

   3.1.4. Description of the Biophysical Environment

3.1.4.1. Climate

Toko municipality has an equatorial climate where there are two distinct seasons: a long rainy season of about eight months and a relatively shorter dry season of about four months.  The annual amount of rainfall ranges from 3500mm to 5000mm.The rainfall pattern provides suitable conditions for the growth of both perennial and annual crops thus allowing for two cropping seasons a year. Rainfall is a major determinant on agricultural production in terms of the crops grown, the farming system and the sequence and timing of farming operations.

Daily temperatures are relatively moderate throughout the year and ranges from 20°C to 30°C. Humidity varies with the absolute value and the seasonal distribution of rainfall, being uniformly moderate throughout the wet season, and falling to lower levels during the dry season

3.1.4.2.Soils

The Toko municipality has rich clay loam and lateritic soil type which is very fertile for agricultural production.  This has greatly influenced the cultivation of both cash and food crops. Due to poor farming techniques in the area, the soil is gradually losing its fertility.

 

3.1.4.3.Relief 

The topography is undulating with hills and slopes ranging from between 200 to about 1000m.  Hence, movement from one village to the other within municipality which is done primarily on foot as result of the poor road network is very difficult.

 

 

 3.1.4.4. Hydrology

The Toko council area has so many streams, springs and waterfalls which have direct bearings with the river Meme which takes it rise from the Rumpi Hills as it drains the highlands of Madie, Dikome Balue and the coastal lowlands of Mbonge in the Meme Division before emptying into the Atlantic Ocean. The Combrany River which originates from within Toko municipality also empties itself into the Meme River.  Thse features can serve as potential touristic sites within the municipality when developed. Despite the seemingly abundant availability of water, only three villages have made meaningful effort at having portable water supply including Madie Ngolo, Madie New Town and Toko. The rest of the population depends entirely on springs, sreams and rainfall as sources of drinking water.

 

 3.1.4.5. Vegetation and Fauna.      

The vegetation is characterised by the evergreen tropical forest most of which contains tree species of immense economic value. The Korup Project, Rumpi Hills and Philantropic forest reserves of the area contains a rich variety of flora and fauna. Many non-timber forest products are also found, including kola nuts and bush pepper, njansang, bitter cola and a variety of medicinal plants.

The difference in topography, vegetation and climate gives rise to a variety of both food and cash crops which includes; banana, cocoyams, maize, cassava, plantains cocoa, and oil palm. Copcoa is the main cash crop within the municipality.

Some of the animal species includes; elephants, monkeys and porcupines.

3.2.             Historical Profile

 3.2.1.Ethnic Groups and inter-ethnic relations

The indegenes of Toko municipality comprises the Ngolo, Batanga, and Bakoko. There are other migrants from different parts of the Cameroon such as the Bayangi, Dongolo, Bakundu and Grasslanders who are inter married and coexist in the municipality.

 

Table 1: Different Ethnic Groups within the municipality

No. Villages Main Ethnic group Ethnic group 1 Ethnic group  2 Ethnic group   3 Ethnic group 4
1 Madie Ngolo Ngolo (Ekama) Grassfielders Batanga
2 Madie New Town Ngolo (Ekama) Batanga
3 Madie III Boembe Ngolo (Ekama) Batanga
4 Banyo Ngolo
5 Iyombo Ngolo
6 Bonabeanga Ngolo
7 Mofako Batanga
8 Bweme Ngolo Dongolo Oroko
9 Dienge Ngolo
10 Ngamoki I Ngolo (Ekama)
11 Illondo Ngolo
12 Kilekile Ngolo
13 Iwasa Ngolo
14 Mapanja (Ngamoki II) Ngolo (Ekama)
15 Ikoi Ngolo
16 Iyoe Batanga
17 Mobenge Ngolo Oroko
18 Ndoi Ngolo
19 Dikome Ngolo Ngolo
20 Tombe Ngolo
21 Moboka Ngolo
22 Meangwe I Ngolo
23 Toko Ngolo Batanga Bakoko Orocko
24 Manya Ngolo
25 Mayeke Batanga
26 Bareka I Batanga
27 Basari Ngolo
28 Dipundu Batanga
29 Nwamoki Ngolo
30 Itali Batanga
31 Debonda II Batanga
32 Debonda I Batanga
33 Masaka Batanga
34 Bombangi Batanga
35 Ipongi Batanga
36 Babiabanga Batanga
37 Lobe Batanga Batanga
38 Bareka II Batanga
39 Betika Ngolo
40 Bokuba Ngolo
41 Iboko Ngolo
42 Lipenja Batanga Grassfielders
43 Baromba Batanga
44 Ikoti II Ngolo
45 Esoki Batanga
46 Lowe Batanga
47 Ikoti Ngolo
48 Ikenge Bakoko
49 Esukotan Bakoko Ngolo Bayangi Bakundu Grassfielders

Source: Village Survey (Aug. / Sept.  2011)

 

3.2.5.                                                                                                 3.2.2. Religion

Christianity is the predominant religion within Toko municipality and there is freedom of worship.  The main Christian denominations in the area are the Presbyterians and Pentacostals.

The Presbyterian Church in Cameroon contributes to the development of the municipality by providing basic health facilities through the Presbyterian Health Center at Madie Ngolo.

 

3.2.6.                                                                                               3.2.3.Mobility of the population

The rate of movement into and out of Toko Municipality is very low. This is due to a large extent to the absence of employment opportunities in the council area and the inaccessibility of villages within the municipality as a result of the poor road network. There are civil servants who have been transferred to the different schools and health centers within Toko sub division and who are hardly around due to the harsh living realities.

The rate of rural exudus is high as people, especially the youth move from the municipality to other sub divisions and cities either in search of jobs, better education (attend universities or professional schools) or to do business.

3.2.7.                                                                                             3.2.4. Size and structure of the population

The total population size of Toko municipality in 2010 was estimated at seven thousand and thirty five (7.035) inhabitants of whom there are 3.515 men and 3.520 women. (Source: Bureau of Census & Population Studies). But from field survey, the population was estimated to be 14.045 inhabitants of whom   are men 3815, women 4480 and 5625 being children.  

The municipality has a total surface area of 103,413 hectares (1,034.13 km2) representing a population density of fifteen to thirty (15 to 30) inhabitants per km2 (source: South West Master Plan). This low population density in Toko is due to the dense tropical forest most of which are reserved by development organizations.

The table below shows the structure of the population within the municipality.

Table 2: Population Densities by age group

No. Age bracket Total population
1 0—6 years

395

2 6—14 years

2,327

3 15—19 years

2,913

4 20—34 years

7,323

5 35—59 years

536

6 60+ years

551

  Total

14.045

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 3: Population distribution by gender in the Municipality

No. Village Men Women Children Total
1 Madie Ngolo

100

100

500

700

2 Madie New Town

80

85

200

365

3 Madie III Boembe

60

63

150

273

4 Banyo

30

40

57

127

5 Iyombo

93

30

40

163

6 Bonabeanga

8

6

11

25

7 Mofako

150

300

400

850

8 Bweme

21

16

24

61

9 Dienge

262

200

150

612

10 Ngamoki I

207

293

110

610

11 Illondo

7

19

39

65

12 Kilekile

16

18

30

64

13 Iwasa

120

150

105

375

14 Nwamoki

29

55

30

114

15 Mapanja (Ngamoki II)

200

250

515

965

16 Ikoi

150

250

145

545

17 Iyoe

9

12

43

64

18 Mobenge

17

34

34

85

19 Ndoi

92

100

65

257

20 Dikome Ngolo

150

62

85

297

21 Tombe

11

10

17

38

22 Moboka

100

150

261

511

23 Meangwe I

150

159

291

600

24 Toko

250

261

300

811

25 Manya

1

0

0

1

26 Mayeka

5

4

1

10

27 Bareka I

120

200

120

440

28 Itali

60

90

70

220

29 Debonda II

170

210

120

500

30 Debonda I

50

95

65

210

31 Masaka

5

9

49

63

32 Bombangi

50

74

78

202

33 Ipongi

53

55

117

225

34 Babiabanga

45

50

105

200

35 Lobe Batanga

15

30

22

67

36 Bareka II

30

27

61

118

37 Betika

157

93

150

400

38 Bokuba

51

100

49

200

39 Iboko

100

105

45

250

40 Lipenja

100

117

283

500

41 Boromba

1

0

0

1

42 Ikoti II Batanga

210

190

300

700

43 Esoki

45

20

60

125

44 Lowe

1

1

5

7

45 Ikoti

22

40

18

80

46 Ikenge

80

100

170

350

47 Esukotan

150

200

160

510

48 Basari

15

15

20

50

49 Dipundu

12

12

15

39

Total Population

3815

4480

5625

14.045

                 Source: Village Survey (Aug. / Sept.  2011)

 

From the analysis of the findings, men constitute 27% of the total population while women and children constitute 32% and 41% respectively. Persons of primary school age (6-14 years) represent 17 % of the population while individuals between the ages 20-34 make up 54% of the population thus indicating that Toko municipality has a very youthful population. This indicator is in line with the national trends in population.

 

3.1.4.                                                                                               3.2.5.Actors of Local Development

No Name Activities/ Sectors
01 KORUP Conservation, Scientific Research, Forestry, Culture, Tourism, Environment
02 SITHE GLOBAL (SG SOC) Agriculture, Commerce, Employment, Public Works, Transport
03 Christain Philantrophic Conservation, Scientific Research, Forestry, Culture, Tourism, Environment
04 RUMPI Conservation, Scientific Research, Forestry, Culture, Tourism, Environment

Source: Village Survey (Aug. / Sept.  2011)

 

3.2.             Main Potentials and Resources of the Council

The main assets and potentials within the municipality include numerious waterfalls, forest reserves, streams, rivers and caves.

Sector Assets Potentials  Constraints
Tourism and Leisure Waterfalls -Tourist sites

-Generate  Hydro electricity

-Inaccessible  road network- Poorly constructed bridges

–  Landslides

Caves -Tourist sites  -Inaccessible road network- Poorly constructed bridges

–  Landslides

Forestry and wildlife Rumpi  Hills -Monkeys, Alligatos, porcupines-Medicinal plants, NTFPs

-Timber

-Illegal exploitation of timber species-Illegal poaching
Korup Forest -Monkeys, Alligatos, alligators, elephants, Medicinal plants, NTFPs-Timber -Illegal exploitation of timber species-Illegal poaching
Christain Pillantropic forest -Monkeys, Alligatos, alligators, elephants- Medicinal plants, NTFPs

-Timber

-Illegal exploitation of timber species-Illegal poaching
Water and Energy Streams , Rivers, Springs, waterfalls -Sand extraction,-Fresh Water Sources -Drought-Pollution
Commerce SG SOC -Plantation Agriculture.Emploment Oppotunities -Landslides-Village Land Disputes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 4: Assest, Potentials and Constraints of the Biophysical Environment

 

3.3.            Socio Economic Infrastucture in the Municipality:

All villages within the municipality have a Palaver House (an Etane) which is used as a venue for conflict resolution and other social gatherings. Several of these structures are in very bad shape with no concrete floors, chairs, windows and doors. “Etanes” structures were identified in the following villages; Toko, Ikoti II, Bokuba, Iboko, Banobeanga, Basari, Nwamoki, Iyombo, Dikume, Iwasa, Ngamoki, Moboka, Madie I, II, III, Dienge, Bareka I, II, Lipenja, Ikenge, Esukotan, Kilekile, Esoki.

Meangwe I has a Catholic Church hall while Madie I has a Presbyterian Church hall.

 

4.0           SUMMARY OF DIAGNOSTIC RESULTS

4.1 . SWOT Analysis of Toko council

Strengths Weaknesses Opportunities Threats
  • Youthful and Committed Staff
    • Irregular Payment of staff salaries
    • Limited Delegation of Authority
    • Poor collaboration among council executive
    • General laxity at work (Deputies Mayors & SG are not always on seat)
    • Low rate of implementation of Municipal Decisions
    • Limited Flow of Information at all levels
    • Poor Filing System (No archives)
    • No Standard Operating Manuals and Procedures on Council Functioning
Tropical Forests with potentials for Research, Conservation, by International and National partners (Korup National Park, Rumpi Forest, Christian Philanthropic Forest. Non resident heads of technical services
v  Legal Entity with identified boundariesv  Regular Deliberations by at least 85% of Councilors
  • Poor Tax Base
  • Limited Cooperation between the Council and the business community
  • Inadequate strategies for revenue collection
Availability of touristic potentials e.g. waterfalls, caves, Eco Tourism Risky & undulating terrain
  • Standard Operating Procedure for Revenue Collection
    • No Policy on the use of council assets
    • Obsolete office equipment
Available Land for Agro Industrial Production (SG SOC) oil palm exploitation Rural Exodus for the youth
  • Available equipment such Tipper and 4×4 Hilux
  • Available Council Chambers

Available Council Real Estate

  • Non collaboration with business community and other development actors within the municipality
  • No Open Day programs between the population and the council.
  • No Policy for Public Private Partnerships within the municipality
Available Funding partners e.g. FEICOM, PNDP Poor Tax Base
  • Cordial Relationship with Supervisory Authority
Potentials for hire (payment) by the community.
  • No Municipal Treasurer
  • No clearly elaborated Job Descriptions for staff
  • No system of staff evaluation
  • No Gender Policy 
  • Absence of Staff Meetings
  • Under Staffed with limited knowledge on Council Management
  • Limited training opportunities for council staffs
  • Untrained Councilors
  • Non Functional Council Standing Committees

Fig. 5: Organizational Chart of TOC

Source: Village Survey (Aug. / Sept.  2011)

v  Based on the above structure, one can easily observe that Toko Council is a very small institution which is not capable of rendering the huge workload that is required of local councils within the dispensation of decentralization. When compared with the standard organizational structure proposed by MINATD (the Supervisory Authority), it becomes evident that the council urgently needs to build its capacity in several areas in order for it to play its pivotal role of fostering development within the municipality.

Toko council has twenty five (25) councillors including three (03) women who represent all forty nine (49) villages that constitute the municipality. Their professional backgrounds include farmers, nurses, businesspersons, teachers, drivers and hunters.The Council has four permanent committees including one each for Finance, Development, Infrastructure and All Purpose.

The executive organ constitutes of the Mayor and the two deputies none is a woman.

The council has very few staff including the Secretary General who is responsible for the overall coordination of the council’s administrative and technical services. She is the main collaborator with the council executive as well as the other services within the municipality.

The finance clerk is in charge of all financial records of the council. He also assists in keeping all financial records; draw up budgets and administrative accounts of the council.

 The Civil Status Registrar establishes marriage, birth and death certificates

The auxiliary staffs constitute the messenger and domestic servants who serve in the Mayor’s residence.

The Sub Treasurer (ST) is acting in the place of the Municipal Treasurer (MT) since the financial portfolio of the council does not qualify it to have its own treasurer.

Budget analysis of the council for 2008, 2009 and 2010 are presented below (Table 5):                                                                                                                               

Fiscal Period

Budget Amount

Overhead Costs

Investment

2008     108.730.000 FCFA

85.469.000 FCFA

23.261.000 FCFA

2009

108.730.000 FCFA

85.469.000 FCFA

23.261.000 FCFA

2010

106.260.000 FCFA

84.360.000 FCFA

21.900.000 FCFA

Source: Village Survey (Aug. / Sept.  2011)

 

Adminitrative accounts (actual)

Actual Situation

2008

2009

2010

Total Revenue

7.994.277 FCFA

7.106.835 FCFA

145.600.204 FCFA

Total Expenditure

7.880.185 FCFA

6.949.510 FCFA

140.175.910 FCFA

Surplus

114.092 FCFA

157.325 FCFA

5.424.294 FCFA

 

An overview of the existing financial records indicates that TOC has a very weak tax base which seriously puts to question the council’s ability to provide basic services to its population. The budget execution rate for 2008 and 2009 was less than 8%.   In 2010, the execution rate rose to 63% largely because of the transfer of funds from the Public Investment Budget (PIB).


4.3 Consolidated Problems and Needs per Sector

Sector

Core

Problem

Causes

Effects

Needs

Basic Education   Limited access to quality Basic Education
  • Insufficient qualified teaching staff
  • Insufficient classrooms
  • Insufficient  benches
  • Limited permanent classrooms
  • Limited access to didactic materials
  • No functional school libraries
  • No residence for staff
  • Insufficient latrines and water points in schools
  • High illitracy rate
  • Juvenile delinquency
  • Rural Exodus
  • Poor Results at Public Examinations
  • High rate of school dropouts
  • Construct permanent structures and additional classrooms in schools
  • Recruit qualified teaching personnel
  • Supply didactic materials and other school needs
  • Construct water points, latrines, fences, libraries
  • Initiate contacs with NBDC
Secondary Education   Limited access to quality Secondary Education
  • Insufficient number of secondary schools
  • Insufficient qualified teaching staff
  • No play groups in schools
  • Limited classroom equipment and furniture
  • Limited access to didactic materials (students and teachers)
  • No functional school libraries
  • No lantrines, fences and water points in schools
  • Low scolarisation rate
  • Poor performance of school
  • High rate of school drop outs
  • High rate of illitracy
  • Juvenile delinquency
  • High rate of prostitution
  • Rural exodus
  • Construct additional classrooms in schools
  • Recruit qualified teaching personnel
  • Supply didactic materials and other school needs
  • Construct water points, latrines, fences, libraries
  • Create a high school within the council area
  • Initiate contacts with NBDC

 

Public Health  Limited access to quality health care services
  • Insufficient health equipment for consultations, pharmacy, laboratory
  • Insufficient qualified medical personnel
  • Insufficient and inadequate coverage of community outreach programmes
  • Inadequate  health infrastructures
  • Long distance trek to existing  health units

 

  • High cost of health treatment
  • High prevalence of diseases
  • High infant mortality rate
  • High rate of rural exodus
  • Drop in per capital income
  • High cost of  expenditure
  • High death rate
  • Low standards of living
  • Recruit qualified medical personnel
  • Supply modern health equipment (beds, refrigerators, laboratory, drugs)
Water   Poor access to potable water
  • Insufficient potable water points
  • Inadequate alternative sources of potable water.
  • None functional pipe borne water supply
  • Long distance to fetch water in streams
  • Poorly treated available sources like the community wells
  • § High prevalence of water borne diseases
  • § High cost to treat related water borne diseases
  • § Drop in per capital income
  • § Low standards of living
  • § Construct more water schemes in more villages
  • § Rehabilitate existing water points In Madie and Toko
  • § Initiate contacts with OSRI
Energy  Poor access to electricity supply
  • None functional thermal electricity plants  in Toko and Madie Ngolo
  • No connection to the national electricity supply network (AES SONEL)
  • None functional maintenance committees for community generators
  • High cost to maintain  community generators
  • § Difficulty using electrical appliances
  • § High incidence in  health hazards like eye problems
  • § Difficulties for students  to study  at night
  • § High rate of insecurity
  • § Difficulty managing perishable foods
  • § Rehabilitate  electrification networks in in Toko and Madie Ngolo
  • Extension of AES SONEL  from Mundemba to Toko
Public Works   Poor state of rural road network
  • None maintenance of earth roads
  • Poor  state of culverts and bridges
  • Insufficient farm to market roads
  • Poor community mobilization
  • None existence of road maintenance committees
  • High cost of transportion
  • Limited circulation of persons, good and services
  • Rural exodus
  • Overloading of persons on clandestine vechicles
  • Drop in per capital income
  • Drop in living standards
  • High rate of accidents
  • Constant maintenance of existing road network
  • Construct bridges and culverts
  • Extend road network to other villages
  • Aquire front head loader
  • Rehabilitate council tipper
  • Initiate contacts with OSRI
Women Empowerment and  the Promotion of the Family   Marginalisation of women and children
  • Absence of social structures
  • Insufficient  facilities fo r women focused activities
  • Weak economic power of women
  • Insufficient and inadequate representation and participation of women in development and political issues
  • Ignorance of women on their rights
  • Under scholarisation of the girl child
  • Absence of  gender policy
  • Insufficient opportunities for the women and the girl child
  • High dependence rate of women
  • High prevalence  of early births for the girl child
  • High prevalence of abandoned children
  • High prevalence of early girl child marriages
  • Mobilize and sensitize on gender equality and related topics
  • Train administrative and council authorities on gender mainstreaming
  • Equip Home Economics Center in Toko.
  • Sensitize and train on women’s rights and the family
  • Train and support women on income generating activities
  • Initiate contacts with REACH OUT, Cameroon
Commerce  InsufficientBusiness and commercial activities
  • Insufficient market facilities
  • Poor information on prices of goods in other areas
  • Poor road network
  • Insufficient financial institutions
  • High price speculation on products
  • Insufficient revenue
  • Risk of diseases and loss of goods
  • Exploitation of the communities by traders (buyam-sellams)
  • Construct modern periodic market in Madie
  • Improve on Market in Toko Information Systems
  • Regularly maintain road network
  • Initiate contacts with SG SOC & KORUP
  • Activate Toko Village Bank
  • Lobby for Installation of Micro finance institution
Agriculture and Rural Development Low  agricultural production / productivity
  • § High cost of farm inputs
  • § Inadequate technical know how
  • § Pest and diseases attack on cocoa (black pod)
  • § Limited access to improved planting materials
  • Insufficient and inadequate transport facilities
  • § Limited access to agricultural equipment and inputs
  • § Insufficient training of farmers
  • § Low financial capacity on producers
  • § Insufficient technical personnel
  • § Limited access to training opportunities
  • § No storage facilities
  • § Drop in agricultural out put
  • § Low  revenue
  • § Poor living standards
  • § Low purchasing power
  • § Low harvest
  • § High post harvest losses
  • § Rural Exodus
  • § Organize trainings on modernmproduction techniques and agricultural inputs utilisation
  • § Provide modern farming equipment   to farmers
  • § Recruit trained agricultural personnel
  • § Provide modern storage facilities for perishable products
  • § Create and constantly maintain farm to market roads
  • § Network with KORUP Management Plan
  • § Network with SG SOC Management Plan
  • § Network with Christain Philantrophic Management Plan
Livestock, Fisheries and Animal Industries Low livestock and fisheries production/productivity
  • High cost of animal feed
  • Poor techniques of animal rearing (free range)
  • Inadequate technical know how.
  • Poor methods on animal reariing
  • Limited access to livestock technical services.
  • Fish Poisoning
  • § High rate of diseases outbreaks
  • § Limited Production of high  breed  animal species
  • § Low intake of protein
  • § Reduced revenue
  • § Low standards of living

 

  • Organize capacity buiding for animal breeders
  • Restructure  CIGs
  • Assist animal farmers with seed capital.
  • Initiate contacts with HPI
State Property and Land Tenue  High insecurity of state property and land
  • Limited number of title deeds for state and private property
  • Cultural limitations
  • Poor community sensitisation on the importance of land titles and how to go about it
  • § Illegal possession of land
  • § Conflicts between individuals and  neighbouring villages
  • § Create Sub delegation in the municipality
  • § Facilitate access to title deeds.
  • § Sensitize population on land issues.
Housing and Urban Development   Poor Town Planning
  • Construction of housing using local and temporal materials
  • Poor financial capacity of the population
  • Insecurity of occupied land
  •  Limited access to a communal electrification network
  • Absence of urban development and housing facilities
  • Absence of a Council Plan for villages
  • Absence of waste management plan
    • Haphazard building of houses
    • Poor construction of houses
    • Absence of vision and consciousness on construction of modern houses
    • High rate of water borne diseases
    • High rate of fire disasters
    • High rate of promiscuity
    • High rate of accidents
    • § Create and institute functional communal electricity and pipe borne water networks
    • § Elaborate Town plan
    • § Facilitate access to construction and building materials/equipment
Environment, Nature Protection and Sustainable Development High rate of Environmental degradation
  • High rate of water pollution
  • Poor management of natural resources
  • High rate of timber exploitation by illegal exploiters
  • Poor drainage system
  • § Displacement and extinction of animal  species
  • § High rate of erosion
  • § High incedent of climate change
  • § Increase rate of pollution
    • Encourage tree planting
    • Sensitize on the impact on environmental issues
Forestry and Wildlife  High rate of forest exploitation
  • Illegal exploitation of the forests  for timber
  • Illegal hunting in the forest
  • Poor knowledge of forestry laws
  • Insufficient Forest controlers
  • Absence of a structure for the forestry post.
  • § Dissapearance of certain species
  • § Destruction of biodiversity
  • § Climate change
  • Displacement of animal species
  • § Construct forestry post
  • § Increase number of technical staff in the forestry post
  • § Sensitize on the forestry laws
Territorial Administration and Decentralization  Insufficient local administrative services
  • Unavailable  personnel
  • Insufficient equipment
  • Limited collaboration with VTC
  • Slow classification of Chiefs
  • High  costs associated with administrative services
  • § High rate of rural exodus
  • § Drop in population
  • § Reduced trust of local administration
    • Transfer personnel and supply working equipment
    • Speed up process of classifying Chiefs
    • Develop confidence building measures and Sensitize population
Higher Education Inaccessibility to higher education
  • Absence of  professional education facilities
  • Insufficient  financial resources of parents

 

  • Difficult access to socio-professional training
  • High educational fees
  • Abandonment of studies
  • Juvenile delinquency
  • Under-development
  • Insufficient number of educated elites
  • § Offer scholarships to youths who have completed secondary education
Social Affairs   Insufficient social services and empowerment of vulnerable persons
  • Non existence of a data base of vulnerable persons
  • Absence of social centre and other infrastructure
  • None existence of social workers
  • Psychological trauma
  • Juvenile delinquency
  • Construct social centre
  • Recruit social workers to be at their disposal and to offer psycho-social assistance to them when need be
  • Establish lists of vulnerables.
  • Initiate contacts with REACHOUT
 Youth and Citizen Education

 

Insufficient youth empowerment facilities and programmes
  • Insufficient trainers and youth animators
  • Limited entrepreneural capacities
  • Limited access to funding youth interests
  • High illiteracy rate
  • Absence of youth empowerment structures and services
  • Limited mobilization of youths on income generating activities
  • § High rate of unemployment
  • § High illitracy rate
  • § Juvenile  delinquency
  • § High rate of teenagers pregnancies
  • § High prevalence and spread of HIV and AIDS
  • § High rate of rural exodus
  • § Increase sensitization of youths on different opportunities available
  • § Create  functional youth empowerment centres
  • § Recruit youth trainers and animators
Sports and Physical Education  Insufficient  sporting activities
  • Insufficient sporting activities
  • Insufficient sport equipment in schools
  • Insufficient sport teachers in the different schools
  • § Low rate of physical exercise
  • § Poor development of sports and leisure disciplines
  • § Absence of sport organisations
  • § Insufficient  sport competitions
  • § Construct a sports complex
  • § Institute Proper management of the available sports facilities
  • § Employ sport teachers in schools
  • § Organize local  sporting activities
Transport Poor means of  transportation
  • Non existence of transport agencies in the municipality
  • Non existent transporters union
  • High cost of transport
  • Poor state of roads
  • Poor state of vehicles
  • Overloading of vehicles  and motor bikes
  • High rate of accidents
  • Inadequate circulation of persons and goods
  • Low economic activities
  • Drop in the labor force
  • High cost of transport
  • Rural exudos
  • Reorganize rural transportation network
Employment and Vocational Training  High rate of unemployment
  • Absence of a vocational training center
  • Insufficient  employment opportunities
  • High illitracy rate
  • Absence of professional training for potential job seekers
  • Absence of professional training schools
  • § High rate of illegal activities
  • § Juvenile delinquency
  • § High crime wave
  • § Construct SAR-SM and a professional training centre
  • § Support self employment through supply of seed capital
Small and Medium size Entreprises, Social Economy and Handicraft Insufficient actors in the informal sector 

 

  • Ignorance on procedures and formalities on enterprises creation
  • Limited opportunities for (mechanics, tailoring, panel beating/welding etc)
  • Weak vision and entrepreneurial capacity
  • Low capacity and skills of the population
  • Slow and weak promotion of the sector
  • High prices for basic services
  • High taxes for existing enterprises
  • Weak economic power of the population and the council
  • Insufficient revenue collection and diversification strategies
  • Create enabling environment to attract informal sector actors
  • Sensitize on small and medium size enterprises services
  • Support creation  of small and medium size enterprises and related services
Scientific Research and Innovation  Limited access to scientific innovations
  • Absence of research facilities (structures, personnel, equipment)
  • Poor dissemination of scientific innovations
  • Poor policy formulation and programming by the state with petroleum companies
  • Little or no information on agro pastoral innovations
  • Limited access to improved planting materials
  • Poor promotion of sectoral activities
  • Low quality of agricultural / Livestock products
  • Rudimentary production techniques
  • Poor production
  • Low revenues
  • High poverty rates
  • Train local community researchers
  • Institute Award of best innovative research projects
  • Carry out research on other  potentials
  • Initiate contacts with research departments of KORUP and PAMOL.
Tourism and Leisure  Poor development of touristic potentials
  • Absence of touristic infrastructures
  • Poor development of touristic sites
  • Enclavement of the communities
  • Poor Road network
  • § Poor attraction of tourists
  • § Poor economic power of the population and the communities
  • § Limited benefite from Pro Poor Tourism activities
  • § Develop touristic sites
  • § Construct touristic infrastructures (hotels, restaurants and guest houses)
  • § Maintain road network
Arts and Culture    High rate of deterioration of cultural values
  • § Absence of  community halls
  • § Poor development and promotion of cultural initiatives
  • § Poor socio-cultural infrastructure
  • § Poor financial and organisational capacity
  • § Poor community  mobilisation
  • § Non-binding decisions of ‘Palavar Houses’
  • § Loss of cultural values
  • § No cultural contribution in the economic growth of   communities
  • § Rural Exodus
  • § Construct community halls
  • § Organize cultural events
  • § Construct cultural Shrines

 

Industry, Mines and Technological Development Limited Development of the mining /  industrial sector
  • No feasibility studies carried out in this sector
  • Absence of trainings
  • Poor sensitization of the population
  • Absence of mining and industrial serctor policy

 

  • Poor conception of development plans
  • Over exploitaton of resources
  • None financing of micro projects by companies
  • Weak economic power of the council and population
  • High rate of poverty in the communities
  • Conduct feasibility study on existing minerals within the municipality.
  • Organize a Toko Development Conference
Post and Telecommunications  Difficult access to information and postal services
  • Poor access to Radio,  TV and internet signals
  • Poor Mobile Telecommunication network
  • Absence of Community radio station

 

  • § Population is less informed
  • § Poor exposure to the outside world
  • § Difficulties in communicating with people within and out of the community
  • § High rate of unemployment
    • § Installradio and TV network antennas
    • § Establish Community radio
    • § Institute Mobile Telecommunication net works
Labour and Social Security  High rate of Job insecurity
  • Insufficient number of stabilised entreprises and organisations
  • Poor organisation and structuring of self employment
  • High taxes
  • Poor sensitisation
  • § Poor participation in development activities
  • § High rate of poverty
  • § High rate of rural exodus
    • § Attract enterprises in the municipality
    • § Sensitize on the rights of the employee
Public Security  High rate of insecurity
  • No resident public security staff
  • No permanent security offices
  • Refusal of transferred staff to reside in the municipality
  • High rates of unprosecuted domestic desputes
  •   High crime wave
  •  Create public security post
  • Transfer security staff
  • Construct houses for security staff
Communication  Poor communication networks
  • Poor access to Cameroon TV and Radio signals
  • Poor lobbying capacity
  • No community radio
  • Poor initiation of community radio project
  • Poor circulation of newspapers
  • No newspaper agents
  • Poor circulation of information
  • Limited access to development programmes
  • Limited access to world events
  • Install CRTV antenna
  • Create community radio
  • Install news paper vendors

4.4. Table of Priority Projects per Village in the key Social Sectors

(villages with similarly ranked prioritized projects have been

grouped together)

Villages Sector Micro-projects in order of priority Estimated Costs (pending feasibility studies)
 

Toko, Meangwe I, Bonabeanga, Bweme

 

 Water and Energy  Rehabilitate and extend thermal electricity plant

 24.000.000

Rehabilitate and extend water scheme

50.000.000

Public Health Equip the health centre with essential drugs and equipment

8.000.000

Arts & Culture Construction of a community hall for cultural manifestation

10.000.000

Commerce Equip market with lock up stores

10.000.000

Basic Education Equipment and furniture in GS (pupil desks, table’s chairs for teachers)

30.000.000

Secondary Education Construction of four classrooms to GSS and supply of didactic materials

36.000.000

Public Works Rehabilitate road network

200.000.000

Madie I, II & III Water and Energy  Rehabilitate and extend thermal electricity plant

24.000.000

Rehabilitate and extend water scheme

50.000.000

Public Works Rehabilitate road network

200.000.000

Basic Education Equipment and furniture (pupil desks, table’s chairs for teachers)

30.000.000

Secondary Education Construction of four classrooms to GSS and supply of didactic materials

36.000.000

Culture Construct a community hall for cultural manifestations

10.000.000

Commerce Construct a modern permanent  market

30.000.000

Public Health Supply of basic health equipment and drugs to health center

10.000.000

Mofako, Iyoe, Basari, Dipundu, Ilondo, Lowe Public Health Construction of a  health centre and   public toilets

30.000.000

Basic Education Construction of  8 classrooms to four GSs  and supply didactic materials

107.800.000

Water and Energy Install water scheme

50.000.000

Install thermal electricity

38.500.000

Public Works Maintenance of existing road network and rehabilitation of culverts and bridges

72.000.000

Commerce Construction of a modern permanent  market

30.000.000

Dienge, Iwasa, Ikoi, Ndoi, Culture Construct community hall for cultural manifestations

10.000.000

Water and energy Construct a water scheme with gravity

50.000.000

Install thermal electricity

38.500.000

Basic Education Construction of four additional classrooms in  two GSs and supply of didactic materials and teachers tables and chairs

76.500.000

 Public Health Construct and equiped  health centre

20.000.000

Public Works Rehabilitation  of the road network

6.000.000

Ngamoki, Nwamoki Water and Energy Install water scheme

50.000.000

Install thermal electricity

38.500.000

Public Health Construction health center and equip   with basic essential  drugs

30.000.000

Public Works Rahabilitate existing road network

72.000.000

Commerce Construct  market

20.000.000

Esukotan, Ikenge, Banyo Water and Energy Install 3 thermal electricity plants

34.000.000

Install 3 water schemes

100.000.000

 Public Health Construct and equip  health centre (2)

50.000.000

Basic Education Rehabilitation of classrooms and supply of didactic materials

50.000.000

Public Works Rehabilitate road network

102.000.000

Employment & VocationalTraining Construct and equip SAR SM and make functional

50.000.000

Lipenja, Ikoti I, Ikoti II, Esoki Public Health Rehabilitate  and equip  health centre

20.000.000

Water Install water scheme

38.500.000

Energy Install 3 thermal electricity plants

34.000.000

Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network

106.000.000

Basic Education Construction of additional 3 classrooms and supply with teacher desks

24.000.000

Secondary Education Construct 2 classrooms for GTC

18.000.000

Culture Construct a community hall for cultural manifestations

10.000.000

Commerce Construct modern  market

20.000.000

 Bareka I & II, Betika, Bokuba, Iboko Water and Energy Install water schemes and form  functional management committee

107.000.000

Install thermal  electricity plants (2)

38.500.000

Public Health Construction of health center

26.000.000

Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network

50.000.000

Basic Education Construction of 6 classrooms and equip with  teachers desk and didactic materials

72.000.000

Culture Construct  3 community halls for cultural manifestation,

30.000.000

Masaka, Lobe, Tombe, Mayeke Water and Energy Install water schemes and form  functional management committee

50.000.000

Install thermal  electricity plants (4)

50.000.000

 Public Health Construction of health centre and equip   with basic essential  drugs

30.000.000

Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network

50.000.000

 Basic Education Construction of 4 additional classrooms

42.000.000

Dikome Ngolo, Mapanja, Dibonda I & II, Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network and construction of culverts/bridges

106.000.000

Water and Energy Supply  of a potable water scheme

50.000.000

Install thermal electricity (3)

50.000.000

Public Health Rehabilitate health centre

36.000.000

Basic Education Construction of 6 addition classrooms in GS Dikome, Mapanja and Dibonda

92.000.000

Bobangi, Ipongi, Babianga, Kile Kile, Mobenge Water  and Energy Supply of  pipe borne  water scheme by gravity

105.000.000

Install thermal electricity (3)

50.000.000

Culture Construct 3 community halls for cultural manifestations

45.000.000

Public Works Rehabilitate existing road network

106.000.000

Commerce Construct modern  market

30.000.000

 

5.0.               STRATEGIC PLANNING

5.1 Vision and Objective of the Communal Development Plan

 

 

The Vision

“Toko Council and the population enjoy a healthy relationship in which a well maintained road network links all villages with improved social infrastructure including electricity, water, health and education.”

 

 

  The Objective

 

“Toko Council continuously strives toward improving the life styles of the population through the effective and efficient supply of basic services in the domains of health, education and socio economic infrastructure.”

 

5.2 LOGICAL FRAMEWORK BY SECTOR

WOMEN EMPOWERMENT AND THE PROMOTION OF THE FAMILY:

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Decision making by women improved At least 50% of women take decisions on matters that concern them by 2020. – Testimonies- Administrative reports Negative cultural practices against women reduced.
Specific objective Marginalization of women and children reduced By 2015 at least 50% of women are empowered personally, economically, socially, culturally and politically. – Administrative reports-  Testimonies Male subordination reduced
Results 1. Economic power of women increased At least 40% of women embark on profitable income generating activities by 2015. – Business records- Administrative reports Favourable economic conditions
2. Representation and participation of women in development and political issues increased. By 2015, at least 50% of members in development and political committees are women –  Administrative reports-Testimonies – Negative socio-cultural biases.-  Inferiority complex of women reduced.
3. Ignorance of women on their rights reduced By 2015, at least 50% of the women in the municipalities know their rights and apply them – Testimonies-  Reports Male subordination reduced
4. Level of education for women increased At least 20% of young girls enroll in schools at all levels yearly. School enrollment registers Negative cultural practices reduced

 

PUBLIC WORKS :

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Circulation of goods and persons increased By 2020 transport means increase in the municipality yearly by at least 15% –          Traffic counts-          Testimonies Stable economic  environment
Specific objective Rural roads network improved By 2020, at least 30% of the communities  are accessible all seasons –          Transport record-          Testimonies

–          Visits

–          Community collaboration-          Stable economic environment
Results 1. Farm to market roads increased By 2020, at least 40km of roads constructed, regularly maintained and accessible all seasons. –          Administrative reports-          Visits –          Community collaboration-          Stable economic environment
2. Conditions of existing roads improved At least 30km of existing roads are regularly maintained and accessible all seasons by 2015 –          Visits-          Administrative reports Community collaboration
3. State of culverts and bridges improved 25% of broken down culvers and bridges are rehabilitated and used by 2015 –          Visits-          Testimonies Community collaboration

 

ENERGY RESOURCES :

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Lighting of communities improved By 2020, at least 30% of communities in the municipality are regularly supplied with electricity –          Public interviews-          Administrative reports

–          Observations

Favourable economic and political environment
Specific objective Access to electricity supply increased At least 20% of the population use electricity for lighting of their houses and businesses by 2015 –          Business record-          Interviews Favourable economic and political environment
Results 1. Thermal electricity plants in Toko and Madie Ngolo made functional By 2015, two thermal electricity plants in Toko and Madie Ngolo are maintained regularly, and supply electricity throughout. –          Observations-          Testimonies

–          Administrative reports

Stable economic environment
2.   Community generators increased and functional At least 20 community generators installed and functional by 2015. –          Testimonies-          Observations Community collaboration
3. Connection to the national electricity supply network (AES SONEL) enhanced By 2015, Toko town has functional AES SONEL installations –          Administrative report-          Public interviews Stable political environment

 

 

WATER RESOURCES :

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Prevalence of water born diseases reduced By 2020, the  number of reported cases of water borne diseases reduce by at least 50% in all the communities with portable water –          Health centre records-          Testimonies Water pollution reduced
Specific objective Access to potable water increased At least 10 communities have  access to potable water by 2020 –          Administrative reports-          Visits

–          Testimonies

Favourable policy framework
Results 1. Potable water schemes increased At least 10 communities have functional portable water schemes by 2020 –          Site visits-          Administrative reports An enabling economic and political conditions
2. Functional water schemes increased All existing water schemes are maintained regularly and functional by 2015. –          Site visits-          Administrative reports An enabling economic and political conditions
3. Contamination of available water sources reduced. At least 20% of water sources in the municipality are good for drinking by 2015 –          Testimonies-          Site visits

–          Council reports

Community collaboration

 

 SECONDARY EDUCATION :

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Global objective Illiteracy rate at the secondary level reduced By 2020, literacy rate increased by at least 20% in the municipality –          Administrative and management reports Favorable policy framework
Specific objective Access to quality secondary education increased At least 60% of pupils from primary school have access to secondary education and at least 60% obtain 4 “O” level subjects or more by 2015 –          GCE ‘O’ level results-          Administrative and management report Favorable economic and political environment
Results 1. Qualified teachers increased By 2015 each secondary schools have at least 10 qualified teachers –          Transfer decision-          Administrative and management report Favorable economic and political environment
2. Infrastructure increased All secondary and technical schools have at least five classroom blocks, a water point, a latrine, a library and workshop  by 2015. –          Visit to schools-          Administrative and management reports Favorable economic conditions
3. Equipment increased By 2015, all classrooms constructed are equipped with desks, chairs, tables & blackboards –          Visits to schools-          Inventory record Favorable economic conditions

 

BASIC EDUCATION :

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Global objective Illiteracy rate at the basic level reduced By 2020 at least 70% of children (half of them girls between the ages of 12 – 14) obtain F.S.L.C –          Reports of the inspectors of basic education-          F.S.L.C results –          Favourable policy framework-          Favourable economic and political environment
Specific objective Access to quality basic education increased By the year 2020 at least 80% of the children (half of them girls) within the municipality have access to quality basic education –          F.S.L.C results-          Administrative and management reports –          Favourable policy framework-           Favourable economic and political environment
Results 1. Qualified teachers increased At least 90% of nursery and primary schools have at least four functional qualified teachers by 2015. –          Transfer decisions-          Administrative and management reports –          Favourable policy framework-           Favourable economic and political environment
2. School infrastructure increase (classroom, latrines, libraries, water points, staff residence) At least 70% of nursery and primary schools in the municipality have at least four classrooms, a water point, a latrine and a library by 2015. –          Visit to schools-          Administrative and management report Favourable economic conditions
  3.  School equipment / materials increased By 2015 at least 70% of classrooms constructed are fully equipped with desks, chairs, tables, boards and required didactic materials yearly.  –          Visit to schools-          Administrative and management repor Favourable economic conditions

 

 PUBLIC HEALTH :

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Global objective Health status improved By 2015, the death rate reduces by a least 30% each year. –   Health centre records-   Testimonies –          Economic and political stability.-          Epidemic reduced
Specific objective Access to quality health services improved By 2015 at least 60% of the population have access to quality health services –   Health centre records-   Testimonies Cooperation of stakeholders
Results 1. Health infrastructure increased By 2015, all health centers created are constructed according to required specifications –   Visit to health centres-   Health centre reports Favourable economic and political environment
2. Health equipment increased (beds, delivery beds and kits, laboratory equipment etc) By 2020, all health centers have at least 50% of required basic equipment –   Visit to health centres.-   Inventory record Favourable economic and political environment
3.  Access to quality and affordable essential drugs increased All health centers have pro-pharmacies with regular supply of essential drugs by 2015 –   Visit to health centre and pro-pharmacy-   Testimonies Favourable economic and political environment
4.  Qualified health personnel increased By 2015 all centres have at least 3 functional qualified staff –   Health centre reports-   Transfer decisions Favourable policy framework

  

 COMMERCE :

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Global objective Commercial activities  increased within the municipality By 2014, revenue of the council  from commercial activities increase by at least 15% annually –          Accounts document-          Testimonies Favorable taxation policy
Specific objective Commercial activities increased Diversified commercial activities increase by at least 30% by 2015 –          Visit to business places-          Council revenue reports Enabling business climate
Results 1. Micro – enterprises increased At last 50 lucrative micro – enterprise exists by 2015 –          Visit to market-          Council report Favorable economic environment
2. Marketing of products improved By 2015 at least 70% of the population market their products in appropriate environment and fetch good prices –          Interviews with market masters.-          Radio announcements on market prices Availability of funds ensured
Commercial activities  increased within the municipality By 2014, revenue of the council  from commercial activities increase by at least 15% annually –          Visit to micro-finance-          Testimonies Laws establishing micro-finance institutions respected

 

AGRICULTURE AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT:

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Global objective Agricultural products regularly available in the municipality Varieties of agricultural products available in the municipality all cropping seasons by 2015 –          Administrative reports-          Testimonies Favorable climatic conditions
Specific objective Agricultural production and productivity increased By 2015 at least 40% of farmers increase their yields by at least 10% yearly –          Farm visits-          Farm record

–          Administrative reports

Epidemic outbreak reduced
Results 1. Pests and diseases attack on cocoa (black pod) reduced At least 20% reduction in losses due to pests and diseases attack by 2015 –          Farm records / visits-          Administrative reports Favorable prices for fungicides and pesticides
2. Use of improved planting materials increased By 2013 at least 40% of farmers use improved planting materials yearly and experience an increase in yields, –          Farm record-          Administrative report s Timely availability of improved planting materials
3.  Use of fertilizers increased (organic and inorganic) By 2015, at  least 30% of farmers use organic and inorganic fertilizers and increase their yields by at least 10% yearly. –          Farm record-          Administrative reports Favorable prices for inorganic fertilizers
4.  Farming practices improved By 2014 at least 30% of farmers practice improved farming techniques –          Farm visit administrative reports Bush fire reduced
  5. Post harvest losses reduced By 2014 at least 30% of farmers reduce post harvest losses by at least 50% –          Administrative reports-          Interviews Rural road network improved

 

 

LIVESTOCK :

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Global objective Nutritional conditions of the population improved At least 40% of the population increase protein intake by at least 10% annually –          Testimonies-          Health record Epidemic outbreak reduced
Specific objective Livestock production and productivity increased By 2020 at least 30% of the population keep livestock and increase production by at least 10% yearly –          Farm record-          Administrative reports Epidemic outbreak reduced
Results 1.  Livestock production practices improved At least 50% of livestock farmers practice improved breeding techniques by 2015 –          Farm visits Epidemic outbreak reduced
2. Use of improved livestock breed increased By 2015 at least 60% of farmers use improved livestock breed and increase the production –          Farm visits-          Administrative reports Favourable economic environment
3. Use of quality livestock feed increased By 2015 at least 50% of farmers use quality livestock feed and increase their production by at least 5% –          Farm record-          Administrative reports Favourable prices for livestock feed
4. Rate of diseases incident reduced By 2015, disease attack on animals reduce by at least 3% annually –          Farm record-          Administrative reports Epidemic outbreak reduced

 

 FISHERIES : 

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Global objective Nutritional intake of the population improved By 2015 at least 30% of the population increases their protein intake by at least 10% yearly. –          Testimonies-          Health record Stable economic environment
Specific objective Fish production and productivity  increased By 2015, the fishing population increase their harvest by at least 3% annually –          Administrative reports Fish poisoning reduced
Results 1.  Sustainable Fish harvesting methods increased By 2015, at least 50% of fish harvesting is done with improved equipment –          Visit to fishing  sites-          Administrative reports Environmental laws respected
2. Fish pond increased At least 4 functional fish pond exist in the municipality by 2015 –          Visit to fish pond-          Administrative reports Stable economic environment

 

STATE PROPERTY AND LAND TENURE:

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Global objective Security of State and Private properties improved. By 2015 at least 40% of state property and land  secured –          Visits-          Administrative reports –          Favourable land tenure policy.-          Enabling political and economic climate
Specific objective Legal possession of land increased. By 2015 at least 30% of Government property are in good state with reduced  illegal possession –          Visits-          Land certificates

–          Administrative reports

–          Favourable land tenure policy.-          Favourable political and economic climate
Results 1. Title deeds for state and private land increased. At least 20% of land have land certificates and are developed by 2015 Land certificates Conflict management ensured
2. Management of state property and land occupied improved By 2015, a management plan is developed and implemented by all stakeholders. Management plan Collaboration of all stakeholders

 

 

HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT:

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Master plan for the municipality developed At least 3 major towns in the municipality have master plans by 2015 –          Town visit-          Administrative reports Collaboration between council and urban development and housing
Specific objective Town planning improved By 2015, the towns of Toko, Madie 1 and Lipenja are well presented with streets –          Town visit-          Administrative reports Collaboration between council and urban development and housing
Results 1. Master plans of the municipality made available Master plans of Toko, Madie 1 and Lipenja put in place and used by 2013 –          Master plan-          Administrative reports Collaboration between council and urban development and housing
2.  Construction of houses using permanent materials increased At least 30% of the houses in the municipality are permanent structures by 2015 –          Permits-          Council reports Collaboration between council and urban development and housing
3.  Haphazard building of houses reduced At least 40% of the population construct their houses with building permits by 2015 –          Town visits-          Council reports Favorable economic conditions

 

 

ENVIRONMENT, NATURE PROTECTION AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT:

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Rate of pollution reduced Water and air pollution reduce in the municipality by at least 20% by 2015 –          Site visits-          Administrative reports Environmental laws respected
Specific objective Environmental degradation reduced Environmental degradation due to human practices reduce by at least 20% by 2015 –          Site visits-          Testimonies

–          Administrative reports

–    Environmental laws respected-    Community collaboration
Results 1. Management of natural resources improved At least 20% of natural resources are sustainably managed by 2015 –          Visits to forests, water sources and famers-          Administrative reports –    Environmental laws respected-    Community collaboration
2.  Waste management improved By 2014 a functional waster management system is put in place –          Town visits-          Council reports Community collaboration
3.  Drainage system improved By 2014, drainage systems are constructed, functional and regularly maintained –          Site visits-          Council reports –    Favorable economic conditions-    Community collaboration

 

 FORESTRY AND WILDLIFE :

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Extinction of forest resources reduced By 2015, destruction of biodiversity reduced by at least 20% –   Administrative report-   Visits to forest –    Forest laws respected-     Fire disasters reduce
Specific objective Management of forest resources improved By 2015 at least 50% of the population practice sustainable forest management techniques –   Site visits-   Administrative report

 

–    Forest laws respected 
Results 1. Illegal exploitation of timber reduced By 2015, Illegal exploitation of the forest reduced by at least 20% –   Administrative report-   Visits to forest –    Forest laws respected-    Conflict over land use reduced
2. Illegal hunting reduced By 2015, Illegal hunting reduced by at least 20% –   Administrative report-   Testimonies –    Forest laws respected 
3. Non timber forest products sustainably managed By 2015 at least 10.000 NTFPs are domesticated and sustainably harvested –   Visits to forest and farms-   Testimonies Community collaboration
4.  Forestation increased. By 2015 at least 5000 trees are planted in the municipality –   Visits to the forest Community collaboration

 

TOURISM AND LEISURE :

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Revenue from the tourism sector  increased Annual revenue from the tourism sector increase by at least 20% –          Council accounts record-          Testimonies Favorable economic and political conditions
Specific objective Development of tourist potentials increased By 2015 at least 100 tourists visit the municipality annually –          Council reports-          testimonies Favorable political conditions
Results 1. Tourist infrastructures such as hotels and restaurants increased By 2014 at least 1 functional standard hotel and restaurant exist in the municipality –          site visit-          administrative  reports Enabling economic conditions
2.  Development of tourist sites increased At least 3 tourist sites are developed and attract tourists by 2014 –          site visits-          council report Enabling economic conditions
3.  Community mobilization improved By 2014, at least 10  tourist guides  trained and functional –          testimonies-          council reports Community solidarity ensured

 

ARTS AND CULTURE :

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Cultural values enhanced By 2015, Cultural awareness within the municipality increase by at least 50% –          reports Stable economic and political climate
Specific objective Deterioration of cultural values reduced Cultural values in the  municipality are practiced by at least 50% of the population by 2015 –          testimonies-          reports Community solidarity ensured
Results 1. Development and promotion of cultural activities increased By 2015, at least 50% of cultural activities are revived and practiced in the municipality –          testimonies-          administrative reports Stable political climate
2.  Cultural infrastructures established By 2015 at least 2 functional community halls and museums exist and are used –          site visits-          council reports Stable economic environment
3. Community mobilization improved At least 60% of the population take part in annual cultural activities –          reports-          testimonies Community solidarity ensured

 

INDUSTRY, MINES AND TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT :

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Industrial base of the municipality increased Council industrial policy put in place  by 2013 –          Visits-          Administrative reports

Favorable policy framework
Specific objective Development of the mining and industrial  sector improved At least one feasibility study conducted by 2014 –          Administrative reports-          Testimonies Favorable policy framework
Results 1. Mining activities in the municipality promoted At least 1 processing industry functional by 2015 –          Prospection reports-          data Favorable policy framework
2. An industrial zone put in place By 2015 at leas one industrial zone exists –          Site visits-          Reports Favorable political climate

 

 

COMMUNICATION :

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Circulation of information improved By 2015, at least 50% of the population are informed on major events –          Testimonies-          Reports Favourable policy framework
Specific objective Access to information increased .By 2015 at least 50% of the population can regularly send and receive information –          Testimonies-          Reports Favourable policy framework
Results 1. Access to radio, TV and internet signals improved By 2015, at 30% of the population receive CRTV and other signals –          Home visits-          Reports Favourable policy framework
2.  Community radio put in place By 2015, at least one functional community radio exist in the municipality –          Visit to radio-          Reports Favorable economic conditions
3. Circulation of news papers increased By 2014 at least one functional newspaper vendor exist in the municipality –          Available newspapers-          Reports Favorable economic conditions

 

 POST AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS :

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Communication with people within and out of the country improved By 2015 at least 50% of the population regularly send and receive information using telecommunication –          Testimonies-          reports Favorable policy framework
Specific objective Access to postal services and telecommunication increased By 2015 at least 50% of the population are satisfied with postal and telecommunication services –          testimonies Favorable policy framework
Results 1. Mobile telecommunication network increased By 2015 at least 2 functional mobile telephone networks exist in the municipality –          list of subscribers-          testimonies Stable economic environment
2.  Functional post office put in place By 2015 at least 1 functional post office exist in the municipality –          visit-          administrative reports

–          testimonies

Favorable policy framework

 LABOUR AND SOCIAL SECURITY :

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Job security increased At least 50% of the working population have job security by 2015 –          Testimonies-          Administrative reports Favorable economic climate
Specific objective Employee Social security payments improved By 2015, 50% employers regularly contribute social security for  their workers –          Testimonies-          Administrative reports Favorable economic climate
Results 1. Stable Institutions increased By 2014 at least 5 stable and profitable institutions established within the municipality  –          Visit-           council reports Favorable economic climate

 

 PUBLIC SECURITY :

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Crime ware reduced By 2015, at least 40% of the population in the municipality circulate freely and live in peace –          Testimonies-          Administrative reports Enabling economic and political climate
Specific objective Insecurity reduced By 2015 the number of criminal cases reduce by at least 30% yearly –          Testimonies-          Security reports Enabling economic and political climate
Results 1. Security officers increased By 2015 at least 10 new elements of the  forces of law and order are transferred and functional –          Transfer decision-          Administrative reports Favourable policy framework
2. Permanent structures for forces of law and order and customary court put in place By 2015 gendarmerie brigade, police post and customary court structures are constructed and functional –          Visit-          Administrative reports Favourable policy framework
3.  Lighting of the municipality increased By 2015, the streets of Toko and Madie Ngolo  are regularly lighted. –          Visit-          Council reports Favourable policy framework

 

 

TERRITORIAL ADMINISTRATION AND DECENTRALISATION :

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Peaceful coexistence and mutual respect within the municipality By 2015 at least 70% of communities express willingness to collaborate with local administrators –          Visits-          Administrative reports Favourable economic and political condition
Specific objective Trust in local administration increased By 2014 at least 50% of the population respect their chiefs, community laws and the local administration –          Testimonies-          Reports Enabling political climate
Results 1. Collaboration and classification of Chiefs improved By 2014 at least 60% of Chiefs are recognized and serve as auxiliaries of the administration. –          Testimonies-          Administrative Reports Enabling political climate
2. Community awareness, commitment & mobilization improved By 2014, at least 60% of the population regularly participates in meetings initiated by the administration. –          Testimonies-          Reports Collaboration community members ensured

 

 

SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH AND INNOVATION:

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Access to Scientific benefits increased within the municipality By 2015 at least 70% of the population have  access to scientific innovations –          Testimonies-          Administrative reports Favourable economic climate
Specific objective Technological innovations increased By 2015,  improved scientific technologies in agriculture and livestock available within the municipality –          Visits-          Administrative Reports Appropriateness of technology ensured
Results 1. Dissemination of scientific innovations (inputs) improved By 2015 scientific inputs in agriculture and livestock made available in 49 villages –          Testimonies-          Field visits

–          Reports

Timeliness and appropriateness of research findings
2. Research outreach programs increased By 2013, research outreach programs  exist in the municipality –          Testimonies-          Research Reports Collaboration of stakeholders ensured

 

SOCIAL AFFAIRS :

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Assistance to vulnerable population increased By 2015, at least 70% of vulnerable persons are empowered and satisfied with the services rendered –          reports-          testimonies Enabling political and economic conditions
Specific objective Social services improved By 2015 at least 70% of vulnerable persons have access to quality social services -Reports-Testimonies Enabling economic conditions
Results  

 

1. Social Centers increased At least 2 functional social centers exist by 2014 -Site visits-Reports Enabling economic conditions
2. Social workers increased By 2014, at least 4 functional trained social workers exist -Transfer decision-Administrative report Favourable policy framework
3. Awareness on available social benefits for vulnerable persons increased At least 80% of vulnerable persons know their social benefits and at least 70% get them regularly -Administrative reports-Testimonies Enabling economic conditions

 

 

 

 

 YOUTH AND CITIZEN EDUCATION :

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Awareness on youthful living and civic  responsibilities increased At least 70% of youths are living responsible lives by 2014 -Visit-Reports Favourable economic conditions
Specific objective Youth empowerment facilities and programs increased By 2014, realistic youth programs are drawn up and implemented yearly in conducive environments -Visit-reports Favourable education policy
Results1 Trainers and youth animators increased By 2014 at least 2 functional youths animators are in place and functional -visit-Report Favourable economic conditions
2. Youth empowerment structures and services increased By 2015 at least 1 youth animation centre is constructed and functional -Transfer decision-Administrative report Favourable policy framework.
3. Mobilization of youths on income generating activities increased At least 10% of youths operate gainful businesses by 2014 -Reports Enabling political conditions.

 

 SPORTS AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION :

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Physical education exercises increased. By 2015, at least 50% of the population carry out physical exercises -Testimonies-Visits Change of attitude in sporting activities
Specific objective Sporting activities increased Diversified sporting activities increased by at least 20%  and promoted regularly -Reports-Observations Enabling economic conditions
Results 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1. Sports equipment in schools increased By 2015 each school is equipped with at least 3 sport equipment -School record-Visits Enabling economic conditions
2. Sports teachers increased At least 5 functional trained teachers in place by 2013 -Transfer decision-Reports Favorable policy framework.
3. Sports complex increased At least 2 sport complex exist and used. -Visits-Reports Enabling economic conditions.
4. Local sports activities increased At least 2 sport competitions organized yearly -Council reports-Testimonies Enabling economic conditions

 

 

 EMPLOYMENT AND VOCATIONAL TRAINING :

 

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Skills development  increased. By 2015, marketable skills transferred to at least 40% of persons within the employable age -Testimonies-Trainees evaluation reports Enabling economic conditions
Specific objective Employment increased By 2015, at least 40% of individuals with professional skills are gainfully employed -Employment contracts-Testimonies Enabling economic conditions
Results1.

 

1. Training opportunities increased By 2014, at least 500 individuals trained on small business start ups -Reports-Testimonies Favourable policy framework
2. Self employment increased By 2015, at least 50% of those trained are self employed – Visit to business places- Tax receipts

 

Enabling business climate

 

 

 TRANSPORT :

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Circulation of goods and persons improved At least 50% of the population move safely and on time within and outside the municipality by 2015 -Observations-Council record

-Testimonies

Favourable economic and political conditions
Specific objective Means of transportation improved By 2015, at least 50% of the population travel in good vehicles with affordable fares -Testimonies-Council record Cooperation of transporters ensured
Results 

 

 

 

 

 

1. Transport vehicles increased By 2015, transport vehicles and motorbikes increase by at least 40% -Council record-Observations Enabling economic conditions
2. State of vehicles improved At least 70% of vehicles and motorbikes are regularly maintained -Visit to garages-Testimonies

-Records of broken down vehicles

Enabling economic conditions.
3. Overloading of vehicles and motorbikes reduced At least 40% of passengers travel comfortably in vehicles and on motorbikes regularly. -Testimonies-Transport record Cooperative transporters union

 

 

  HIGHER EDUCATION :

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Number of professional institutions  increased At least 1 professional institution exist in the municipality by 2014 -Testimonies-Reports Enabling economic conditions
Specific objective Access to quality higher education increased At least 25% of youths obtain Diplomas and degrees by 2015 -Enrollment register-Testimonies Favourable economic and political environment
Results 

 

 

 

 

1. Access to professional schools increased At least 25% of youths are admitted into professional schools by 2015 -Visit-Decision creating the school Favourable political environment
2. Higher professional schools in the division increased At least 1 professional school created  by 2014 -Testimonies  Enabling economic conditions.

 

SMALL AND MEDIUM SIZE ENTERPRISES, SOCIAL ECONOMY AND HANDICRAFT :

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Actors in the Informal Sector within the municipality increased By 2015  informal sector actors increase by at least 35% yearly –    council revenue reports-    testimonies –   security ensured-   enabling economic environment
Specific objective Small and medium size  enterprises increased By 2015 at least 40 small and medium size enterprises are operational in the municipality –    Visit-    Council reports enabling economic environment
Results 1. Capacity and skills of the population for informal sector activities increased At least 400 persons  acquire knowledge and skills and operate small enterprise (restoration, woodwork, hair dressers, mechanics, tailoring) –    Visit to business places-    Council reports –   enabling economic environment-   enthusiasm of youths
2.  Access to the services of small and medium size enterprises increased At least 70% of the population attend various training organized by this sector by 2013 Training reports –   enabling economic environment-   wiliness of the youths ensured

 

 

 TOKO COUNCIL :

Strategy Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions
Level Formulation
Overall objective Provision of basic services to the population increased At least 70% of the population have access to basic services by 2015 –  Visits-  Observations

–  Pictures

– Administrative reports

Enabling economic and political environment
Specific objective Functional capacity of Toko council strengthened By 2015, at least 80% of  council departments are in place and offering services to the population –  Testimonies-  Administrative report

–  Visits

–  Pictures

– Collaboration of main stakeholders- Enabling economic conditions
Results  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1. Human resource management improved – By 2015, the council is equipped with sufficient qualified and regularly motivated staff. –  List of council staff- Organigramme

– Council reports

– Permanent residence of staff ensured- Favourable policy framework
2.  Funds increased Council funds increased yearly by at least 25% and used following budget allocations –           Financial report-          Testimonies Favourable economic conditions
3. Management of council assets increased By 2015 at least 50% of council  assets are acquired and used according to standard operating procedures –          Visit-          Council report –          Favourable economic conditions-          Collaboration of all stakeholders ensured
4.  Collaboration with main stakeholders improved By 2013, at least 50% of the main stakeholders actively participate in the realization of development projects in the municipality -TestimoniesCouncil reports

 

Conducive political climate

 

  

5.0.                                        OPERATIONAL PLANNING (PROGRAMMING)

 

Cost of the CDP per Sector

No

Sector

Cost of Activities (FCFA)

1

Women Empowerment and the Promotion of the Family

124.000.000

2

Public Works

3.219.000.000

3

Energy

225.000.000

4

Water

2.004.300.000

5

Secondary Education

99.960.000

6

Basic Education

909.080.000

7

Public Health

74.700.000

8

Commerce

59,000,000

9

Agriculture and Rural Development

323.000.000

10

Livestock

83.300.000

11

Fisheries

71.000.000

12

State Property and Land Tenure

5.300.000

13

Housing and Urban Development

10.900.000

14 Environment, Nature Protection and Sustainable Development

34.100.000

15

Forestry and Wildlife

35.600.000

16

Tourism and Leisure

63.000.000

17

Arts and Culture

155.400.000

18

Industry, Mines and Technological Development

3.000.000

19

Communication

26.300.000

20

Post and Telecommunication

20.000.000

21

Labor and Social Insurance

16.400.000

22

Public Security

100.500.000

23

Territorial Administration and Decentralization

9.900.000

24

Scientific Research and Innovation

20.000.000

25

Social Affairs

100.700.000

26

Youth and Citizen Education

105.400.000

27

Sports and Physical Education

57.300.000

28

Employment and Vocational Training

210.800.000

29

Transport

60.000.000

30

Higher Education

4.500.000

31

Small and Medium Size Enterprises, Social Economy and Handicraft

20.000.000

32

Toko Council

78.200.000

33

Total Cost of the CDP

8.309.640.000

 

Total cost of the Communal Development Plan (CDP) of Toko municipality is eight thousand three hundred nine million six hundred and forty thousand francs CFA.


6.1. Mid Term Expenditure Framework (MITEF) 3 years (2012 to 2014)

 

No Sector Micro Projects / (locations)                                 Cost Funding Source
1 Basic Education Lobby for transfer of 20 trained teachers(Mundemba & Buea)

600.000

Council Budget

2   Construct  (12) Classrooms(Toko, Madie I, Lipenja, Mokako, Dikome, Dibonda)

118.000.000

PIB /FEICOM

3   Construct (12) Latrines(Toko, Madie I, Lipenja, Mokako, Dikome)

60.000.000

PIB /FEICOM

4   Construct (5) Fences(Toko, Madie I, Lipenja, Mokako, Dikome)

50.000.000

PIB /FEICOM

5   Supply (3.719) Desks(Kilikile, Esukotan, Ikenge, Bweme, Betika,Nwamoki, Ikoe, Banyo, Ndoi, Itali, Mofako, Dibonda, Bombangi, Lipenja, Dikome, Madie I, II, III, Toko, Moboka)

111.580.000

PNDP/ FEICOM

6   Supply  (72 sets) of Tables and Chairs(Kilikile, Esukotan, Ikenge, Bweme, Betika,Nwamoki, Ikoe, Banyo, Ndoi, Itali, Mofako, Dibonda, Bombangi, Lipenja, Dikome, Madie I, II, III, Toko, Moboka)

25.000.000

PIB

7   Supply Didactic Materials (assorted)(Kilikile, Esukotan, Ikenge, Bweme, Betika,Nwamoki, Ikoe, Banyo, Ndoi, Itali, Mofako, Dibonda, Bombangi, Lipenja, Dikome, Madie I, II, III, Toko, Moboka)

46.000.000

PIB

8 Secondary Education Lobby for the transfer of  20 trained teachers(Toko, Madie I, Lipenja)                    600.000

Council Budget

9 Construt  14 Classrooms and Workshops(Toko, Madie I, Lipenja)

126.000.000

PIB/FEICOM

10 Construct  3 Latrines (Toko, Madie I, Lipenja)

16.250.000

PIB/FEICOM

11 Construct 3 Fences(Toko, Madie I, Lipenja)

32.000.000

PIB

12 Supply  400 Desks (Toko, Madie I, Lipenja)

12.000.000

PNDP / PIB

13   Supply  (10 sets)Tables and Chairs(Toko, Madie I, Lipenja)

3.500.000

PIB

14   Supply Didactic Materials (assorted)(Toko, Madie I, Lipenja)

6.000.000

PIB

15   Allocate and Equip library (1)(Toko)

20.000.000

PNDP / PIB

16   Construct Administrative Block (2)(Toko, Madie I)

45.000.000

PIB

17 Public Health Renovate 2  Health Centers (Lipenja & Dikome)

15.000.000

FEICOM

18   Supply 10 Normal Beds (Lipenja & Dikome)

3.000.000

               FEICOM
19   Supply 8 Delivery Beds (Toko, Madie I, Dikome)

  4.000.000

                FEICOM
20   Supply 6 Delivery Kits (Toko, Madie I, Dikome)

1.500.000

PIB

21   Supply 15 Baby Cots (Toko, Madie I, Dikome)

750.000

PIB

22   Supply 3 lots of Laboratory Equipment (Toko, Madie I, Dikome)

15.000.000

PIB

23   Equip  3 pharmacies with shelves and drugs(Toko, Madie I, Dikome)

25.000.000

PNDP

24   Train 3  Pharmacy Attendants (Toko, Madie I, Dikome)

600.000

SWSFH

25   Lobby  for transfer of qualified staff(Toko, Madie I, Dikome)

600.000

Council Budget

26 Agriculture & Rural Development Train farmers in 3 zones on pests and diseases control & Supply fungicides and pesticides(Ngolo, Batanga, Bakoko Zones)

13.000.000

FEICOM

27   Organise farmers in 3 zones to have access to fungicides and pesticides(Ngolo, Batanga, Bakoko Zones)

150.000

Council Budget

28   Sensitize farmers in 3 zones on the use of improved planting materials(Ngolo, Batanga, Bakoko Zones)

600.000

Council Budget

29   Distribute improved planting materials to farmers in 3 zones at subsidized rates(Ngolo, Batanga, Bakoko Zones)

70.000.000

FEICOM

30   Supply 3 Cassava Processing Units in 3 zones(Ngolo, Batanga, Bakoko Zones)

40.000.000

FEICOM

31   Train farmers in 3 zones on soil improvement techniques(Ngolo, Batanga, Bakoko Zones)

1.000.000

PNDP

32   Train farmers in 3 zones on improved farming practices(Ngolo, Batanga, Bakoko Zones)

1.000.000

PNDP

33   Train farmers in 3 zones on post harvest losses(Ngolo, Batanga, Bakoko Zones)

1.000.000

FEICOM

34   Support Plantation Farming & Supplyplanting materials (cocoa, cassava, plantains, banana) in 3 zones

(Ngolo, Batanga, Bakoko Zones)

80.000.000

PNDP / MINADER / FEICOM

35 Commerce Construct market(Madie I)

10.000.000

PIB

36   Maintain Markets(Madie I, Meangwe I)

5.000.000

PIB

37   Disseminate market prices of goods(Madie I, Meangwe I)

300.000

Council Budget

38   Lobby for the creation of 1 Micro- finance Institution(Madie I)

400.000

Council budget

39 Public Works Conduct 2 Studies for road construction(Madie I, Toko)

5.000.000

PIB

40   Construct new road(Madie I, Toko)

120.000.000

PIB

41   Maintain new roads(Madie I, Toko)

50.000.000

PIB

42   Conduct Studies for road rehabilitation(Madie I, Toko)

2.500.000

PIB/ FEICOM

43   Rehabilitate roads(Madie I, Toko)

70.000.000

FEICOM

44   Conduct Studies for Bridges and Culverts(Madie I, Toko)

1.500.000

FEICOM

45   Construct 6 Bridges(Madie I, Ikenge, Banyo, Lipenja, Moboka, Dikome Ngolo)

 

340.000.000

PNDP / PIB

46   Construct  12 Culverts(Madie I, Ikenge, Banyo, Lipenja, Moboka, Dikome Ngolo)

48.000.000

PNDP / PIB

47 Energy Rehabilitate 1 thermal electricity plant (Madie)

500.000

Council Budget

48   Maintain 1 thermal electric plant (Toko)

100.000

Council Budget

49   Install 4 Community generators (Dikome, Lipenja, Mapanja, Ikenge)

47.000.000

PIB

50   Maintain Community generators(Dikome, Lipenja, Mapanja, Ikenge)

3.000.000

Council Budget

51 Water Submit  1 Proposal to FEICOM (Toko)

500.000

Council Budget

52   Conduct Studies(Dikome, Lipenja, Mapanja, Ikenge)

2.500.000

FEICOM

53   Construct 4 water shemes (Dikome, Lipenja, Mapanja, Ikenge)

252.000.000

FEICOM

54   Mobilize Community Contribution(Dikome, Lipenja, Mapanja, Ikenge)

500.000

VDC / TOC

55   Creat and equip water maintenance committee(Dikome, Lipenja, Mapanja, Ikenge)                       600.000         Council Budget
56   Rehabilitate & Extend Madie – Moboka water sheme

15.000.000

PNDP

57   Sensitise Communities on hygiene and sanitation in 4 villages(Dikome, Lipenja, Mapanja, Ikenge)

500.000

VDC / TOC

58   Enact and implement laws on use of 4 sources of water(Dikome, Lipenja, Mapanja, Ikenge)

200.000

VDC / TOC

58   Train 4 Caretakers(Dikome, Lipenja, Mapanja, Ikenge)

250.000

Council budget

59   Protect 4 Catchment areas(Dikome, Lipenja, Mapanja, Ikenge)

500.000

Council budget

60 Toko Council  Train Staff and Councilors(Toko)

5.000.000

PNDP

61   Aquire Office equipment(Toko)

7.000.000

PNDP

62   Paint Council Chambers(Toko)

5.000.000

FEICOM

63   Rehabilitate Tipper & Pick up(Toko)

10.000.000

FEICOM

64   Rehabilitate Catepillar(Toko)

10.000.000

FEICOM

65   Acquire Real Estate(Toko)

50.000.000

PIB

66 Total MITEF

2.007.580.000

 

Total cost of TOC MITEF (2012 – 2014) is two thousand seven million, five hundred and eighty thousand francs CFA.

6.3    Annual Investment Plan

 

6.3.1. Available Resources and Deadlines

No Donor Amount (FCFA) When Donor Conditions
1 PNDP

63.000.000

March

10% Council Contribution

2 Toko Council

7.560.000

March

PNDP Requirement

3 PIB

19.500.000

February

Contract Award

4 TOTAL

90.060.000

 

 

 

 

6.3.2. Annual Program of Priority Projects (2012)

No

Sector

Name of Project

Type of Project

Objective

Location (s)/ Villages

Financing Partner / Execution Period

Project Cost

(FCFA)/ Vote Holder

1

Basic Education

Supply 320 desks in nursery and primary schools

Supplies

To increase access to quality educational facilities

GNS: Lipenja & Toko. GS: Madie Newtown, Madie Ngolo, Madie III Boembe, Banyo, Mofako Batanga, Bweme, Kilekile, Ikoi Ngolo, Dikome Ngolo, Moboka, Meangwe I, Toko, Betika, Dibonda, Bombangi, Lipenja, Ikenge, Esukotan, Itali, Nwamoki, Ndoi

PNDP/ TOC

(March 2012)

9.600.000/ Mayor

2

Secondary Education

Supply 70 desks to secondary schools

Supplies

To increase access to quality educational facilities

GSS Madie I and GTC Lipenja

PNDP/ TOC

(May 2012)

2.100.000 / Mayor

 

Supply 60 desks to secondary schools

Supplies

To increase access to quality educational facilities

GSS Toko

PIB

(May 2012)

1.800.000 / Director of Secondary Education

 

Construction of 2 classrooms

Construction

To increase access to quality educational facilities

GSS Madie Ngolo

PIB

(May 2012)

18.000.000/ Director of Secondary Education

 

Supply 6 Lots of tables and chairs

Supplies

To increase access to quality educational facilities

GSS Toko, Madie I and GTC Lipenja

PNDP / TOC

(May 2012)

1.500.000 / Mayor

 

Supply Didactic materials

Supplies

To increase access to quality educational facilities

GSS Toko, Madie I and GTC Lipenja

PNDP / TOC

(May 2012)

1.800.000/ Mayor

 

Equip Library with shelves and books

Supplies

To increase access to quality educational facilities

GSS Toko

PNDP / TOC

(May 2012)

1.260.000/ Mayor

3

Public Health

Equip pharmacy with shelves and drugs

 

Supplies

To increase access to quality health care

Toko

PNDP/ TOC

(May 2012)

5.000.000/ Mayor

4

Agriculture & Rural Development

Train farmers on improved farming methods (Post harvest lost & Soil improvement techniques) 

 

Supplies

 

Ngolo, Batanga and Bakoko

PNDP/ TOC

(March 2012)

1.000.000/ Mayor

5

 

Supply improved planting materials

Supplies

To increase food crop security

Ngolo, Batanga and Bakoko

PNDP/ TOC

(March 2012)

3.000.000/ Mayor

6

Water

Rehabilitate and extend potable water to Madie I & Moboka

Construction

To increase access to portable water supply

Madie I & Moboka

PNDP/ TOC

(June 2012)

15.000.000/ Mayor

7

Public Works

Construct  Iroka Bridge

Construction

To improve security of movements between Toko and Meangwe I

Meangwe I

PNDP/ TOC

(June 2012)

12.000.000/ Mayor

8

 

Construct culverts in Toko

Construction

To increase movement between Toko town

Toko

PNDP/ TOC

(June 2012)

6.000.000/ Mayor

9

Toko Council

Organise capacity building workshops (training) for Council Staff and councilors 

 

 

 

Supplies

To improve the functioning of Toko Council

Toko

PNDP/ TOC

(March 2012)

5.000.000/ Mayor

10

 

Supply computer, generator, tables, chairs, shelves, cupboards in offices

Supplies

To improve the functioning of Toko Council

Toko

PNDP/ TOC

(March 2012)

7.000.000/ Mayor

11

Total 2012 AIP

 

 

 

 

90.060.000

 

            TOC Priority Projects for 2012 stands at ninety million and sixty thousand francs CFA

6.4.  Simplified Environmental Management Framework of the

MITEF.

 

6.4.1. Main Potential Impact (socio-environmental) and

Mitigation measures

 

a)      Possible Social Impacts:

Micro project type in the MITEF Possible Social  Impacts  (Positive)  Possible Social  Impacts  (Social  Risks) Mitigation Measures
Supply Improved planting materials to farmenrs & Open new farms (plantations) –     Increased self employment opportunities-     Increased food production

–     Reduction in malnutrition

–     Food security ensured

–     Conflicts on land to be ceded for plantation planting  –     Create and train Land Management Platform members-     Ensure concrete Land Transfer agreements with KORUP, Christain Philantrophic and SITHE GLOBAL

 

Construction of classrooms and laboratories  for seconday education –     High performance in public exams-     Condusive learning environment

–     Increased  literacy rate

–     Reduction in leasure activities due limited land –     More allocation of land for play ground
Construction of embarkment –     Improve circulation of persons and goods-     Less distruction of buildings and household equipment –     Increase in accident –     Sign board  along the embarkments indicating danger zones
Install  new thermal plans –     Increase in socio economic activities-     Reduction in rural exodus

–     Increase in self employment

–     Increase in communication

–     Increase in crime wave-     Fire desasters

–     Conflict in site selection

–     High security control-     Installation of circuit breakers
Construction of New water schemes –     Reduction of  water borne diseases-     Intensification and diversification of socio cultural activities due to increase time available

–     Children will be more punctual at school leading to better performance

–     Improved hygiene and sanitation

–     Change in gender roles (more men fetching water since the taps are at their door steps)

–      Poor sanitation around water systeems –     Sensitisation of the population proper hygiene and sanitation
Construction of new roads –     There will be reduction in travelling hazards and risks-     Reduction in transport fares

–     Transportation cost for goods to travel by vehicle and motorbike will significantl reduced

–     Communities will notice an increase in traffic volume

–     Influx of theives  due to good roads-     High rate of juviniel deliquency and prostitution –     High security control-     Sensitisation of youths
Supply equipment (beds, delivery kits, laboratories –     Reduction in mobility and mortality rates-     Improvement in health status –     Poor hygienic conditions in use of equipments –     Sensitisation on hygienic conditions in use of equipments
Construction of new classroomsFor Basic education –     High performance in public exams-     Condusive learning environment

–     Increased  litracy rate

–     Reduction in leasure activities due limited land –     More allocation of land for play ground

 

 

b)      Possible Environmental Impacts: 

Micro project type in MITEF Possible Environmental Impacts  (positive)  Possible Environmental Impacts  (Environmental Risks) Mitigation Measures
Supply Improved planting materials to farmenrs & Open new farms (plantations) –     Reduction in  post harvest losses  –     Destruction of the forest and wildlife systems –     Agreement with conservation organizations on land to be ceded for farming
Construction of classrooms and laboratories –     Condusive learning environment –     Destruction of the natural environment –     Areas dug should be backfilled and trees planted
Construction of embarkment –     Reduce landslides along the motorable road  –     Water course will distroyed –     Deviation of the water course
Install new thermal electricity plant –     Provision light for the storage of fish thus reduced post harvest lossess –     Pollution of the environment by carbon monoxide –     Filter (carbon filter) to reduced pollution
Construction of new water schemes 

 

–     Improvement of hygiene and sanitation –     Destruction of soil struction and erosion for areas dugged for the construction of structures and pileline-     Waste from structures –     Areas dugged for construction  of structures and pileline will be backfilled-     Waste from structures will be directed to soak away pits ; through the availibility of water supply
Construction of new roads –     Post harvest losses in the disenclaved communities will witness a reduction –     Destruction of flora and funa-     Increase in soil erosion

–     Environmental pollution (dust)

–     Planting of trees along the road-     Construction of drainage system

–     Watering of road during construction

Supply equipment (beds, delivery kits, laboratories) –     Improved hygienic and sanitation conditions in the health centers and hospitals –     Poor waste disposal –     Dumping site for waste will be created and used-     Gabage cans will be installed
Construction of  new classrooms –     Condusive learning environment –     Destruction of the natural environment (funa and flora)-     Digging of site will increase erosion –     Planting of trees and lowers

 

6.4.2. Simplified Socio Environmental Management Plan

 

The plan below outlines  the measures,  actors,  periods and follow up indicators with corresponding  costs associated with the MITEF.

Environmental measures Putting in place actors Periods Follow up actors Costs Observations
Train Council Follow up Committee on environmental aspects of project implementation(using PNDP’s socio-environmental management framework).

 

PNDP    2012
  • Div. Delegations of MINEP  & MINAS
  •  PNDP
Council / PNDP joint budget
Checklist on the Socio-environmental form. SG and  Development officer 2012 to   2014
  • Div. Delegations of MINEP  & MINAS

  PNDP

  Follow up Committee

  Minicipal councilor s

Council / PNDP joint budget Associated Cost are inbuilt at  micro project conception level
Train COMES on  Policies to safeguard  socio environmental aspects. PNDP 2012    to 2013
  • Div. Delegations of MINEP  & MINAS

  PNDP

  Follow up Committee

  Minicipal councilor s

 Council / PNDP joint budget
Conduct Environnemental Impact  Studies/ Assessments (EIA) Council Executives and PNDP. 2012 to   2014
  •  Div. Delegations of MINEP  & MINAS

  PNDP

  Follow up Committee

  Minicipal councilor s

Council / PNDP joint budget The Council shall cover any costs associated with resettlments.
Monitor Socio Environmental Management Plan and Contractors. Follow up Committee andContractors 2012 to   2014
  • Div. Delegations of MINEP  & MINAS

 

 Council / PNDP joint budget

 

 

6.5. CONTRACT AWARD PLAN (CAP):

The CAP is presented in three categories namely; construction, infrastructure and supplies which are financed by the PNDP.

Category Project Location Deposit  of Tender Delivery of Tender Contract Amount
Construction Construction of 2 classrooms GSS Madie Ngolo

26/02/12

9/07/12

18.000.000

Infrastructure Rehabilitate and extend potable water to Madie I & Moboka Madie I & Moboka

26/02/12

9/07/12

15.000.000

(PNDP Funds)

Construct  Iroka Bridge Meangwe I

26/02/12

9/07/12

12.000.000

(PNDP Funds)

Construct 2 culverts Toko

26/02/12

9/07/12

6.000.000

(PNDP Funds)

Supplies Supply 320 desks in nursery and primary schools GNS: Lipenja & Toko. GS: Madie Newtown, Madie Ngolo, Madie III Boembe, Banyo, Mofako Batanga, Bweme, Kilekile, Ikoi Ngolo, Dikome Ngolo, Moboka, Meangwe I, Toko, Betika, Dibonda, Bombangi, Lipenja, Ikenge, Esukotan,Itali, Nwamoki, Ndoi

26/02/12

9/07/12

9.600.000

(PNDP Funds)

Supply 70 desks to secondary schools GSS Madie I and GTC Lipenja

26/02/12

9/07/12

2.100.000

(PNDP Funds)

Supply 60 desks to secondary schools GSS Toko

26/02/12

9/07/12

1.800.000

(PNDP Funds)

Supply 6 Lots of tables and chairs GSS Toko, Madie I and GTC Lipenja

26/02/12

9/07/12

1.500.000

(PNDP Funds)

Supply Didactic materials GSS Toko, Madie I and GTC Lipenja

26/02/12

9/07/12

1.800.000

(PNDP Funds)

Equip Library with shelves and books GSS Toko

26/02/12

9/07/12

1.260.000

(PNDP Funds)

Equip pharmacy with shelves and drugs  Toko

26/02/12

9/07/12

5.000.000

(PNDP Funds)

Train farmers on improved farming methods (Post harvest lost & Soil improvement techniques) 

 

Ngolo, Batanga and Bakoko

26/02/12

9/07/12

1.000.000

(PNDP Funds)

Supply improved planting materials Ngolo, Batanga and Bakoko

26/02/12

9/07/12

3.000.000

(PNDP Funds)

Organise capacity building workshops (training) for Council Staff and councilors 

 

 

 

Toko 

26/02/12

9/07/12

5.000.000

(PNDP Funds)

Supply computer, generator, tables, chairs, shelves, cupboards in offices Toko

26/02/12

9/07/12

7.000.000

(PNDP Funds)

Total CAP         90.060.000

 

6.0. MONITORING AND EVALUATION  MECHANISM

 

6.1.    Composition of the Follow up Committee:

No Name Position Function Telephone
1 Osih Mindako President Civil Status Registry/ Council Technician 96 58 39 87 / 79 67 31 21
2 Balemba Hilary Secretary Development Officer 74 85 56 93
3 Chief Nwese Adilf Ekokola Member Traditional Ruler 75 01 13 40
4 Nakeli Daniel Mboka Member Teacher
5 Cjief Esoh Samson Member Agric Technician
6 Chief Eboka Eboka Christopher III Member Traditional Ruler 77 01 51 67
7 MUDEC Group, Buea Technical Adviser LSO 77 64 94 30

Functions of the Follow up Committee:

 

Follow up work done by contractors as per the contract specifications including environmental concerns.

Execute periodic supervision visits to ensure that effective work is being done

Obtain funds through communication with the competent persons or structures

Evaluate and Update the AIP and MITEF

Update the Consolidated Report (Monographic Study) of Toko Council.

Search alternative sources of Funding for council activities.

Activate and operate the email address and website of the council

Work in close collaboration with Council Executives

Produce Monthly & Quarterly reports to the council

 6.2 Indicators for monitoring and evaluation (relation to the AIP)

 

Micro project
Strategic Action to be accomplished
Date of Monitoring and Evaluation
Resources Needed
What was planned to be done Person Responsible What has been done What still has to be done When should it be completed What will be there to show that it has been done Comments and reaction of the M&E committte
Activity 1            
Activity 2            
Activity 3            
Activity 4            
Activity 5            


7.3  Follow up Plans,Tools and Frequency (2012)

 

No. Duties Tasks Tools Expected Results Time Responsible
1 Participatory Management of information related to the execution of the CDP Collection of data Data Sheets Collected data Permanent Dev. Agent
Reporting Data consolidation charts Reports Monthly Dev. Agent
Hold Meetings Minutes Reports Monthly President Follow up Committee
Review & Dispatch Reports Project Monitoring book, Progress Reports, Project Schedule Reports Monthly Mayor
2 Participatory Administration of the Follow up process Prepare Committee Action & submit to Mayor/PNDP Action Plans Reports Monthly Dev. Agent Committee Chairperson
Hold Focus meeting on AIP & CAP Minutes Reports March 31st 2012 Mayor/SG
Monitor Tender Process on Feasibility Studies (FS) Minutes Reports March/April SG/ Dev. & Fin.Officer/
Monitor  Execution of FS Minutes Reports March/April SG/ Dev. & Fin.Officer/
Ensure proper validation of FS Minutes Reports March/April SG/ Dev. & Fin.Officer/
Submit request for financing from PNDP/other funders March/April Mayor
Mobilize council/community contributions March/April Mayor/ SG/Dev. Agent
Monitor execution of micro projects Minutes Reports March/April
Planned spot checks during project execution Project Monitoring book, Progress Reports, Project Schedule Reports Monthly President/members of  Follow up Committee
Unplanned spot checks during project execution Surveys Reports Weekly VDC & VTC, Couniclor concerned
Monitor validation of receipt of completed projects Reports March/April/ May/ June President/members of  Follow up Committee
Monitor commissioning & use of projects March/April/ May/ June President/members of  Follow up Committee
3 Socio Environmental Management Train Follow up Committee on Environmental PNDP Checlist aspects of project management PNDP Checlist Reports March/April Mayor
Train Enlarged Council Session on Socio- environmental Policies PNDP Checlist Reports March/April Mayor
Monitor Socio environment aspects of projects PNDP Checlist Reports March/April/ May/ June President/members of  Follow up Committee
Conduct Environmental Impact Assesments (studies) PNDP Checlist Reports March/April/ May/ June President/members of  Follow up Committee
Monitor Socio Environmental Management Plan PNDP Checlist Reports March/April/ May/ June President/members of  Follow up Committee
4 Logistical Support to Contractors during project execution Provide  Safekeeping for Materials Rooms Materials safe Daily VDC & VTC, Couniclor
Provide Lodging Rooms Contractor comfortable Daily VDC & VTC, Couniclor
5 Communication of CDP contents Review and Execute communication plan Communication checklist Report Monthly SG/ Dev. & Fin.Officer/
  Create & maintain contacts with potential funding partners for the MITEF with focus on the 2013 projects Internet/letters Report Monthly SG/ Dev. & Fin.Officer/
Initiate and Maintain Decentralized Cooperation with neighboring Councils (Mundemba, Nguti, Konye, Dikome Balue, Eyumojock) Meetings/letters Report Quarterly SG/ Dev. & Fin.Officer/
Maintain liaison role with all technical services at sub divisional, divisional & regional levels Meetings/letters Report Monthly SG/ Dev. & Fin.Officer/
6 Participatory Reviews Update Council Monograph Data Sheets Report November SG/ Dev. & Fin.Officer/
    Review  2012 AIP Data Sheets Report Quarterly SG/ Dev. & Fin.Officer/
Review MITEF & Prepare 2013 AIP Data Sheets Report November SG/ Dev. & Fin.Officer/
Facilitate Resource Mobilization for 2013 Data Sheets Report November SG/ Dev. & Fin.Officer/
Facilitate Municipal Deliberation  2013 AIP Meeting Report November Mayor
7 Execute  Financial Commitments Raise PV Check Reports Monthly Finance Agent
    Sign Check Check Reports Monthly Mayor
Produce financial statements Income statement Reports Monthly Fin. Agent


 

7.4  Review Mechanism of the CDP and preparation of the next

AIP

 

The Follow up Committee should engage in monthly reviews of the 2012 AIP to ascertain the rate of realisation and  to address gaps.

An end of 2012 evaluation exercise should be conducted so as to enable TOC determine best practices and lapses inorder to improve on future performances.

TOC development actors should be current with information on new orientations and emerging issues (regular use of the internet) that could be exploited and integrated in the AIP of 2013.

The services of competent development actors within and without the municipality (including the PNDP) should be highly solicited.

 

7.5  Communication Plan of the CDP

 

The Communication Plan to be produced annually,  is a tool which will inform the council on best possible ways to make the broadest publicity about its CDP to the public and to technical and financial partners.

ACTION TIMEFRAME PERSONS RESPONSIBLE
Produce and circulate fliers to all villages containing objectives, activities, and community rights & responsibilities 10th to 31st January 2012 Mayor /SG/Dev. Officer
Organise Open Day in 5 Key villages  and distribute MITEF/ AIP to  all socio development groups 1st Feb. To 31st March 2012 Mayor, Deputies/SG/ Dev. Officer 
Jumpstart Decentralized cooperation of Bakassi Councils Feb. 15th to 28th, 2012 Mayor, Deputies/SG/ Dev. Officer 
Lobby potential partners including  PNDP, SONARA, HPI, SOWEDA, FEICOM, KORUP, CHRISTAIN PHILANTROPHIC, SG SOC, MINADER, MINEPIA, MINEPAT, MINBASE, MINSEC, MINSANTE, MINEE, MINTRANSPORT, MINTP, Elites and Embassies etc… March 2012 Mayor, Deputies/SG & Follow-up committee

 

7.0.                                        CONCLUSION:

The process to elaborate the CDP of KIC can be effectively appreciated when one looks at the actors and tools at each stage within the process, the timing, the challenges encountered and the way forward. The process took place between the months of July and December 2011 and involved three principal actors including the council (beneficiary), the PNDP (financial and technical support) and the LSO (service provider). Other actors including council management, staff, local stakeholders and technical services were actively involved at various stages of the process which included; preparation, participatory diagnosis, data consolidation and analysis, planning, resource mobilization and programming, monitoring and evaluation. The preparatory stage started with the training of LSO data collectors who later restituted the training to other research assistants. The council and the LSO held several planning meetings and sensitized (using fliers, circulars and the radio) the population on their role and responsibilities which ended with the holding of the official launching workshop. The main result in this first stage was to create awareness and increase the participation rate of the stakeholders. The next stage was the participatory diagnosis stage which withnessed the collection and treatment of information (using a variety of tools) at the level of the council, urban space and in all villages sector by sector. The diagnosis in the council involved councilors, staff, council management, and beneficiaries of council services including technical collaborators located within the municipality. Diagnosis at the level of the urban space was conducted in Barracks (main commercial town) and Ngosso I (administrative head quarters) because they had a few sectors with infrastructure which makes them somewhat urban. Diagnoses involving twenty nine identified sectors were also conducted in all thirty two villages. The main outputs at this stage were the CID and USD reports. The third stage involved the consolidation of the village by village and sectorial data which enabled the production of the consolidated diagnosis and mapping report. The forth stage in the process included the planning workshop, resource mobilization and programming during which yhe deliberations of several participants facilitated the production of a draft CDP. The last two stages in the process involved implementation (AIP and CAP) and monitoring and evaluation of financed activities. The entire process was challenging because it was participatory with sometimes conflicting viewpoints. The level of understanding of stakeholders also added to the challenges as planners had to speak through interpreters with the risk of information being distorted. The timing of the process was problematic in that it data was collected during the heart of the rainy season with violent sea waves that put immense strain on the research assistants. Due to insecurity within the municipality, researchers were accompanied by BIR elements who were constantly putting pressure on the data collection activities by hurrying to return to their bases because they were not well informed on the need for patience when communicating with villagers.

Finally, the collaboration between the main actors in the CDP elaboration process was relatively cordial largely due to the fact that the roles and responsibilities of each were clearly spelt out and constantly being reviewed.



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